Apple TV sales hit the 1m mark

first_imgTuesday 21 December 2010 8:15 pm Tags: NULL whatsapp Apple TV sales hit the 1m mark Apple expects sales of Apple TV to top 1m units this week, showing that the device is gaining traction in bringing the Web to TV. Apple also said yesterday that iTunes users are now renting and buying more than 400,000 TV shows and more than 150,000 movies per day.“One million is a real benchmark,” said Daniel Ernst, an analyst with Hudson Square Research. “To put it in perspective, they are within shooting range of some of the smaller cable operators like Cablevision with 3m subscribers.” Share Show Comments ▼ Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily ProofBack on the Rails for Summer New York to New Orleans, Savannah and MiamiFamily ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofHomemade Tomato Soup: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof whatsapp KCS-content last_img read more

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Graham Kings named mission theologian in the Anglican Communion

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Feb 17, 2015 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion, [Anglican Communion News Service] The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Church Mission Society and Durham University have become partners in creating an innovative seven-year post: Mission Theologian in the Anglican Communion.The purpose is to research, stimulate, connect and publish works of theology in the Anglican Communion, with particular focus on insights from Africa, Asia and Latin America, in their ecumenical contexts.The Rt Rev. Graham Kings, currently bishop of Sherborne, has been appointed and will take up this new post in July 2015. He will be based in London, visiting Durham University, as an honorary fellow, and will travel in the Anglican Communion. He will convene a series of seminars in Anglican Communion studies for theologians, particularly in Africa, Asia and Latin America. A new website, launched today, MissionTheologyAngCom.org, will publish the papers.The Archbishop of Canterbury said, “I am delighted that this strong partnership has developed with CMS and Durham University. It is very gratifying that the concept of a Mission Theologian in the Anglican Communion has attracted the necessary support to get to this stage where the post can be established. I know that the Anglican Communion has many gifted theologians and it is so important that their voice is heard more widely. I am glad that Bishop Graham’s experience and knowledge of the Communion is being made so generously available and I shall encourage the development of this project with a keen interest.”The Rev. Professor Joseph Galgalo, vice chancellor of St. Paul’s University, Limuru, Kenya, said, “This partnership affords new and creative ways of initiating and managing theological discourses across the Communion; and equally provides opportunities for constructive engagements. Bishop Graham Kings, with his vast experience in cross-cultural mission, is well placed to build a wide network of theologians to stimulate fruitful theological conversations, and to inspire partnerships across communities of faith. I wish him well and all God’s blessings as he lays the foundation for this exciting responsibility.”Canon Philip Mounstephen, executive leader of the Church Mission Society, said, “CMS has long been committed to enabling the theological insights and voices of the global south to be better heard around the world as together we explore, and learn more, of the mission of God. I’m thrilled with this new post in CMS.”Professor Alec Ryrie, head of the Department of Theology and Religion, Durham University, said: “This partnership is exactly the kind of creative enterprise that we should be entering into, to make more of the fresh and important theological thinking taking place in areas which are sometimes remote to readily accessible scholarship. Our leading research and alumni networks can hopefully bring emphasis and credibility to this initiative. We are delighted to welcome Dr Kings as an Honorary Fellow in the Department.”Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan, interim secretary general of the Anglican Communion, said: “Bishop Graham is well known to the Anglican Communion Office, through his participation in the interfaith network of the Anglican Communion. I am excited that this new post, although not based in the ACO, will complement our work in mission and theological studies. My colleagues and I look forward to working in partnership with him.”The Rt. Rev. Nicholas Holtam, bishop of Salisbury, said, “I am very grateful for all that Bishop Graham has contributed to the Diocese of Salisbury as Bishop of Sherborne. This new post makes very good use of his experience, knowledge and skills. We give thanks for him and Alison and ask God’s blessing on all that lies ahead.”The Rt. Rev. Graham Kings said, “I am amazed at this creative post, and give thanks to God. I am also deeply grateful to the Archbishop of Canterbury, CMS and Durham University and to the wide range of supporting donors. Henry Venn, the great 19th Century General Secretary of CMS, talked of ‘self-supporting, self-governing and self-extending churches’ throughout the world. For many years, more recently, there has been a ‘fourth self’: ‘self-theologising’. It is these voices which need to be heard more clearly throughout the Communion.”Funds for this new post have largely come from a wide range of private donors, from various traditions in the world-wide Church of God, as well as from the Church Mission Society, which will be employing Dr Kings from 16 July 2015.www.MissionTheologyAngCom.org and @MissioTheology are both launched today. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC People Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Graham Kings named mission theologian in the Anglican Communion Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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Legal lynchings soar under Trump

first_imgIn an unprecedented spree of executions, Donald Trump has executed 13 people in the last six months of his presidency. As if in a frenzy to kill, Trump had three people put to death at the federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Ind., just days before he exits the White House. Protest against the execution of Dustin Higgs at Martin Luther King Jr. statue in Houston, Jan. 15.WW PHOTO: Gloria RubacAccording to common sense, as well as various courts’ rulings including the U.S. Supreme Court, the last three people should never have been on death row or executed.The three people executed between Jan. 12 and 15 were Lisa Montgomery, Corey Johnson and Dustin Higgs.Montgomery’s life was one of horror, as she was sex-trafficked by her mother as a child and raped by her stepfather and his friends for years. Montgomery’s mother traded sex with her in exchange for paying bills or for repairs on their house.Montgomery’s lawyers asked the courts to declare her incompetent in an effort to block her execution, citing serious mental illness, neurological impairment and complex trauma. The Supreme Court had found in 1986 that executing the “insane” was illegal in a case called Ford v. Wainwright. That ruling said people would be entitled to a competency evaluation and an evidentiary hearing in court, so it could be determined if they were competent to be executed. Montgomery was denied fairness by the very court that made this ruling when SCOTUS allowed her execution to go forward. Hers was the first federal execution of a woman since Bonnie Brown Heady was put to death in the gas chamber for kidnapping and murder and Ethel Rosenberg was electrocuted for espionage, both 68 years ago.Another illegal executionOn Jan. 14, Corey Johnson, an African American man, became the 12th victim of the execution spree. He was a person with a proven intellectual disability and should never have been sentenced to death. In a statement, his lawyers Donald Salzman and Ronald Tabak said the government has executed a person “with an intellectual disability, in stark violation of the Constitution and federal law” and vehemently denied he had the mental capacity to be a so-called “drug kingpin.”On Dec. 30, 2020, his attorneys sent a clemency appeal to the president, stating: “Corey Johnson is intellectually disabled and cannot constitutionally be executed . . . Corey Johnson remained in the second grade for three years and also repeated the third and fourth grades. When asked his birthday at age eight, while in second grade, he thought it was in March, though he was actually born in November. When he was 13 years old, he could barely write his own name. “And while he knew there were 12 months in the year, he could recite them only up to August. Corey was not able to tell time or perform arithmetic beyond a third-grade level . . . When he was in his early 20s, achievement testing measured his grade-equivalent levels no higher than second grade in reading and writing. When he was last tested at age 45, Mr. Johnson was still at an elementary school level. As an adolescent and teenager, Corey functioned like a younger child — he struggled to prepare snacks for himself, wet his bed until he was 12 and could not be trusted to roam school halls without getting lost.”Johnson’s last words were, “I want to say that I am sorry for my crimes. I wanted to say that to the families who were victimized by my actions, and I want these names to be remembered: Louis Johnson, Anthony Carter, Dorothy Armstrong, Curtis Thorne, Linwood Chiles, Peyton Johnson, Bobby Long. I would have said I was sorry before, but I didn’t know how. I hope you will find peace. To my family, I have always loved you, and your love has made me real . . . I am not the same man that I was . . . thanks to my legal team. Don has been more than a lawyer, he has become a friend . . .  I am okay. I am at peace.”Killing on MLK’s birthdayDustin Diggs in prison library.On Jan. 15, the birthday of civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., another African American man — Dustin Higgs — was executed. Reactions to an execution on King’s birthday were swift and harsh. At a protest in Houston, longtime activist Deloyd Parker, executive director of the S.H.A.P.E. Community Center for over 50 years, reacted to this execution, saying, “It is no accident that this is happening on Dr. King’s birthday. The S.H.A.P.E. family feels that the federal government, led by President Trump, is desecrating the memory of Dr. King by carrying out any execution on his birthday. We should all be honoring his fight to bring justice for our community, not defaming him by having an execution.”Higgs was involved in a crime, but did not kill anyone. The actual killer received a life sentence.Some activists are counting on the new president, Joe Biden, to get rid of the federal death penalty. Biden helped write the infamous 1994 crime bill that added 60 federal crimes for which a person could be put to death. What he does as president remains to be seen.But it must be noted that there are now 49 people on the federal death row compared to the 2,500+ on state death rows.Even if Biden commutes every federal death sentence to life in prison, these facts, from the Death Penalty Information Center, remain:The death penalty is racist, and one is more likely to be sentenced to death if a white person is killed.92 of the 174 people who were proven innocent and exonerated from death row are Black.Public opinion polls show that support for the death penalty is currently near historic lows, after peaking in 1994 and declining over the last 25 years.Our task is to abolish the death penalty. It is racist. It does not deter crime. Actually, it is the crime. The death penalty is guilty on all counts. Let’s shut it down! FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Familiar Harvest Story in North Central Indiana

first_img Familiar Harvest Story in North Central Indiana kevin-wilson-harvest-updateIn north-central Indiana, Cass County farmers are experiencing a familiar 2016 harvest story. The soybean crop is fantastic and corn yield doesn’t quite measure up. Walton farmer Kevin Wilson says so far in the 300 acres of corn harvested yields have been good, but not great or wonderful.“At one time I think we all had expectations that this might be the yields of all yields, and I don’t think we’re seeing that, but we’re seeing good yields through here. Compared to what we had last year, they are really good yields, but we’ll see what the rest of the crops brings.”He said disease issues haven’t been much of a problem in the corn yet. The biggest knock on yield may well be the storms in the area earlier in the year.“We’ve had some isolated areas in the Kokomo area where we had the tornados come through in August and even some areas around there where we had a real heavy wind and rain burst that knocked some corn down. There are some of those issues going on in our area, and until we can get it all harvested I guess we won’t know exactly where we end up.”But the soybean yields have been outstanding, and Wilson says he realized this could happen about the mid to late August timeframe.“We were like a lot of areas in north-central Indiana,” he told HAT. “We had not received much rain at all in July. We weren’t quite as bad as a few other spots but certainly the grass was brown and things were a little concerning for the soybean crop. But we started getting some rains and one thing we did see a little bit as we moved into a little later maturing beans, those rains that we received were a little bit more beneficial to them.”Wilson says the bean yields for 2016 are at levels they would be pleased to see each and every year. By Andy Eubank – Oct 10, 2016 Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Familiar Harvest Story in North Central Indiana SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleIndiana Farm Bureau Names Brooks and Bucshon a ‘Friend of Farm Bureau’Next articleMorning Outlook Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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Election essentials prep course preview

first_imgFacebook Twitter + posts Previous articleTCU Athletics Weekend RoundupNext articleShep’s Off the Hook Seafood offers new dining options Brittany Kasko RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Brittany is the Executive Producer of The Leap for TCU360. She is a journalism major and criminal justice minor from Mansfield, Texas. In her free time, Brittany enjoys exercising and catching up on pop culture. The Leap 2/11/20 The Leap 3/3/20 ReddIt Welcome TCU Class of 2025 TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Brittany Kaskohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/brittany-kasko/ The Leap 2/18/20 Linkedincenter_img ReddIt Brittany Kaskohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/brittany-kasko/ Facebook World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution printIf you’re confused about the finger points or even the big picture of the upcoming midterm elections, TCU has a class that can help.Dr. James Riddlesperger, a political science professor, will the discuss the potential impact of the midterm election on the next two years on Tuesday from 6-8 p.m.Riddlesperger said the talk is meant to help people understand the election, its importance and ultimately help voters comprehend the process better. The class, which costs $47, is sponsored by the Center for Texas Studies and TCU Extended Education and is open to the public.Midterm elections can be a tough topic for many to understand due to the capacity and lack of importance, as many would say, in year’s past. Early voting is at a record pace, as voters cast ballots in critical races such as the U.S. Senate contest between incumbent Republican Ted Cruz and Democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke.Dr. Riddlesperger has over 35 years of experience in politics. Photo via TCU Addran College of Liberal Arts.“I’ve never voted in the midterm elections because I didn’t know what the point was and it was never made a big deal in year’s past,” said Ashlyn Therkelsen, a junior biology major. “With all of the media attention in this year’s election and the importance surrounding it, I will definitely be voting.”Riddlesperger said that anyone who wants to discuss the election and the topics within it, especially Texas candidates and issues, might enjoy the evening. Linkedin Brittany Kasko Brittany Kaskohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/brittany-kasko/ The Leap 2/4/20 Brittany Kaskohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/brittany-kasko/ Twitterlast_img read more

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War Memorial is a symbol of inclusiveness and enlightenment

first_imgNewsCommunityWar Memorial is a symbol of inclusiveness and enlightenmentBy Staff Reporter – August 11, 2017 2374 World Wars memorial on Pery Square. Picture: Cian ReinhardtLimerick War Memorial on Pery Square. Picture: Cian ReinhardtIt has been bombed, boycotted and condemned as a symbol of British imperialism, yet the Limerick War Memorial in Pery Square is a potent reminder that the legacy of loss from the First World War transcends religious, political and social divisions. Dr Tadhg Moloney tells the story of how the memorial survived revisionism, ignorance and prejudice.Eleven years after the end of the First World War, in which at least 3,000 officers and men from Limerick City and County died, a memorial in their honour and a place where the ex-servicemen and people of Limerick could come to pay homage was unveiled.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The conditions created by the War of Independence and Civil War meant it was only in 1924 that Roman Catholic ex-servicemen could hold a service of remembrance at St. Joseph’s Church. They continued to use this church until 1927 when the ceremony was transferred to St. John’s Cathedral.By the time Remembrance Day came in 1922, a memorial had been unveiled in St. Mary’s Cathedral to the ‘Men of Thomond who fell in the war 1914-1918’. However, because this was a Protestant church, the attendance of Roman Catholic ex-servicemen was precluded. Six years later another memorial was unveiled, this time in the Presbyterian Church, Lower Mallow Street.Personal memorials had been erected by families to their sons who died in the war, most notably in St Mary’s Cathedral. One of those is in memory of Captain Gordon Thompson Shaw killed in action on August 28, 1918, serving with the Royal Munster Fusiliers. He was the son of Alexander William Shaw, a leading bacon merchant in Limerick City.The only memorial to a Limerick Roman Catholic soldier killed in the First World War is to be found in St. Munchin’s Roman Catholic Church.  This memorial is in the form of a baptistery and was donated by Sir Vincent and Lady Nash to the memory of their son, Lieutenant James Haran Nash, who was killed serving with the Irish Guards on March 27, 1918.Limerick still lacked a suitable monument where people irrespective of religious persuasion could commemorate their war dead.However, on June 6, 1928 a deputation consisting of two members of the Limerick Branch of the Legion of ex-Servicemen, Captains David Tidmarsh and Eric R. Shaw, who was also a Borough Councillor, appeared before the Corporation Improvement Committee to support their application for the erection of a suitable memorial. The following day a letter was read to a full meeting of the Corporation from the Chairman of the Limerick Branch of the British Legion, which included a scale drawing of Pery Square and the location of where they would like the memorial to be erected covering an area of four square yards.Permission was granted to erect the memorial in the Square by twenty-two votes to four, with Councillor C Gilligan abstaining, giving his reason for doing so on the basis that he was ‘opposed to the memorial on national grounds’. Those who voted against the proposal wanted the memorial situated in the People’s Park. There may also have been an underlying motive in having it located in the People’s Park and that was ‘out of sight, out of mind’. Councillor P O’Callaghan threatened to have it pulled down when it was erected.Another indication that a public war memorial was going to be erected in Limerick was made at an Armistice dinner in the British Legion Hall, Lower Hartstonge Street on November 14, 1928 when Irish Legion Chairman A.P Connolly declared that ‘they were at last to have their war memorial in Limerick, a fact that reflected honour on the generous people of that city and county.  Such a memorial would keep the grand ideal for which the men had fallen before them, and be an inspiration to them in the future’.A list of subscribers published on November 9, 1929 showed that £357.10s.0d. had been contributed towards the required amount of £550.  The willingness of people to subscribe is shown by a further list, published a month later, showing that the amount contributed had risen to £469.1s.0d, leaving an outstanding debt of £80.19s.0d.Many of the 157 subscribers had relatives killed in the war or had served during the conflict. The individual amounts were not disclosed, signifying that the subscribers paid whether small or large were of equal importance.The site for the memorial, a 20-foot version of the Cross of Sacrifice on an octagonal base with a bronze sword on its shaft, was donated by the City Council in the middle of the square directly opposite the Carnegie Library.  Designed by Sir Reginald Bloomfield and constructed by Messrs CW Harrison and Sons, it was built of finely chiselled white Irish granite, of which one of the parts is mica, a material that sparkles in the sun or artificial light and bore the following inscription:To the glory of God, and to the memory of 3,000 officers, NCOs and men of Limerick City and County who fell in the Great War, 1914-18. They died in every quarter of the earth and on its seas, and their names have with reverence and love been inscribed on our rolls of honour. Most of them lie buried in the lands of our Allies, who have set aside their resting place in honour for ever.On November 10, 1929, both Catholic and Protestant ex-servicemen held separate services after which they marched to the memorial. The Protestant service was held in St. Mary’s Cathedral where ‘the sacred edifice had been filled to overflowing by a congregation representing all Protestant denominations in the city and county’ many of whom were ex-Servicemen, wearing their medals and decorations. A wreath on behalf of the Limerick Branch of the British Legion was laid at the Thomond War Memorial by Major-General Sir George Franks. The memorial Mass was held in St John’s Cathedral after which least six hundred ex-Servicemen, preceded by the Sarsfield Fife and Drum Band marched from John’s Square to Pery Square where a large crowd had gathered, including many women wearing their deceased husband’s, father’s or brother’s medals and decorations.President of the British Legion in the Irish Free State Major-General Sir William Hickie, who had commanded the 16th Irish Division in France during the First World War and was therefore well known to and respected by the general body of the Ex-Servicemen present, unveiled the Cross which had been covered with a purple drape, symbolising the sacrifice of the men that the memorial commemorated.In his address, he stressed that the sacrifice of the men to whom the memorial was erected was made for the highest motives and he made particular mention of the defence of Belgium. He also insisted that the basic motivation of the Allies in going to war had been honourable and made a plea for tolerance and understanding of differing points of view which he noted were absent in contemporary Ireland but which the occasion showed existed, as they always had, in Limerick:“It is most fitting that this ancient city should have within its boundaries a monument which will not only stand to the glorious memory of those of her gallant sons who gave their lives in the cause of freedom and justice in the Great War, but will also serve to remind everyone of the great number of men from the County of Limerick, and from this its capital city, who took a distinguished part in the campaign of the Great War, and of the exemplary and gallant manner in which they carried out their self imposed duties. What we want most in Ireland to-day is that brotherly spirit which will recognise that we are all Irishmen of one great family, who are striving according to our lights, to do our best for the country which we love. Opinions and methods may differ, but nothing is to be gained by unkind criticism, by harsh words, or by wilful misunderstanding. Limerick has always set an example of that broad-mindedness and of that kindly spirit which are also, so noticeably absent at times from our public life. The cross now takes its place with the three crosses of Irish granite which stand respectively at Wytschaete in Flanders, at Guillemont and on the Somme in France and on the Serbian heights above Lake Doiran, as lasting memorials to those fifty thousand of our comrades who went out and who did not come back.” While no wreath was laid on behalf of the Catholic Church quite a number of clergy were present at the ceremony, some of whom were ex-Chaplains to the army during the war. There was no official representation by the City Council at the ceremony. Although they had received an invitation, the Mayor decided that the vote to officially attend was unsuccessful ‘when four members voted for not accepting the invitation and seven for accepting.The only member of the Council who attend in a private capacity was Alderman P O’Flynn.The attendance of the Mayor and Council in an official capacity at the unveiling ceremony was obviously a step too far.It wasn’t until 1991, sixty-two years after the unveiling before Mayor Jim Kemmy attended and laid a wreath on behalf of the city council, thereby establishing a precedent that has continued to this day.The ex-Servicemen now had a place to go to pay homage to their fallen comrades. Every year, with the exception of the years 1939-45, they assembled at the Cross on the nearest Sunday to the eleventh day of November, the date of the end of the war.After the Second World War, a plaque was added to the war memorial to commemorate the Limerick men from Limerick who were killed in action serving with the Allies during that conflict.Not everyone agreed with what the war memorial symbolised or the sentiments expressed on it and during the early hours of  August 7, 1957 it was destroyed by an explosion. The Secretary of the Limerick Branch of the British Legion, Mr John Ring, declared that the war memorial ‘had no political significance and was merely there to commemorate our Limerick men who were killed in the First World War and also in the Second World War.  That was the only purpose of it’.The day after the explosion, the Limerick Chronicle published a disclaimer from ‘the local Secretary of a Proscribed organisation stating that the organisation was not responsible for the blowing up of the War Memorial and that no member of the Republican Movement was involved in the incident’.No group or individuals ever took responsibility for this action and nobody was apprehended for it, though its occurrence during the IRA border campaign pointed to the most likely source. The death of Limerick man Seán Sabhat the previous January may also have been a relevant factor.However, like the phoenix rising from the ashes, a new war memorial was built on the base of the old Cross of Sacrifice to symbolise a new era of inclusion and enlightenment.Read similar articles in the Limerick Post Community section. Print Previous articleUL Eagles basketball aim to soar back to top tierNext articleEVA International Director reacts to funding criticism Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Linkedincenter_img Email Twitter Facebook WhatsApplast_img read more

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RTE reveal Donegal is worst for waste spending

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook By News Highland – June 18, 2018 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Pinterest Twitter Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR RTE reveal Donegal is worst for waste spending For the last six months RTÉ Investigates went undercover investigating the ever increasing problem of illegal dumping and how councils regulate and prosecute waste offenders.Donegal proved the poorest performing council in Ireland for its inspection rate of its facilities and for its investment in waste services.Between 2014 and 2016 Donegal had just two members of staff to regulate the 44 waste permits in the area.Between 2015 and 2016 Donegal spent €4.20 per person on waste management, planning and regulation services compared to the national average of €17.22, less than every other local authority compared to the amount of people living there.Reporter with RTE Conor Ryan was speaking ahead of tonight’s documentary Ireland’s Wild Waste:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/cofgfgfgffgnorraw.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction WhatsApp Previous articleCharlotte Caldwell urges reform over medical cannabisNext articleOne final push to get Inishowen looking its best News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 In a statement to RTÉ Investigates, Donegal County Council said the analysis does not reflect all of its efforts in the area of waste management and enforcement but that it has secured funding to hire extra staff.It added Donegal County Council remains committed to addressing waste management issues and will continue its efforts to do so. Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

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People

first_imgNoelPatterson has been appointed personnel director at the Red Bull Company. Hefirst started working at the group as a consultant in the summer of 2001, whenhe implemented a change programme. In his new role, he will direct all HRactivity for the UK and Ireland as well as having an influence in the company’sinternational operations.Howdid you get involved with Red Bull?Ibegan working with Red Bull as a consultant to prepare and implement thedevelopment of the company from a marketing-based business of 30 people, to aclosely-integrated sales and marketing organisation of more than 170.Whatare your main duties?Todirect all HR and related issues for Red Bull in the UK and Ireland, as well asliaison with Red Bull International operations based in Austria.Whatdo you want to achieve in the role?Maintainingthe creativity, passion and innovation of Red Bull, while adding a strongcommercial focus and direction through the training, development andrecruitment of great people.What’sthe best thing about HR?Theopportunity to be involved in all areas of business activity, both formally andinformally. Compared to other management disciplines, so little of yourexperience and knowledge base loses its relevance. There’s also the relief ofnot being benchmarked or measured as much as the rest of the business.Whatare you most excited about?Enablingthe exceptional talent we have recruited with the business during the past yearto blend and complement those who have given Red Bull its success to date.Howwill you use HR to impact the bottom line?Bygiving structure and insight to develop the commercial value and impact of ourpeople, while ensuring the Red Bull culture, which drives our innovation andsuccess, remains paramount.Whatabout your personal life?Iam married with three boys under 12 so I am an expert in World WrestlingEntertainmentª moves, Playstation cheats and contemporary names for bodilyfunctions. I enjoy playing the sports I can still manage (like skiing or squash),and drinking while watching those I can’t. A fun and socially-active workingenvironment is one of the best ways to cope with the challenges of work andhome life.CV2002Personnel director, the Red Bull Company1994Various roles including personnel director, Matthew Clark Plc1992Judge, Institute of Management, Cambridge University1988Employee relations manager, Grand Metropolitan Brewing 1980Employee relations adviser, Mobil Oil Company On the moveTheAssociation of Graduate Careers Advisory Services has made two new appointmentsto its senior management team. John Gough, head of careers and student welfareat De Montfort University has joined the organisation as president for atwo-year term. He succeeds Lesley Knaggs and has been in AGCAS since 1992.Margaret Dane joins from Heriot-Watt University and becomes the new chiefexecutive.EstherMcLeod is the new HR manager at car manufacturer Kia Motors. The company hasemerged from the MCL group and is now operating independently. McLeod’s mainresponsibilities are around HR strategy, training and development, policymaking and recruitment. She will have an HR assistant and an HR co-ordinator tohelp with the administrative side of the job.StephenSmith has been promoted from development manager to HR director for AlliedGlass Containers, the glass-packing division of Associated British Foods. Hejoined the firm in 1993 as personnel manager and, since then, has been integralto the company’s HR and training strategies. Prior to joining Allied GlassContainers, Smith worked in the UK and overseas for organisations includingBritish Tissues and the SmithKline Corporation. Comments are closed. PeopleOn 29 Oct 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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A reappraisal of the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars

first_imgStable, hydrogen-burning, M dwarf stars make up about 75% of all stars in the Galaxy. They are extremely long-lived, and because they are much smaller in mass than the Sun (between 0.5 and 0.08 M-sun), their temperature and stellar luminosity are low and peaked in the red. We have re-examined what is known at present about the potential for a terrestrial planet forming within, or migrating into, the classic liquid-surface-water habitable zone close to an M dwarf star. Observations of protoplanetary disks suggest that planet-building materials are common around M dwarfs, but N-body simulations differ in their estimations of the likelihood of potentially habitable, wet planets that reside within their habitable zones, which are only about one-fifth to 1/50(th) of the width of that for a G star. Particularly in light of the claimed detection of the planets with masses as small as 5.5 and 7.5 M-Earth orbiting M stars, there seems no reason to exclude the possibility of terrestrial planets. Tidally locked synchronous rotation within the narrow habitable zone does not necessarily lead to atmospheric collapse, and active stellar flaring may not be as much of an evolutionarily disadvantageous factor as has previously been supposed. We conclude that M dwarf stars may indeed be viable hosts for planets on which the origin and evolution of life can occur. A number of planetary processes such as cessation of geother mal activity or thermal and nonthermal atmospheric loss processes may limit the duration of planetary habitability to periods far shorter than the extreme lifetime of the M dwarf star. Nevertheless, it makes sense to include M dwarf stars in programs that seek to find habitable worlds and evidence of life. This paper presents the summary conclusions of an interdisciplinary workshop (http://mstars.seti.org) sponsored by the NASA Astrobiology Institute and convened at the SETI Institute.last_img read more

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Cuda Oil and Gas announces closing of sale of its Quebec assets

first_imgCuda has disposed of all of its petroleum and natural gas rights in Quebec (the “Assets”) which includes all land permits, licenses and production rights and interests in the Province as well as all tangible assets including drilling and related equipment associated with the Assets Image: Cuda Oil and Gas announces closing of sale of its Quebec assets. Photo: courtesy of drpepperscott230 from Pixabay. Cuda Oil and Gas Inc. (“Cuda” or the “Company”) (TSXV: CUDA) is pleased to announce that it has closed Asset Purchase Agreements  (the  “APAs”) to sell all of its oil and gas assets and related liabilities located in the Province of Quebec (“Quebec”) at a total transaction value of CAD $10.59 million, including cash consideration at closing of CAD $4.29 million, to arm’s-length purchasers (the “Transaction”).Highlights:Cuda has disposed of all of its petroleum and natural gas rights in Quebec (the “Assets”) which includes all land permits, licenses and production rights and interests in the Province as well as all tangible assets including drilling and related equipment associated with the Assets;The purchasers assumed all environmental liabilities, including abandonment and reclamation obligations, associated with the Assets in Quebec, estimated by the parties at CAD $3.2 million;The purchasers paid CAD $4.29 million to Cuda in cash consideration; andCuda has been released and discharged from a pending CAD $3.1 million claim associated with the exercise of dissent rights in connection with the plan of arrangement of the Company completed August 15, 2018.KES 7 Capital Inc. (“KES 7”) acted as a financial advisor to the Company.  Pursuant to TSXV requirements, KES 7 has confirmed that it is an arm’s-length party to Cuda and the purchasers.Glenn Dawson, President and Chief Executive Officer of Cuda stated: “This is a significant transaction for Cuda shareholders in its magnitude and strategic creation of a pure play company in the Powder River Basin which has been described as the ‘Permian of the Rockies’.“Moving forward, Cuda will focus on development of the Company’s high netback conventional light oil assets and Secondary Recovery Miscible Gas Flood in Converse County, Wyoming. Cuda’s contiguous Powder River Basin lands contain multiple defined opportunities to access and develop low risk proven conventional reservoirs. We are excited about the opportunity in Wyoming and we look forward to updating investors on our progress shortly.”In addition, Cuda announces that it has retained Independent Trading Group (“ITG”) to provide market making services in accordance with TSX Venture Exchange policies.ITG will trade the securities of the Company on the TSX-V for the purposes of maintaining an orderly market. In consideration of the services provided by ITG, the Company will pay ITG a monthly cash fee of $5,000 for a minimum term of three months, and renewable thereafter. Cuda and ITG are unrelated and unaffiliated entities. ITG will not receive shares or options as compensation. The capital used for market making will be provided by ITG. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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