Statistical characteristics of ionospheric hiss waves

first_imgIn this study, we use the observations of electromagnetic waves by DEMETER satellite to investigate propagation characteristics of low altitude ionospheric hiss. In an event study, intense hiss wave power is concentrated over a narrow frequency band with a central frequency that decreases as latitude decreases, which coincides to the variation of local proton cyclotron frequency fCH. The wave propagates obliquely to the background magnetic field and equatorward from high latitude region. We use about 6 years’ observations to statistically study the dependence of ionospheric hiss wave power on location, local time, geomagnetic activity and season. The results demonstrate that the ionospheric hiss power is stronger on the dayside, under higher geomagnetic activity, in local summer and confined near the region where the local fCH is equal to the wave frequency. To explain the concentration of wave power, a ray tracing simulation is performed and reproduced the wave propagation process.last_img read more

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Readers Share Red Fox Photos From Ocean City

first_img__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter“Like” us on Facebook Sightings of red foxes in Ocean City cause a stir in Ocean City each spring (read more: Fearless Red Foxes Getting Cozy With Life in Ocean City) and a photo of one on the boardwalk among the crowd waiting for fresh doughnuts at Brown’s Restaurant on Wednesday morning drew lots of interest (read more: Red Fox Joins Line for Brown’s Doughnuts in Ocean City).The stories linked above include information on the importance of not feeding the foxes and of keeping trash covered.Readers shared these images of foxes at different parts of the island. Here’s a sampling: [Best_Wordpress_Gallery id=”4″ gal_title=”Red Foxes in Ocean City 2015″]center_img __________If you have your own photos of red foxes in Ocean City, use the hashtag #OCNJRedFox to post them to social media or send a copy to OCNJ Daily at [email protected]__________ A sign at Brown’s asks customers not to feed the foxes. Credit: Noel WirthA sampling of Facebook posts:Alison Everson Malloy: There was one on 54th street and Asbury on Friday night — it was stalking a cat. We watched it go from West up to Central. A lady we met said there’s a den up at 54th and beach.Michelle Flack: Mike was jogging very early in the a.m. last week or the week before and he was alone on the boards — then he spotted the fox — as he got closer, the fox stared at him and Mike turned around and went the other way.Marc Bon: Saw one cruising 34th st. And Roosevelt Blvd near the pkwy.Bill Griffith: They are all over Somers Point. Had one in my yard the other night. Quite healthy.Fran Hummer: I saw this fox when bicycling on the boardwalk a few weeks ago.Beth Videtto-Viola: There was a whole family of foxes over by the high-rise condos Memorial Day Weekend and somebody was feeding them.Darlina McCormick: Jim and Gabe saw one yesterday at 52nd St beach. I guess he was checking out the new sand.last_img read more

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Tesco breads grow

first_imgTesco’s bakery sales are ahead of budget and up year-on-year, category manager Andy Brocklehurst told British Baker this week.Speaking after the supermarket reported record sales, as it delivered its Christmas trading statement last week, Brocklehurst said there had been good growth across the bakery category. Sales growth was driven by speciality and Finest branded own-label premium breads, he revealed. But the supermarket also saw good growth in branded bread and cakes.Tesco is gearing up to relaunch its in-store bakery ranges at the end of February, Brocklehurst said. It will then relaunch its cakes in March and morning goods in June and July.Brocklehurst said there was a move towards removing additives colours and flavours in Tesco bakery. He commented that organic was an area that was set to grow. “Organic is not as big as it should be in bakery,” he said. “It’s something we will address.”Last week, Tesco said it saw strong growth and record sales over the Christmas and New Year period. Group sales, excluding petrol, increased by 9.9% in the six weeks to 6 January 2007.It added in its statement: “Many customers chose from our Tesco Finest and organic ranges over the period. Sales of fresh organic foods were up by 39%, and Finest meat and poultry sales grew by over 55%.”last_img read more

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Galactic Brings The Funk To Brooklyn Bowl

first_imgNew Orleans funk favorites Galactic have been around the block, playing festivals and iconic venues left and right, but they clearly feel right at home at Brooklyn Bowl. Their annual mid-summer run at the Williamsburg staple always feels like a giant Jazz Fest reunion, and last night was no exception.Vocalist Erica Falls dominated the stage for much of the show. The powerhouse is essentially part of the band at this point, adding another level of deeply soulful flavor to the 5-piece ensemble. Longtime touring trombonist Corey Henry helped keep energy levels through the roof throughout the horn-heavy NOLA dance party.The band cycled through their career-spanning catalogue, tackling newer tunes off their most recent release Into the Deep, while getting the crowd hyped with all the classics like “Hey Na Na” and “Heart of Steel”. The New Orleans spirit in the room last night was palpable.The funk outfit will return to the Bowl for the second and final night of the run this evening.Photos by Mark Dershowitz: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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The future energy mix

first_imgShell Oil Co. President Marvin Odum said he expects global energy demand to double by mid-century, with renewable sources making up a much greater part of the supply than they do now, and with fossil fuels remaining a major part of the mix.Odum, who spoke Tuesday (April 27) at the Science Center, delivering the Harvard University Center for the Environment’s final “Future of Energy” lecture of the academic year, presented his views and those of the oil industry giant as it looks ahead.According to Odum, energy from renewable sources would surge in the coming decades, to a scale that today would equal 60 percent of production. But with the global population expected to climb to 9 billion and the increasing industrialization of the developing world, he expected overall demand to grow enough that renewable sources will make up just 30 percent of the 2050 energy mix.Much of the rest, he said, must come from fossil fuels, making mitigation technologies that keep carbon from being released into the atmosphere essential.“Supply is going to have trouble keeping up with that kind of demand growth,” Odum said. “All forms of energy will be needed.”Consequently, environmental stresses due to energy consumption also will increase, Odum said, resulting in more government regulation. He came to Harvard, in fact, expecting to talk about the new U.S. energy and climate bill, but negotiations on it collapsed last week when one of the sponsors, Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, abruptly withdrew from talks with Democrats. Though the halt was surprising, Odum said he still expects some type of energy legislation to be passed.The global energy industry is so enormous that major changes take a lot of time, Odum said. A look at the past century shows that it takes almost 30 years for any new energy source to reach even 1 percent of the market, he said. First come years of research and development, followed by small demonstration plants that lead to further improvements. That is followed by larger commercial plants that take a long time to site and build. Biofuels are now about 1 percent of the market, and wind will be about 1 percent by the middle of the decade.That slow development pattern will have to be radically sped up, he said, if renewables are to be 30 percent of the mid-century energy mix. Government can help, with regulations and incentives. Odum said that government establishment of a carbon market, with pricing and trading, will be a big factor driving growth of renewable energy sources. Without that, he said, it will be difficult to attract the kind of private capital needed to finance that growth, and it is unlikely government will step in to fill the gap.Odum said he sees the industry having several roles to play in the future. First, it needs to provide more energy to meet demand. Second, it needs to increase the efficiency of its operations. Third, it needs to provide more low-carbon energy.Carbon capture and storage is an example of the third role, Odum said. Shell has begun one such large project associated with its oil sands effort in Canada. It’s being done in partnership with the Canadian government, which has invested $800 million. He expects to begin injecting carbon into underground storage areas by 2015 at the earliest.Another example is Shell’s continued investment in natural gas. Though a fossil fuel, gas produces much less carbon dioxide than either oil or coal. By 2012, natural gas is expected to make up more than half of Shell’s production.Odum said the company expects the number of motor vehicles to double worldwide by mid-century, with 40 percent of miles driven by electric-powered vehicles. That expected explosion in demand for transportation fuels has Shell investing in biofuels, working with a producer in Brazil.Though Shell was not involved, Odum also addressed the recent Gulf of Mexico oil drilling platform tragedy and the spill that has resulted. Such platforms, he said, have so many redundant systems that he doesn’t understand how the tragedy happened. Whether the accident and the resultant oil pollution affects the acceptability of offshore drilling elsewhere depends on how the situation is resolved and how successful mitigation efforts are, he said.last_img read more

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Health care reform undoing ‘job lock’

first_imgThe Affordable Care Act is providing a cure for the phenomenon known as “job lock” — when a worker stays in a position solely for employer-sponsored health insurance. That’s according to Katherine Swartz, professor of health policy and economics at Harvard School of Public Health, and Theda Skocpol of Harvard University, authors of a February 6, 2014 USA Today editorial.They cite Government Accountability Office research that found that workers dependent on their employers for health insurance coverage were more reluctant to change jobs or start a business than those who are/were not. Now with the option to buy coverage through a health insurance exchange, the number of Americans opting for self-employment or for working reduced hours to care for family members is expected to increase.This is a positive step for the economy, according to the authors, because “job market flexibility spurs innovation and economic growth.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Notre Dame responds to Harvard education report

first_imgThe Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Making Caring Common project issued “Turning the Tide,” a report aimed at remaking the college admissions process into a means of encouraging genuine ethical and intellectual engagement in high school and college-age students, on Jan. 20. Admissions personnel from various top-tier universities, including Cornell University and Dartmouth College, have signed the report, endorsing its contents. Donald Bishop, associate vice president for undergraduate enrollment at Notre Dame, said the document was not widely distributed and thus, the University did not have the opportunity to sign it.“The admissions process should both clearly signal that concern for others and the common good are highly valued in admissions and describe what kinds of service, contributions and engagement are most likely to lead to responsible work, caring relationships and ethical citizenship,” the report stated.The document goes on to outline recommendations to achieve these goals. According to the report, the admissions process should place a large emphasis on meaningful community service and should prioritize the quality, not the quantity, of activities participated in while in high school.“Applications should state plainly that students should feel no pressure to report more than two or three substantive extracurricular activities and should discourage students from reporting activities that have not been meaningful to them,” the report stated.“We are going to reach out to Harvard and look at what they have said in this preliminary report,” Bishop said. “Over the next two years, they are going to work out the details and we are going to offer to get involved.”Bishop said he feels that the University already does a great job of conveying the message of the Harvard report.“There was a statement in there, early on, that said while some schools already do this [emphasize the selection of civically and intellectually engaged students], many do not — we are one of the schools that already does this,” Bishop said. “We are in alignment with what they want to see other schools do — we already do. That is why we want to join in, because we think that we can be helpful to them.”Bishop is in the process of writing a response to the report but said Notre Dame sets itself apart from other schools through its ongoing commitment to recruiting students whose character demonstrate the Notre Dame mission of educating “mind, body and spirit.”“A lot of what the Harvard process is what other schools should value, we have always valued,” Bishop said. “We have talked about our values [and] we try to reward that if we can identify that in the application.“… So as a group of students, you all are really wanting to do the right things and serve others, but you are also highly skilled and you have really intellectualized your lives. You like to think, and I think that thinking and doing, putting those together, Notre Dame students do quite well,” he said. “That is what we are looking for in our applicant pool: people that will think through and then act on their thoughts and want to not just become an expert in some academic or intellectual field, but also help make a difference.”Tags: Admissions, Harvard education reportlast_img read more

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Missing Jamestown Teen Returned Home

first_imgJAMESTOWN – A more than six months long search for a missing 14-year-old who ran away from home has ended.Jamestown Police Captain Robert Samuelson on Monday said Gianna Coleman returned home last week.Coleman, according to police, first went missing February 13.Between then and now she was reportedly in contact with her family on a daily basis via social media. This was not the first time Coleman was reported missing. Police say she has been reported missing multiple times over the past several years including last October. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Roaches Still Sickening

first_imgRemember when you spray that roaches like crevices. They prefer for their backs andlegs to touch the surface at the same time. “Roaches have survived for more than 300 million years,” said Paul Guillebeau, anentomologist with the University of Georgia Extension Service. “They have changedvery little, according to fossil evidence.” Cockroaches need three things to form a population: food, moisture and shelter. “They’re very effective, so you may not need to use as many pesticides as we oncedid,” Guillebeau said. “However, if you already have a large roach population, you’llprobably have to spray some kind of pesticide.” They range from about a half-inch for German cockroaches to two inches for smokeybrown adults. Recent reports that cities like Los Angeles, New York, Miami and Atlanta have roachproblems don’t surprise many. Roaches are an age-old problem, and they don’t seem tobe going away. “You usually find larger populations in cities,” he said, “due to the number ofapartment buildings. And the climate has some effect.” “Some roaches come in from outdoors, like smokey browns, and they like warmclimates,” Guillebeau said. “Others like German cockroaches live almost exclusivelyindoors, and the outdoor climate doesn’t matter to them.” “Be scrupulously clean,” Guillebeau said. “Even a crumb is a feast for a cockroach.” So how do you keep a population of roaches from taking over your home?center_img A study by Combat Insect Control Systems ranked Atlanta as the 12th mostcockroach-infested city in the nation. Los Angeles topped the list. The study was basedon 1996 sales of roach control products. He also warns you to quickly fix leaks in the kitchen or bath, because even smallamounts of water will attract roaches. “Apartment buildings usually provide all of these,” he said. “Once a few getestablished, it doesn’t take long for a huge population to form.” He recommends cleaning the kitchen every night and putting away all food, includingpet food. “Roaches like pet food as much as your pet does,” he said. Some factors out of your control, such as climate, attract roaches, too. To help get rid of roach populations, some new roach baits are now on the market. Roaches come in more than 3,500 varieties. But you can tell most from other bugs bytheir flat, long, tinny, oval-shaped, brown bodies. The adults typically have wings. “The most common varieties in the United Sates are the German, brown-banded,American, Oriental and smokey brown cockroaches,” Guillebeau said.last_img read more

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Farm outlook

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaNet farm income for Georgia farmers in 2005 probably won’t be as good as in 2004. But it should be a little better than earlier this decade, according to the University of Georgia 2005 Georgia Farm Outlook and Planning Guide.Georgia farmers can expect to get about the same prices in 2005 as they did in 2004 for certain commodities. But prices for others could be worse, according to the report compiled by the agricultural and applied economics department of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Peanut demandPeanut farmers can expect early contract prices to be lower than the $400 per ton they got in 2004, said Nathan Smith, a peanut economist with the UGA Extension Service.”When prices for other commodities are low,” he said, “peanut prices tend to go lower, too.”This is now the fourth peanut crop under the federal peanut program that replaced the old quota-based system. Prices have remained stable under this program, Smith said, due mostly to the steady balance between supply and demand.Georgia planted about 620,000 acres in 2004. Due to forecasted lower prices in other crops, farmers may plant more peanuts in 2005, Smith said. This would increase the supply and possibly lower prices.Demand for U.S. peanuts continues to grow, he said. It’s expected to be about 5.5 percent higher in 2005. U.S. consumers used 3.9 billion pounds of peanuts in 2004.Cotton questionableGeorgia cotton farmers had a good crop last year, despite being battered by tropical storms. The state’s farmers picked around 1.8 million bales. But the United States had a record year of 22.8 million bales. China produced a large crop, too, about 30 million bales. (A bale is roughly 450 pounds of cotton lint.)Cotton prices now are about 40 cents per pound, Shurley said. They could reach as high as 50 cents per pound in 2005. But if the world produces another large crop, they could drop to around 30 cents.”Because of all the stock left over from 2004,” said Don Shurley, a cotton economist with the UGA Extension Service, “it may be midsummer before a clearer picture can be made on what prices will be around harvest.”Two of every three bales of cotton grown in the United States will have to find a foreign buyer, Shurley said. Georgia farmers will have to produce cotton the world wants to buy.Stable cattleGeorgia cattlemen should have another good year in 2005, said Curt Lacy, a UGA Extension Service livestock economist. Good U.S. beef demand coupled with “snug” cattle supplies should keep prices steady to a little higher for cattlemen.Prices should average around $1.05 per pound for Georgia steers around 500 pounds and 92 cents per pound for feeder steers around 700 pounds.”These prices assume we don’t have any major market disruptions (such as a U.S. case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy),” Lacy said.Soybeans sinkA large soybean crop in 2004 has led to a big supply. Because of this, prices are expected to be lower in 2005.Prices this year will probably be around $5.06 to $5.15 per bushel, according to the report. Soybean prices in early 2004 soared close to $10 a bushel in some parts of the country. Prices in 2005 will depend greatly on how South America’s crop turns out.A potentially devastating soybean disease, Asiatic rust, showed up in the U.S. Southeast in late 2004, too late to hurt the crop. But farmers and buyers are waiting to see how the disease will affect the 2005 crop.According to the report, borrowing rates to finance farmland and fixed asset investments will remain good for farmers in early 2005.Details about these and other Georgia crops can be found in the outlook guide next week at www.agecon.uga.edu.last_img read more

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