10 months agoDONE DEAL: Northampton sign Brighton fullback George Cox

first_imgDONE DEAL: Northampton sign Brighton fullback George Coxby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNorthampton Town have signed Brighton’s George Cox on loan for the rest of the season after the left-back’s recovery from heart surgery.The 20-year-old – who is yet to play for Brighton’s first team – had an operation last summer after screening found he had an irregular heartbeat.Cox has since returned to playing and training with their under-23 side.”He has a lot of talent and ability and he needs to be out playing senior football,” said Town boss Keith Curle. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More »

20 days agoLeicester defender Evans: Incredible Ricardo our best player every week

first_imgLeicester defender Evans: Incredible Ricardo our best player every weekby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City defender Jonny Evans has hailed the progress of teammate Ricardo Pereira.They have conceded just five goals in seven Premier League games, the fewest along with Liverpool. And Evans told the Mirror: “We’ve got a good young side. “There’s obviously a bit of inexperience there, but we’ve got some really good young players coming through, skillful, athletic and quick.“Our right-back, Ricardo, is probably our best player every single week, he’s incredible. It’s a privilege to play alongside him. Getting Tielemans on a permanent deal was a massive statement for the club. He came in last season and lit the place up.“When he came back after his loan spell and signed for us, it gave everyone a massive boost. He had big teams in for him, but he wanted to come back to Leicester.“It showed he could see the huge potential we’ve got in our squad. We’ve got a great bunch of lads, a great dressing-room and there’s no real egos in there, which is fantastic.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More »

16 days agoMcLean tips Chelsea youngster Gilmour tipped for massive career

first_imgMcLean tips Chelsea youngster Gilmour tipped for massive careerby Ansser Sadiq16 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveNorwich City midfielder Kenny McLean believes that his fellow countryman Barry Gilmour can go to the very top.The Chelsea youth team player is seen as one of the most promising talents in his age group.While he has not made his Scotland debut, he has featured for the Chelsea first team this season.And McLean believes that Gilmour has the talent to become a world class player.McLean told the Daily Record: “I’ve no doubt he’s going to have a massive international career and a massive future in the game but it’s up to the manager.”He’s played a couple of games at Chelsea now and that speaks for itself. His potential doesn’t even need spoken about, he’s that good.”He’s a level-headed boy. He just wants to do better and learn and when you get that in a young player, with any experience he can get it’s only going to get even better.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More »

Brokers New Times Shipbuilding Wins Bulker Pair Order

first_imgzoom Chinese New Times Shipbuilding has been tied to an order for up to four bulkers, according to the latest report from Intermodal Research and Valuations.The deal is said to be in a  letter of intent (LoI) stage. The order reportedly includes two firm 280,000 DWT ships and options for two more newbuildings.The duo, if confirmed, is scheduled for delivery in 2020. As disclosed, the buyer would be paying USD 44.5 million per ship.Based on the report, the buyer is Norwegian Frontline. However, Norwegian daily Finansavisen identified Tor Olav Troim, a former right hand of John Fredriksen, as the buyer of the new ships from the shipyard via a new company 2020 Bulkers.Frontline is yet to provide World Maritime News with a comment on the report.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Read More »

Alberta Saskatchewan Ontario criticize passage of federal environment bills

first_imgEDMONTON — Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says he will fight the passage of two federal environment bills on multiple fronts — starting in court.Kenney says he is filing constitutional challenges to Bill C-48 and Bill C-69 because he believes they unfairly target his oil and gas province.READ MORE: B.C. tanker ban, environment assessment bills scale final hurdle in SenateKenney says Bill C-48, which bans tanker traffic on the northern British Columbia coast, is particularly punitive because there’s no such ban on tanker traffic elsewhere in Canada.And he says Bill C-69, which rewrites rules to assess proposed energy projects, is so onerous that they won’t get built.Kenney also says he will revisit how much Alberta pays in equalization.READ MORE: A discussion on pipelines, the environment and more with the federal Natural Resources MinisterThe provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario have also weighed in with criticism on the bills.Ontario Energy Minister Greg Rickford says Bill C-69 is a twin disaster by reducing Canada’s energy competitiveness while failing to better protect the environment.Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe says the bills will hurt the economy and job creation.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Read More »

Mohawk link in major Alberta smokes bust

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe RCMP is trumpeting a major bust of contraband cigarettes in Alberta.The illegal smokes are valued at millions of dollars and were being stored on an Alberta First Nation.Questions are now swirling about how and why two band officials brought the cigarettes into the community.APTN National News reporter Noemi LoPinto has this story.last_img

Read More »

Energy regulator orders Hydro One to cut administrative budget by 30 million

first_imgTORONTO – Ontario’s electricity customers shouldn’t foot the bill for “unreasonably high” compensation for Hydro One’s senior staff, the province’s energy regulator said as it ordered the company to cut its administrative budget by $30 million over two years.In a recent ruling, the Ontario Energy Board rejected a Hydro One request to increase its administrative costs and spend more on capital projects. The OEB decision comes as part of a review of a 2016 rate hike request from Hydro One which, if approved, would see rates jump by 0.5 per cent in 2017 and 4.8 per cent in 2018. The regulator will set the rates later this fall.Hydro One said in a statement that it will review the OEB orders and “determine appropriate next steps”.Natalie Poole-Moffatt, the company’s vice-president of corporate affairs, defended the utility’s management team.“Hydro One recruited a leadership team with the necessary experience to deliver on the promises we made to our customers: improve customer service and increase productivity while maintaining reliability,” she said in a statement.In 2015, the government announced it would sell 60 per cent of Hydro One to raise billions it would put towards infrastructure projects.In the decision, the OEB said hydro customers gain little from the jump in executive salaries that were largely generated by the IPO. The total corporate management costs for Hydro One in 2014 of about $5.5 million are set to increase to $22.1 million in 2018, the regulator said.“The OEB shares the concerns of … (those) who question whether Hydro One has adequately demonstrated that the significant increases in compensation costs associated with the parent company’s transformation will produce outcomes that utility customers value,” the OEB decision said.It also expressed concern that Hydro One has stopped making progress toward bringing executive compensation levels down to the market median and those efforts have “now reversed.” The regulator also said the company’s total compensation amounts are likely understated because not all items of Hydro One compensation were included in its rate hike request.“After considering all of the evidence related to the amounts for compensation that Hydro One seeks to recover from transmission services ratepayers, the OEB finds that compensation amounts in the total (administrative budget) for 2017 and 2018 of $412.7 million and $409.3 million are unreasonably high by an amount of approximately $15 million in each year,” the decision said.The OEB also rejected a proposal to give all of the tax savings generated by the 2015 IPO of the partially privatized company to shareholders. The regulator instead mandated shareholders receive 71 per cent of the savings while ratepayers receive the remaining 29 per cent.That would drop Hydro One’s shareholders portion of tax savings from $81.9 million to $58.1 in 2017 and from $89.6 million to $63.6 million in 2018.The OEB also ordered Hydro One to reduce its budget for capital expenditures by $126.1 million in 2017 and $122.2 million in 2018.A spokesman for Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault said Tuesday that the government’s plan to cut hydro bills by 25 per cent will not be impacted by any rate application approved by the OEB. Colin Nekolaichuk said the OEB rate application process has resulted in $278 million in reduced administrative and capital costs.“This is yet another example of the OEB’s strong record of denying hydro companies all that they ask for, and reviewing rate applications with the consumer in mind first,” he said in a statement.But NDP energy critic Peter Tabuns said the OEB didn’t go far enough to limit executive compensation or give ratepayers a bigger piece of future tax savings.“Legally, they could have assigned 100 per cent of (the tax savings) to customers,” Tabuns said. “There are billions of dollars that are now going to shareholders that could have kept bills down.”Progressive Conservative energy critic Todd Smith said the OEB decision shows that Hydro One’s executive compensation is out of line with other jurisdictions. Smith noted that the OEB report also provides an increasingly rare look into the financial status of Hydro One, which was removed from the purview of several legislative watchdogs after the IPO.“It takes an OEB report to actually see now what executive compensation has grown to at Hydro One,” he said. “No longer are the executives and the total cost to ratepayers known because only the top five executives are required … to declare what their compensation is.”last_img read more

Read More »

Agriculture Dept launches 2nd round of payments to farmers

first_imgWASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has authorized the Agriculture Department to launch the second and final round of $11 billion in trade mitigation payments to farmers hard hit by tariffs.In a tweet on Monday, Trump said he is fulfilling a promise to protect farmers against “unjustified trade retaliation by foreign nations.”The Trump administration in July announced it would provide up to $12 billion to offset losses from Trump’s trade disputes with China and other countries.The first round of checks went out in September.In total, producers of almonds, corn, cotton, dairy, hogs, sorghum, soybeans, fresh sweet cherries and wheat will receive roughly $9.5 billion. Soybean farmers will get the largest share.Roughly $1.2 billion is earmarked for a food purchase and distribution program and $200 million to promote trade.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Read More »

Province proposes to enact wolf cull in order to restore caribou population

first_img“The objective of this wolf reduction program is to reverse caribou population decline in the Tweedsmuir-Entiako, Hart Ranges, and Itcha-Ilgachuz herds. To reverse caribou population declines, high rates of wolf removal (>80%) must be achieved.”Robert Serrouya, director of the Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute’s Caribou Monitoring Unit says several herds in B.C. have already turned around because of this multi-pronged approach.It is reported that a 30-day consultation with Indigenous communities and “targeted stakeholders” is underway in regards to the proposed wolf cull. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Province of British Columbia is proposing to enact a predator cull to reduce the wolf population in central parts of the Province.As reported by the Vancouver Sun, the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development says the cull would kill more than 80 percent of the wolf population in parts of central B.C. where herds are threatened.Darcy Peel, director of the B.C. Caribou Recovery Program, says the purpose of the wolf reduction program is to help the struggling caribou population, adding that an 80 percent reduction would be needed to ensure the return of caribou populations.last_img read more

Read More »

Emails reveal notsofine print

On Monday, Ohio State revealed more email correspondence between Jim Tressel and Columbus lawyer Christopher Cicero, the man who alerted the football coach of possible violations by players, which Tressel has since acknowledged he failed to disclose to OSU and NCAA officials. The previously undisclosed emails contain advice from Cicero to players involved with Eddie Rife, the owner of Fine Line Ink tattoo parlor. “My suggestion is to tell (names redacted) (and any other current player) who has had contact with him (Rife), that if they are approached in person, by phone, by “target” letter, by any person in law enforcement, tell them that BEFORE they talk to anybody, or respond to anybody that they MUST contact you first… especially if some stupid media would get ‘wind’ of this… ok. Chris,” Cicero said to Tressel in an email on April 16, 2010. Cicero also suggested that Tressel advise his players to speak to the coach if anyone questions them about the matter involving Rife, who was under a federal investigation for drug trafficking charges. Tressel responded to Cicero three days later, asking if he had any more information on names associated with the selling of the 2008 Big Ten Championship rings. Tressel also hinted that he had a “plan” regarding the 2009 Big Ten Championship rings that had yet to arrive. “Is there a way I could get all the ring names…I have a little plan once this year’s rings arrive….jt,” Tressel wrote. Cicero responded a day later. He said an agent of the district attorney involved with the Rife case had the rings sold to Rife. “Thanks!!” Tressel responded. More than a month had passed without another email from Cicero. On June 1, Tressel emailed Cicero asking if he had any more names from the rings that had been sold. Tressel told Cicero the 2009 Big Ten Championship rings were arriving that week. “Any names from our last discussion ?? I would like to hold some collateral if you know what I mean….. jt,” Tressel said in the email. Cicero responded later that day, indicating that the two names he provided before were “still good.” Cicero informed Tressel that communication between himself and the district attorney had ceased and that no more names had surfaced. OSU said the emails released Monday, which had been detailed in a Columbus Dispatch article, were “inadvertently omitted” from the initial email release on March 8. OSU also acknowledged receiving a formal list of allegations from the NCAA on Monday. The NCAA sent a letter addressed to President E. Gordon Gee explaining the current state of the investigation. OSU is expected to respond to the NCAA’s request by July 5 and a meeting is then set for Aug. 12. In an interview with ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” on March 13, Cicero confirmed he mentioned quarterback Terrelle Pryor and wide receiver DeVier Posey while informing Tressel of his players’ involvement with Rife. In an email to The Lantern, Cicero said: “I gave an ESPN interview in March 2011, with Chris Spielman where I gave a taped interview answering every question posed to me. It is the only interview I am giving on this matter.” Five Buckeyes, including Pryor, Posey, offensive lineman Mike Adams, running back Dan Herron and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas are suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits. Cicero played football at OSU under coach Earle Bruce, and graduated in the spring of 1984. He lettered his senior year. In an email Tressel sent to Ted Sarniak, a 67-year-old business man from Jeannette, Pa., who befriended Pryor many years ago, Tressel seemed to vouch for the Columbus lawyer. Sarniak accompanied Pryor on his recruiting trips to OSU and other universities as a mentor figure for the young athlete. Tressel explained to Sarniak the relationship between Cicero and the university. “This guy, Chris Cicero, is a criminal lawyer in town,” Tressel said in the email. “He played here when I was an assistant coach in the early 1980’s. He has always looked out for us.” read more

Read More »