Dodgers’ Dave Roberts wants hot-hitting Yasmani Grandal in lineup from both sides

first_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error DENVER — Last season at about this point, Yasmani Grandal was losing playing time. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts turned more frequently to Austin Barnes at catcher down the stretch and in the playoffs.Not this year.Grandal has been the Dodgers’ hottest hitter since the start of July. In 29 games before Thursday, Grandal was batting .330 with a 1.170 OPS. Barnes, on the other hand, has been unable to shake a season-long slump and recapture the level of performance that made him a viable alternative when Grandal’s production dropped off late last season.So it was Grandal in the lineup Thursday against Rockies left-hander Tyler Anderson. The switch-hitting Grandal has always been a much more dangerous hitter batting left-handed than right-handed and that has not changed this season – he hit .267 with a .910 OPS left-handed and .214 with a .676 OPS against lefties before Thursday. How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire “I think, one, in the batter’s box against a left-hander he’s put forth better at-bat quality, for me,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “Also if you look at the next 10 days, we’re going to face a lot of left-handed pitching. He’s our starting catcher so we’ve got to get him in there.”Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.Roberts credited Grandal for putting in the work on his right-handed swing. But the manager didn’t dismiss the idea that Grandal’s hot streak has given him more confidence from both sides of the plate.“I think there’s a confidence component,” Roberts said. “But there’s also a mechanical component as well that you have to value. He’s worked really hard on his right-handed swing. Just his ability to stay inside the ball. When he gets rotational and gets around the baseball right-handed, it gets tough to square it up and to stay on the baseball.“But he’s as good as anybody in the National League right now and that certainly bleeds over into the right side.”URIAS UPDATEAfter two appearances in the Arizona Summer League, left-hander Julio Urias will take a significant step forward in his recovery from major shoulder surgery when he moves up to Class-A Rancho Cucamonga on Friday. Urias is scheduled to pitch two innings for the Quakes in his first game there. Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies The ASL games were Urias’ first game action since he had the anterior capsule in his left shoulder repaired 13-1/2 months ago. The Dodgers are hopeful Urias will be ready to pitch for them in September in a multi-inning relief role.“The movement and delivery is progressing nicely,” said Dodgers director of player development Brandon Gomes, who watched Urias’ Arizona outings. “He feels really good. He’s recovering well. We’re on a good path right now.”Earlier this week, Roberts said the reports on Urias were that he had “touched 93” mph during his games in Arizona. But Gomes said it’s far too early to base any evaluation on velocity.“I just don’t think that’s relevant right now,” he said. “For a guy who has pitched in the big leagues who’s throwing in Arizona – it’s not going to be the same.”Gomes said there is no specific timetable to move Urias up to Double-A and Triple-A or even a hard schedule on how often he will pitch.“We’re really just going on how he feels day to day,” Gomes said. “He’s too good and too young to do anything that would set him back.”Sunday is Urias’ 22nd birthday.HUDSON STATUSWhen the Dodgers placed reliever Daniel Hudson on the 10-day DL earlier this week with forearm tightness it raised some red flags. Forearm discomfort is often a precursor of an elbow injury – and Hudson has already had Tommy John surgery twice.“It felt different than that so I wasn’t too worried,” Hudson said, no doubt having acquired a great deal of expertise on arm injuries during his career.Hudson played catch in the outfield Thursday afternoon and said he will do the same again Friday with plans to throw off a mound possibly as soon as Saturday.“I just wasn’t bouncing back, didn’t feel quite right,” Hudson said of the forearm issue. “We’re basically taking it one day at a time but it feels better already.”ALSOThe Dodgers activated right-hander Ross Stripling from the DL before Thursday’s game and returned reliever Pat Venditte to Triple-A Oklahoma City.UP NEXTDodgers (RHP Kenta Maeda, 7-7, 3.73 ERA) at Rockies (RHP Jon Gray, 9-7, 4.73 ERA), Friday, 5:40 p.m., SportsNet LA (where available)Related Articles Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start last_img read more

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Garage Sales for this weekend…

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (10) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Doris · 212 weeks ago Church garage sale at 11th and Jefferson Wednesday thru Friday. July 20-21-22 from 8-1. Lots of stuff! Make offer on everything. Lots of folding chairs, folding tables, some furniture. 3 old church pews, lots of material and sewing materials. Report Reply 0 replies · active 212 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Doris · 212 weeks ago Church sale on July 20-21-22. Wednesday thru Friday from 8am-1pm. Lots of material, sewing stuff, church pews, folding chairs and tables. Little bit of everything. Make a offer on everything. Report Reply 0 replies · active 212 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Stacey Fair · 212 weeks ago Garage Sale on Saturday July 23rd 8:00-2:00 pm 1421 N Day Street. Couch and matching chair, chest of drawers, Longaberger baskets, , children’s books, bookshelf, lots of home décor, some seasonal decorations, Christmas tree 7 1/2 foot skinny, boys and girls teen clothes, women’s clothing, boys shoes, bedding full/queen, 3 shelf stand for bathroom, 4 shelf stand for kitchen, and lots of miscellaneous stuff. Come check us out!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 212 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Dietra Sober · 212 weeks ago Huge sale Friday 8-6 and Saturday 8-? 611 N Douglas, near 9th st. football field. Get all your back to school shopping done here! Girls and boys teen clothing, athletic wear, baseball gear, Crusader clothing, couch, book and pantry shelves, night stand, vintage sewing machine, picture frames, elliptical, gifts and so much more!! You don’t want to miss this! Report Reply 0 replies · active 212 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Kim Hefley · 212 weeks ago Huge Garage Sale Saturday, July 23rd 8:00 am – 2:00 pm @ 1101 Edgewood Dr. Just 3 houses west of Eisenhower Elementary. Roll Top Desk, Suitcases, Bicycles, Softball Equipment, 4-H Livestock Show supplies, Camping gear, cots, Men’s clothing, Hunting clothing,lots of Teen/college girl clothing, Craft supplies, material, Pogo Sticks, Skateboard, Mini trampoline, VHS tapes & holder, Swim gear, Boogie board, beach Umbrella & spiral holder, and tons more. Downsizing, no more kids at home….. Report Reply 0 replies · active 212 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Ronalda Ferguson · 212 weeks ago Moving sale 1702 North C, Wellington Friday, July 22nd 3pm to 7pm. Saturday, July 23rd 7am to 11am. Everything $1.00 and everything must go! Report Reply 0 replies · active 212 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Jennifer · 211 weeks ago Garage Sale – July 23, 2016 at 1704 N B Street from 8am-11am. Home décor, books, clothes, lots of miscellaneous goodies!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 211 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Sharon Hays · 211 weeks ago 1107 E. 7th, Wellington Saturday morning July 23 Portable dishwasher, garbage disposer, microwave stand Report Reply 0 replies · active 211 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Sharon Hays · 211 weeks ago 1107 E. 7th, Wellington, July 23 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Portable dishwasher, garbage disposer, microwave cart Report Reply 0 replies · active 211 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Sharon Hays · 211 weeks ago 1107 E. 7th – July 23 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. portable dishwasher, garbage disposer, microwave stand Report Reply 0 replies · active 211 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The following are the garage sales that we have for the weekend of July 22-24, 2016. If you still need a garage sale advertised just use the comment section below. Good luck with bargain hunting! Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

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Governor to wield too much power

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Placing this much power in the hands of just one person is a clear invitation for abuse. The governor could use the budget to reward friends, punish enemies or push his personal agenda, and the Legislature would be powerless to stop him. Even if you agree with this governor, what about future governors? Do we really want to give one person almost dictatorial control over state spending, with no legislative oversight or accountability? Dictatorships may be more efficient, but they don’t make for better budget-making, not in a democracy where spending priorities need to be carefully balanced and fully debated. California governors already have sufficient power to deliver a balanced budget for taxpayers, a lesson I learned as Gov. Pete Wilson’s finance director. Sure, negotiations with the Legislature can be tough. But under the current system, the governor is first at bat and has the last hit. He submits a spending plan, negotiates the details and has the power to blue-pencil wasteful spending before the budget takes effect. The system works. The governor has plenty of power to do what’s needed. The California State PTA opposes Proposition 76 because of its crippling impact on public schools. The initiative reduces the minimum public school funding requirements approved by voters when they passed Proposition 98. The immediate effect would be to slash ongoing public school funding by about $4 billion – more than $600 per student. At a time when more money is needed for books, new teachers, after-school programs and classroom supplies, Proposition 76 cuts it. A staff analysis by the California State Association of Counties warns that Proposition 76 is poorly written and “contains serious drafting errors that will result in unintended consequences that will have a severe fiscal impact on counties.” At risk could be some $2.6 billion in voter-approved public-safety funding used by cities and counties to pay for police and fire protection, in addition to more than $450 million in funding for the juvenile probation system, emergency services and other crime-prevention programs. Also at risk is local government funding for social services, transportation and health care, including disease prevention, senior programs and child immunization. As for the governor’s claim that Proposition 76 will prevent future tax increases, even Republicans disagree. The measure “actually encourages tax increases,” says the president of the California Republican Assembly, the state’s largest GOP grass-roots organization. The Legislative Analyst agrees, saying “the state could raise taxes for either general or specific purposes” under Proposition 76. Calling Proposition 76 budget “reform” doesn’t make it so. In fact, it makes an even bigger mess. Craig Brown served as California’s director of finance under former Gov. Pete Wilson.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Despite Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s best efforts to sell Proposition 76 as the cure for what ails our state’s budget process, it isn’t. Instead, it’s a direct assault on our democratic system of checks and balances that delivers a crushing blow to our public schools, with the potential to devastate state funding for local health care, transportation and public safety. Proposition 76 makes major changes in California’s constitution, dramatically expanding the governor’s power over the state budget and giving him the authority to cut spending for schools, public safety, health care, transportation and other programs – of the governor’s choosing – without voter approval or legislative oversight. He need only declare a “fiscal emergency” to exercise this sweeping new executive power, the threshold for which is “not particularly high,” according to an independent review by the Legislative Analyst’s Office. A report by the independent California Budget Project says Proposition 76 “would significantly broaden the governor’s power and eliminate the Legislature’s ability to determine which laws should remain in force.” “The Legislature would be locked out of deliberations over future budget cuts,” says the report, warning that Proposition 76 would provide the governor with “the ability to override state laws” and grant him “broad powers to cut even in years when there is a budget surplus.” last_img read more

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SA infrastructure build on track: Zuma

first_img4 July 2013 South Africa is a thriving building site, with about 1 132 active construction sites creating employment for about 178 000 people on projects monitored by the Presidential Infrastructure Co-ordinating Commission (PICC). The commission held a meeting in Pretoria on Wednesday, where progress on these projects – with a value of R750-billion – and other infrastructure development matters were thrashed out. Speaking to reporters after the meeting, President Jacob Zuma said he was happy with the development progress of the country. “The meeting took longer because of the volume of the matters on the agenda, such as the progress report on infrastructure build. We had lots of discussions and we are certain that we are making progress,” he said. The PICC brings together representatives of the three spheres of government, Cabinet ministers, premiers, metro mayors and the South African Local Government Association representatives to harmonise developments in the National Infrastructure Plan. The meeting examined the successes and challenges in the roll-out of the 18 Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs), which currently make up the country’s multi- billion rand National Infrastructure Plan.‘National, collective point of view’ The plan looks to transform the economic landscape, while simultaneously creating a significant number of new jobs and straightening service delivery. The SIPs cover various projects of economic and social infrastructure projects such as schools, hospitals and new power stations. “The important thing about the [PICC] is that it puts together all tiers of government to discuss issues from a national, collective point of view,” said Zuma. Economic Development Minister Ebrahim Patel – chair of the PICC – said the commission currently tracks almost half of the state’s capital spending and the whole of government infrastructure spending. Patel said during the term of the current administration, which ends next year, the country was on course to reach spending of R1-trillion on infrastructure projects. He also said the state was spending about twice as much on infrastructure now than it did five years ago and attributed the increase in infrastructure expenditure to projects such as the 2010 Fifa World Cup and associated projects. New building technologies and innovative building, which could reduce construction costs, are being evaluated by the government, he said The increase in infrastructure spending was also due to construction cartels which have pushed up the cost of building, Patel said. The PICC meeting discussed the investigation showing evidence of pervasive price fixing, collusion and corruption in the private construction industry, following the Competition Commission reaching a settlement with 15 construction firms, who agreed to pay fines to the tune of R1.46-billion for collusive tendering on 24 June. Rural Development and Land Reform Minister Gugile Nkwinti said the infrastructure build gave government a stronger grip on developing the economy. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

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South African literature

first_imgAn overview of the main currents in South African literature, from Olive Schreiner’s depiction of life on isolated Karoo farms to more recent work that tackles the aftermath of apartheid and pushes into the post-apartheid future.South Africa has a rich and diverse literary history. (Image: Okay Africa)Brand South Africa reporterSouth Africa has a rich and diverse literary history, with realism, until relatively recently, dominating works of fiction.Fiction has been written in all of South Africa’s 11 official languages – with a large body of work in Afrikaans and English. This overview focuses primarily on English fiction, though it also touches on major poetic developments.Sections in this article:The colonial adventureTruly South African voices Emergence of black writing Between the wars The 1940sThe Drum decade: urban black life Gordimer: liberalism to radicalismFigures of the 1960s The Soweto poetsThe emergency years After apartheidThe colonial adventure The first fictional works to emerge from South Africa were produced by colonial writers whose attitude to indigenous South Africans was, at best, ambivalent, if not outright hostile. This is especially true of the writers of adventure-type stories, in which colonial heroes are romanticised and the role of black South Africans was reduced to that of enemy or servant.One such writer, Rider Haggard, wrote many mythical and adventure stories, beginning in the early 1880s. His most famous book is King Solomon’s Mines (1886), a bestseller in its day (and filmed several times up to the 1980s). Like subsequent novels such as Allan Quartermain and She (both 1887), its central character is the hunter Allan Quartermain, Haggard’s ideal of the colonial gentleman.Although Haggard wrote many other adventures and fantasies, it is his highly coloured African works that are still read today.Back to topTruly South African voices Olive Schreiner’s novel, The Story of an African Farm (1883) is generally considered to be the founding text of South African literature. Schreiner was born on a mission station and worked as a governess on isolated Karoo farms, an experience that informed the novel.The novel draws on the post-romantic sensibility of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, and is still a key text in the formation of a truly South African voice. However, it has been criticised for its silence with regard to the black African presence in South Africa. Schreiner’s other work includes a critique of Cecil John Rhodes’s brutal form of colonialism, Trooper Peter Halkett of Mashonaland (1897), and the polemical Women and Labour (1911).Douglas Blackburn, a maverick British journalist who came to South Africa when the Transvaal was still a Boer republic, had something in common with Schreiner. In several newspapers, he denounced British colonial attitudes as well as satirising Boer corruption. He wrote two novels set in this world, Prinsloo of Prinsloosdorp (1899) and A Burgher Quixote (1903), capturing with a great deal of sly humour the personality and situation of the Boer at the time. His later novel Leaven (1908) is a moving denunciation of “blackbirding” (the recruitment of people through trickery and kidnappings to work on farms) and other iniquitous labour practices, and Love Muti (1915) attacks British colonial attitudes.Emergence of black writing Literature by black South Africans emerged in the 20 th century. The first generation of mission-educated African writers sought to restore dignity to Africans by invoking and reconstructing a heroic African past.The first novel by a black South African was Mhudi (completed in 1920 but only published in 1930), by Solomon (Sol) Thekiso Plaatje. This epic story follows the trajectory of the Tswana people during and after their military encounter with the Zulus under Shaka, the Zulu conqueror of the 19th century, and encompasses their earliest encounters with the white people moving into the interior.Viewed as the founding father of black literature in South Africa, Plaatje was also the first secretary general of the then South African Native National Congress (now the African National Congress) at its foundation in 1912. His Native Life in South Africa (1916) was a seminal text in the study of land dispossession in South Africa. He also wrote a diary of the siege of Mafeking during the Boer War, and translated Shakespeare into seTswana language.While Plaatje’s Mhudi related the history of the Tswana people in South African literature, Thomas Mofolo’s Chaka reinvents the legendary Zulu king, Shaka. Mofolo portrays him as a heroic but tragic figure, a monarch to rival Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Mofolo, however, also invests Shaka with a complex personality, in which good and evil are at war – in contrast to white colonial historians who made him a simplistic monster of tribal savagery. Completed in 1910, the novel was published in 1925 and the first English translation came out in 1930.Between the wars Perhaps the dominant figure of South African literature in the period between the two world wars was Sarah Gertrude Millin, whose reputation has faded considerably since her death. This can be predicated on her politics: she was initially a devout supporter of Jan Smuts’ government, but later became something of an apologist for apartheid.Her views on the “tragedy” of racial miscegenation were put forward in God’s Stepchildren (1924). Seen in terms of racial hierarchies, with whites at the top and blacks at the bottom, Millin’s views represented those held widely at the time.Her later novels continued to deal with the predicament of coloured (mixed-race) people in South Africa, or attempted to describe the world of indigenous peoples.Back to topThe 1940s The 1940s saw the beginnings of a flowering of literature by black South Africans such as HIE Dhlomo whose work preached a “return to the source” – the wisdom of finding traditional ways of dealing with modern problems. His work includes several plays and the long poem The Valley of a Thousand Hills (1941). Poets such as BW Vilakazi, who wrote in Zulu, gave new literary life to their indigenous languages.Peter Abrahams, a writer of mixed race descent, published his first novel Mine Boy in 1946, the same year a large miners’ strike was violently suppressed by Smuts’ government. Mine Boy depicts life in black urban areas of the time, and dramatises the problems of rural people in a depressed urban environment – a theme that was referred to as the “Jim comes to Jo’burg” phenomenon in South African literature.Later works by Abrahams (who left South Africa and settled in Britain before finally moving to Jamaica) include The Path of Thunder (1948), which deals with interracial love; Return to Goli (1953), about his journey back to report on life in Johannesburg; and his autobiography Tell Freedom (1954).Another South African writer who emerged in the 1940s, Herman Charles Bosman, is best known for his tales, a portrait of Afrikaner storytelling skills and social attitudes. The first collection of stories was published in Mafeking Road in 1947. Among the most famous are Unto Dust and In the Withaak’s Shade. Bosman, who was once jailed for the mysterious murder of his half-brother, also wrote poetry, novels, and much journalism, often satirical. One of his best works, Cold Stone Jug (1949), is a semi-fictionalised account of his time in jail. All his books have been reissued in new 2001 editions to coincide with the 50th anniversary of his death.Bosman had satirised social attitudes in South Africa, but it was the work of a former white schoolteacher, Alan Paton, that brought the world’s attention to the situation of black people in South Africa. Cry, The Beloved Country (1948) is possibly the most famous novel to have come out of South Africa. When it was first published, it was an international bestseller, launching Paton, to worldwide fame. The novel put South Africa on the map of international politics by making visible to Western audiences the effects of racial prejudice and the oppression of black people. The novel was turned into a movie in 1995.It is the story of a black priest who travels to Johannesburg in search of his son, who had fallen victim to the corrupting influence of the city. The novel explores themes of corruption and forgiveness, putting forward a liberal-humanist view of South Africa’s racial politics – as well as Paton’s deeply felt Christianity. The novel has a lovely poetic language, with extensive use of Biblical cadences, though Paton has also been criticised for a possibly condescending portrayal of black people.Back to topThe Drum decade: urban black life The 1950s also saw a new generation of black writers talking about the conditions of their lives in their own voices – voices with a distinctive stamp and style. The popular Drum magazine in the 1950s was their forum, and encouraged their emergence. It depicted a vibrant urban black culture for the first time – a world of jazz, shebeens (illegal drinking dens), and flamboyant gangsters (tsotsis).These Drum writers, whose style will be later described by renowned writer Es’kia Mphahlele as “racy, agitated, impressionistic, it quivered with a nervous energy, a caustic wit”, depicted urban deprivation, and also the resilience of people who survived “without visible means of subsistence”. They recorded satirical stories ridiculing the discriminatory and repressive policies of the state, while others provided harrowing details of the effect of apartheid legislation on people’s lives.Their work ranged from the investigative journalism of Henry Nxumalo to the witty social commentary of Todd Matshikiza; others such as Nat Nakasa, Can Themba and Mphahlele moved toward embodying their visions of black South African life in poetry or fiction.Later, Nakasa edited a literary journal, The Classic, that published work such as Themba’s story “The Suit” (1963), now regarded as a classic of South African literature. Themba was banned by the apartheid state and died in 1968 in exile, but others such as Mphahlele pursued their literary careers.Lewis Nkosi became a noted literary critic in Europe and the United States. Other notable writers connected in some way to Drum include William Bloke Modisane, Arthur Maimane, Dyke Sentso, James Matthews, Peter Clarke, Richard Rive, Jordan Ngubane, Alex La Guma and Casey Motsisi. Modisane wrote the autobiography Blame Me on History (1963), Matthews has written much poetry and a novel, and Rive wrote Buckingham Palace, District Six (1986), about life in that coloured Cape Town area, and two novels about South African states of emergency, decades apart, Emergency (1964) and Emergency Continued (1989).The Drum Decade , edited by Michael Chapman, and A Good Looking Corpse , by Mike Nicol, anthologise and comment on key works of this era.Professor E’skia Mphahlele’s autobiographical Down Second Avenue (1959) is a landmark in the development of South African fiction. Set in a village and a township near Pretoria, the text records in evocative language the resilience of various female characters in Mphahlele’s life, women who defied poverty and urban squalor to bring him up. At the same time, they are presented with complexity and depth – his grandmother, for one, is a rather tyrannical figure.Mphahlele went on to write critiques The African Image (1962), short stories Man Must Live (1946), In Corner B (1967), as well as further novels, including The Wanderers (1971), in some ways an extension of the autobiographical form of Down Second Avenue . He also wrote poetry and autobiography. Taken as a whole, Mphahlele’s oeuvre represents one of the most important views of the life experience and developing views of a politically aware South African.In 2007, actor and theatre director James Ngcobo reworked Mphahlele’s poignant and emotional story The Suitcase into a highly successful play.Back to topGordimer: liberalism to radicalism At the same time as the Drum generation was creating the first urban black voice, one of South Africa’s most important white writers was beginning her long, distinguished career. Nadine Gordimer published her first short stories in the early 1950s and in 1991 she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Between those two dates, her many novels and short stories articulated key issues for white South Africans sympathetic to the plight of disenfranchised blacks, as well as providing for the outside world a devastating picture of what it was like to live under apartheid.In her first published novel The Lying Days (1953), Gordimer charts the growing political awareness of a young white woman, Helen, towards small-town life and South African racial divisionHer second novel, A World of Strangers (1958), shows the first fruitful but often frightening encounters between white and black people in the heady days of Sophiatown. By the time of The Late Bourgeois World (1966), Gordimer is dealing directly with the effects of the black liberation movement on white South Africans, showing the divided soul of the white liberal in a morally ambivalent situation. The Conservationist (1974) pits Afrikaner land hunger against the indigenous population in an often phantasmagoric narrative. Burger’s Daughter (1979) depicts the involvement of radical white activists in the liberation struggle. July’s People (1981), perhaps Gordimer’s most powerful novel, projects into the future the final collapse of white supremacy and what that might mean for white and black people on an intimate level. Her other works (and her short stories are regarded as among her finest work) deal with issues such as love across the colour line and, more recently, the emergence of South Africa into a democracy after the release of Nelson Mandela in 1990 – a society still dealing with a myriad contradictions.Back to topFigures of the 1960s In the early 1960s, the State of Emergency used by the apartheid state to crack down on dissidents and the banning of political organisations sent many black writers into exile. Among them was Alex la Guma, a Marxist and ANC leader who saw the purpose of his work as the exposure of the dreadful conditions of South Africa’s oppressed.His novella A Walk in the Night (1962) shows the life of crime to which slum inhabitants are driven, and And a Threefold Cord (1967) contrasts the existence of a black worker in a white home with her employers’ affluent life. The later novel, In the Fog of the Season’s End (1972), possibly his best, shows the developing consciousness of a man dedicated to the underground struggle for freedom. As a “listed person”, little of La Guma’s work was available in South Africa until 1990, when the liberation movements were unbanned.At the same time, in the 1960s, the Afrikaans literary scene had a rush of new blood, as literary writers such as Jan Rabie, Etienne Leroux, Breyten Breytenbach and Andre Brink emerged. Publishing first in Afrikaans, these writers were increasingly politicised by the situation in South Africa and their contrasting experiences overseas.Breytenbach, who began as one of the most linguistically radical new poets in Afrikaans, left South Africa for France in 1960, where he became a vocal critic of the apartheid state. Later, in the 1970s, he returned to South Africa and was arrested and jailed for work he was doing for the liberation movement. From this experience came his extraordinary prison memoir, True Confessions of an Albino Terrorist (1996). His prison poetry was published in English in Judas Eye (1988). Breytenbach’s return visits to South Africa are recorded, mixing reportage and imaginative commentary, in A Season in Paradise (1976) and Return to Paradise (1993). His essays have been published in The Memory of Birds in Times of Revolution (1996). Even under an ANC government as he was under a Nationalist one, Breytenbach remains caustic about politics and power.Andre Brink stayed in South Africa to see his novels become the first Afrikaans works banned by the government. Written in English as well as Afrikaans, his novels have become as important a part of South African English-language literature as they are in Afrikaans. Having published several novels in Afrikaans during the 1960s, it was his novel Looking on Darkness (1973) that was first banned.His immensely powerful novel A Dry White Season (1982), focused on the death in detention of a black activist, and caused great irritation to the apartheid state, while conscientising many white South Africans. It was also banned, then unbanned. Later novels by this prolific novelist include An Act of Terror (1991), dealing with an Afrikaner dissident turned “terrorist”, and On the Contrary (1993), a playful reworking of South Africa’s colonial history.During this period, Bessie Head emerged as a leading South African woman writer. Of mixed blood, and with a traumatic family history, Head left South Africa to avoid its racial policies and lived in Botswana, where she felt more at ease. Her novels show a marked sympathy with ordinary peasant women; her heroines are poor but strong-willed, women who have to face up to various forms of prejudice.Her first novel was When Rain Clouds Gather (1968), followed by Maru (1971), The Collector of Treasures (1977), and A Question of Power (1973). The Collector of Treasures is her most autobiographical work, dealing with the traumas of her own illegitimate mixed-race birth, her mother’s suicide and her own nervous breakdown.Another writer to make his name in the 1960s was Wilbur Smith, South Africa’s a worldwide best-selling author. In many ways he is the heir to the tradition of Rider Haggard – some would say politically as well.His earliest novels are probably his best: Where the Lion Feeds (1964) and The Sound of Thunder (1966) are set in the era of the foundation of gold-mining in South Africa. Others go as far afield as the state of Israel, Ethiopia during the Italian invasion, piracy in the age of sail, or, more recently, investigate the pharaonic times of Ancient Egypt. His latest novel, The Quest (2007), is New York Times’s best seller as well as best seller in several European countries.The 1960s also saw the emergence of a new generation of white South African poets, among them Douglas Livingstone, Sidney Clouts, Ruth Miller, Lionel Abrahams and Stephen Gray. Their work ranges from powerful apprehensions of natural life (Livingstone) to more interior, meditative considerations (Abrahams), and a sardonic socio-political sensibility (Gray).Gray has also written novels, plays and much criticism. Abrahams has written two semi-autobiographical novels, The Celibacy of Felix Greenspan (1977) and The White Life of Felix Greenspan (2002).Back to topThe Soweto poets The 1970s are widely regarded as a defining period for the development of political consciousness among black South Africans. With the rise of the Black Consciousness (BC) movement, of which the martyred Bantu Steve Biko was a leading figure, and the school children’s revolt of 1976, literature became a vehicle to promote the political ideals of anti-apartheid popular movements. The genres of drama and poetry were utilised for their immediacy of impact.The most notable writers from this period are Mongane (Wally) Serote, Sipho Sepamla, Oswald Joseph Mbuyiseni Mtshali, Christopher van Wyk, Mafika Gwala and Don Mattera. Couched in graphic language designed to arouse the emotions of listeners, their poems were often performed at political rallies.While Mtshali’s poems, first published in 1971 in The Sound of a Cowhide Drum , asked for generalised sympathy for the plight of poor black people, and Sepamla was at first considered a “contemplative” poet, the tone soon changed. By the time of The Soweto I Love (1977), Sepamla’s poetic persona is fully identified with the oppressed. Sepamla also wrote a novel of this turbulent time, A Ride on the Whirlwind (1981). Sepamla, apart from being a leading arts teacher, has written several other novels, and his Selected Poems were published in 1984.Serote’s early poems, in volumes such as Yakhal’inkomo (1972) and Tsetlo (1974), deal with the life and attitudes of a politically aware black person, looking at his society and its discontentment. In later volumes, Serote begins to develop an epic, incantatory voice, with the long poems of Behold Mama, Flowers (1978) and Come and Hope with Me (1994), winner of the Noma Award for Publishing in Africa.Serote (who became an ANC leader) is also the author of the novel To Every Birth Its Blood (1981), a remarkable account of political activity in the 1970s. Serote’s later novel, Gods of our Time (1999), reconstructs civil and military campaigns which led to the demise of apartheid.Other interesting fiction to deal with the Soweto revolt and subsequent political activity include Miriam Tlali’s Amandla (1980) and Mbulelo Mzamane’s The Children of Soweto (1982). Don Mattera has written an account of life in Sophiatown, and its destruction, Memory is the Weapon (1987).The emergency years A mass democratic movement, based on the ideals of the Freedom Charter, arose within the country in the 1980s and the state responded with successive states of emergency that brought white troops to the townships.In the face of this, poets such as the orator Mzwakhe Mbuli reached vast audiences, while novelists such as Menan du Plessis and Mandla Langa engaged with the business of resistance to apartheid.Yet, at the same time, some felt the need for a move away from rhetoric and toward the depiction of ordinary life and Njabulo Ndebele, in his 1986 essay, The Rediscovery of the Ordinary expressed this view, seeing politically determined work as inimical to a full depiction of rounded humanity in fiction. His own fiction, in the award-winning collection, Fools and Other Stories (1983), demonstrated that it could be done with grace. The main story, Fools was later reworked into a movie with an all-South African cast.Like Ndebele, JM Coetzee, one of South Africa’s most lauded writers in the 1970s, dealt in subtle ways with issues of power, authority and history. One of the key works of recent South African writing, Coetzee’s novel Waiting for the Barbarians (1980) tackles issues germane to South Africa. His next novel, Life and Times of Michael K (1983), a story of a poor man of colour trying to survive in a civil-war situation, won the Booker Prize in Britain. Age of Iron (1990) takes the perspective of a white academic who is dying even as the townships explode with violence.Coetzee’s next novel, Disgrace (1999), won him a second Booker Prize and caused huge debate in South Africa over its depiction of a post-apartheid reality in which the wounds of the past have not been healed – and new ones are being inflicted. A film of the book, starring John Malkovitch, had its world premier at the Toronto Film Festival in 2008, where it won the International Critics’ Award.An illustrious literary academic, Coetzee published Doubling the Point (1992), and has published a memoir of growing up in South Africa, Boyhood (1998).His more recent works include The Lives of Animals , edited and introduced by Amy Gutmann (1999); The Humanities in Africa – Die Geisteswissenschaften in Afrika (2001); Stranger Shores: Essays, 1986 to 1999 (2001); and two more novels, Youth (2002) and Slow Man (2005).Coetzee was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2003 and the Order of Mapungubwe by the South African government on 27 September 2005 for his “exceptional contribution in the field of literature and for putting South Africa on the world stage.”Back to topAfter apartheid The most prominent question asked of South African writers after the end of apartheid and the release of Nelson Mandela in 1990 was: what will you write about since the primary topic has gone?Well, apartheid may have died, but its effects linger on, and as writers such as Coetzee have demonstrated, the issues of power that haunted the apartheid era are still in many ways with us. The early years of democracy were characterized by a new form of writing which literary critic Stephane Serge Ibinga describes as ‘honeymoon literature’ or ‘the literature of celebration’.One of the most acclaimed of these post-democracy writers is Zakes Mda, who worked for many years as a playwright and poet before publishing his first novels in 1995. He started with two novels, She Plays with the Darkness and Ways of Dying . The latter, the story of a professional mourner, won the M-Net Book Prize. His next novel, The Heart of Redness (2001), won the Commonwealth Prize; it contrasts the past of the 19th century, when the prophetess Nongqawuse brought ruin to the Xhosa people, with a present-day narrative.Ivan Vladislavic is another author pushing into the post-apartheid future, with distinctly post-modern works that play with the conventions of fiction as much as they speak about contemporary realties in South Africa today. He has published two collections of stories, Missing Persons (1990) and Propaganda by Monuments (2000), and two novels, The Folly (1993) and The Restless Supermarket (2001).One of the most irreverent voices to hit the South African literary scene over the past decade is poet Lesego Rampolokeng. His poems are published in Horns for Hondo (1991) and End Beginnings (1993). A powerful live performer of his work, he has collaborated with musicians as well.K Sello Duiker is a young novelist who has recently made a splash in South Africa with two novels that have won him awards and critical acclaim, Thirteen Cents (2000) and The Quiet Violence of Dreams (2001). Set in the urban landscape of Cape Town, the two novels see the world through the eyes of the underdog, a street kid in the first and an ostracised gay student in the second.Mark Behr has been one of the most compelling and controversial additions to the South African literary canon. His first novel, The Smell of Apples (1997), tells of white South Africans who were brainwashed by the apartheid system. Soon after that, Behr admitted that he had been a spy for the apartheid police while a student activist; a graphic illustration, if one were needed, of the divided loyalties felt by many whites in that period. Behr’s second novel, Embrace (2000), deals with the formative experiences of a young homosexual.There are many South African writers still dealing with the legacy of apartheid and the struggle against it, as South Africa finds a new national – and hybrid – identity. One is Zoe Wicomb, whose new novel, David’s Story (2001, winner of the M-Net Book Prize), interrogates the past and present of an anti-apartheid activist, as does Achmat Dangor’s Bitter Fruit (2001).Mike Nicol’s first novel, The Powers That Be (1989), brought a magic-realist sensibility to South African literature, and his latest, The Ibis Tapestry (1998) is a post-modern take on the secrets of South Africa’s apartheid abuses. Among Afrikaans writers now translated into English, notable works have come from Etienne van Heerden, particularly the marvellous Ancestral Voices (1989), and from Marlene Van Niekerk, with the hilarious and horrifying Triomf (1994).Phaswane Mpe’s Welcome to Our Hillbrow (2001) is a critically acclaimed view of the physical and moral decay in both the rural areas of Tiragalong and the urban ghetto of Hillbrow. Kgafela wa Magogodi is a poet who probes issues such as Aids in his collection Thy Condom Come (2000).Some quarters have observed that post-liberation writing has shifted from the representation of racial division to that of class difference, reflecting the new social fabric. In fact, writers have become interested in class relationships rather than race since the government’s black empowerment policy began to help black people join the circle of the white bourgeoisie, while the poor comprise both races even though blacks still dominate this group.Also, a common feature in post-apartheid literature is a concern with nation-building projects. Various authors have explored the possibility of re-assessing past identities in order to construct a new national identity based on a transcultural perspective.Back to topWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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VoIP Over 3G Comes to the iPhone – And Maybe Even the iPad

first_imgTags:#NYT#voice#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market See also: ReadWriteWeb’s complete coverage and analysis of the iPad on our iPad topic page. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Yesterday’s iPad launch continues to dominate the tech news today. Besides announcing the iPad, however, Apple also quietly announced a major change to its iPhone policies yesterday: Apple now allows developers to use a 3G connection to make VoIP calls. The first application to make use of this is iCall (iTunes link), but chances are that Skype, Truphone and other VoIP providers are already working on updated iPhone apps as well. Until now, Apple’s iPhone SDK prohibited developers from developing VoIP-enabled apps that used the carrier’s 3G network. Developers who wanted to use VoIP in their apps had to restrict themselves to using this feature over Wi-Fi connections only. This restriction was purely Apple’s decision. AT&T had already lifted its own ban on VoIP apps over 3G last October. Back then, Skype’s CEO, Josh Silverman, praised AT&T for this move and called it “the right step for AT&T, Apple, millions of mobile Skype users and the Internet itself.”In our own tests, the iCall application worked just like advertised, though we did experience some lag and the application wasn’t 100% stable.VoIP and the iPad?While the iPad won’t have any built-in telephony apps, some versions of the device will come with optional 3G connectivity. Thanks to today’s change in Apple’s iPhone SDK policies, the iPad – which features a built-in microphone – now has the potential to work as a VoIP phone as well. We still have to wait and see if Apple will allow this, however. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… frederic lardinoislast_img read more

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IBM Makes Firefox its Default Browser

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Browsers#news#web mike melanson Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Related Posts IBM’s Bob Sutor, vice president of open source and Linux, announced this morning that Big Blue is “moving to Firefox as its default browser” because the open-source browser is “stunningly standards compliant”, “not beholden to one commercial entity” and “extensible” among other reasons.The decision puts IBM’s nearly 400,000 employees solidly in Mozilla’s court, adding yet another vote of confidence for the worlds number two browser.According to Web analytics site StatCounter, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer still leads the pack worldwide, with 55%, while Firefox follows with just under 30% and Google’s Chrome rounds out the top three with 8%. While 400,000 users doesn’t mean a big percentage jump in the worldwide browser market, it is a backing by one of the world’s leading hardware and software developers. Sutor reasoned that the switchover to Firefox was supported by five basic facts:Firefox is stunningly standards compliant, and interoperability via open standards is key to IBM’s strategy.Firefox is open source and its development schedule is managed by a development community not beholden to one commercial entity.Firefox is secure and an international community of experts continues to develop and maintain it.Firefox is extensible and can be customized for particular applications and organizations, like IBM.Firefox is innovative and has forced the hand of browsers that came before and after it to add and improve speed and function.Beyond IBM’s workforce, the 99-year-old tech company will “strongly encourage our vendors who have browser-based software to fully support Firefox” as well as install it as default on all new computers. Sutor also cites the shift to cloud computing as a large reason for IBM’s move to Firefox, saying that “open standards must be used in the infrastructure” and that Firefox will help with this. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Microsoft Research Watch: AI, NoSQL and Microsoft’s Big Data Future

first_imgThe project site claims that Probase is richer than other ontology/taxonomy knowledge bases like the ones mentioned above because it structures data according to three dimensions: concept, data and relationship dimension. Its concept dimension contains about 2.7 million concepts. According to the Probase site, Freebase contains 1,450 concepts, DBPedia contains 259 and ResearchCyc contains approximately 120,000.One of the most important elements of Probase is that it doesn’t regard the data it contains as facts. “Data in Probase, as knowledge in our mind, is not black or white,” the site says. “Probase quantifies the uncertainty.” Here’s a more expanded explanation:Probase has a large data space. As an example, Cyc contains about two dozen painters, while Probase has close to 1,000 of them ordered by their popularity. The importance of data scale becomes more apparent for less frequently used concepts, or concepts on the long tail. Take the concept Chinese provinces as an example, Cyc does not contain a complete list of Chinese provinces, while Probase has all the provinces (ranked by popularity). The reason that Probase is able to accumulate a large amount of data is because of its probabilistic nature. We do not regard the data in Probase as facts, instead, we regard them as claims or beliefs associated with probabilities modeling their plausibility, ambiguity, and other characteristics. Furthermore, we regard external data, such as the Web, Freebase, DBPedia, dictionaries and encyclopedias, IMDB, Amazon, etc., as evidences that can add to or modify the claims and beliefs in Probase. This means Probase is able to integrate information of varied quality from heterogeneous data sources.For more background on the problems posed by this sort of project, research the history of Cyc.This would be very useful in Microsoft Bing, which was originally billed as a more semantically intelligent search engine. In 2008 Microsoft acquired Powerset, a semantic search engine that searched Freebase and Wikipedia for answers. According to former Powerset engineers on Quora, the technology may have been used in Bing Reference.Google acquired Metaweb, the company that developed Freebase, last year.TrinityAccording to the site, the main features of Trinity are:Data model: hypergraph.Distributed: Trinity can be deployed on one machine or hundreds of machines.A graph database: Trinity is a memory-based graph store with rich database features, including highly concurrent online query processing, ACI transaction support, etc. Currently, Trinity provides C# APIs to the user for graph processing.A parallel graph processing system: Trinity supports large scale, offline batch processing. Both Synchronous and Asynchronous batch computation is supported.Here’s an illustration of its architecture: Probase is a Microsoft Research project described as an “ongoing project that focuses on knowledge acquisition and knowledge serving.” Its primary goal is to “enable machines to understand human behavior and human communication.” It can be compared to Cyc, DBpedia or Freebase in that it is attempting to compile a massive collection of structured data that can be used to power artificial intelligence applications.It’s powered by a new graph database called Trinity, which is also a Microsoft Research project. Trinity was spotted today by MyNoSQL blogger Alex Popescu, and that led us to Probase. Neither project seems to be available to the public yet.These and other projects shed some light on Microsoft’s search and big data ambitions.Probase Tags:#cloud#Trends Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Microsoft’s other NoSQL related projects include Windows Azure Table Storage, a big table-based database for the Azure platform, and Dryad, an alternative to Hadoop.Other examples of graph databases include Neo4j, HyperGraphDB, InfiniteGraph and FlockDB.The FutureIt’s not hard to connect the dots between Bing, Dryad, Probase and Trinity. Microsoft is building a set of tools to rival those used internally at Google and the open source tools used by companies like Facebook and Twitter. The interesting thing will be what Microsoft does with its data.RedMonk analyst and co-founder Stephen O’Grady looked at the value of software in a recent blog post. O’Grady looked at the changing role software over three generations, using Microsoft, Google and Facebook as the primary examples.For Microsoft, software has always been the product. Google turned this around, by using proprietary software and custom infrastructure to power a service. Facebook takes this a step further – it uses commodity open source software. It uses PHP and MySQL and gives away custom in house software like Cassandra and Hip Hop. Its strategic advantage is in its data.Although Microsoft probably won’t give away Dryad or Trinity, it looks like it might be moving towards the Facebook model. Will Microsoft be able to turn itself around and become a data company instead of a software company?Lead image by nasa1fan/MSFC klint finleylast_img read more

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Death toll in Barmer mishap climbs to 15

first_imgThe death toll in the mishap at Jasol in Rajasthan’s Barmer district, where a large tent collapsed on a crowd of devotees in sudden rain and a squall, climbed to 15 on Monday with an eight-year-boy, shifted to Jodhpur for treatment, succumbing to his injuries.The deceased, identified as Pokar Ram, was rushed to Jodhpur’s All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) on Sunday after he sustained serious injuries and was electrocuted in the incident. Police said a case would be registered against the organisers of the ‘Ram Katha’ event in Jasol after the completion of relief and rescue measures.CM meetsChief Minister Ashok Gehlot met the grieving families of the victims in Jasol and expressed his condolences. He also went to Nahata Government Hospital in Balotra and Mathura Das Mathur Hospital in Jodhpur to meet the injured persons admitted there.Mr. Gehlot said he had ordered an inquiry into the incident and added that the State government would take steps to prevent such incidents in future on the basis of report of the probe, to be conducted by Jodhpur Divisional Commissioner. “Stringent action will be taken against those whose negligence is proved…I am deeply saddened by the tragedy,” he said.Assistance announcedThe State government has announced financial assistance of ₹5 lakh each to the next of kin of the deceased and ₹2 lakh each to those injured.Union Minister of State for Agriculture and Barmer MP Kailash Chaudhary also visited the hospitals where the injured have been admitted, to enquire about their condition. Most of those killed were from different villages in the Barmer district, who had come to Jasol village, situated 97 km away from the district headquarters, to attend the ‘Ram Katha’ narrated by Muralidhar Maharaj. The religious congregation, which started on Saturday, was organised by the Mata Rani Bhatiyani Mandir Sansthan of Jasol.last_img read more

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Lyceum eyes first-round sweep

first_imgCatriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Read Next MOST READ Lyceum may be favored to complete a first-round sweep against tailender Mapua, but coach Topex Robinson wants his Pirates to remember how they nearly absorbed a first loss against Letran.Robinson said the scare—where Lyceum had to rally from 17 points down against Letran—only showed that the Pirates have more to work on as they gun for a ninth straight triumph in the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Game time is 2 p.m. Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan where the Pirates hope to bank on CJ Perez’s explosive game anew.“Honestly, we didn’t discuss about a potential sweep but rather we want to be a better version of ourselves from our Letran game,” said Robinson.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutPerpetual Help and Emilio Aguinaldo College, tied at 3-5, tangle at 4 p.m., while struggling teams Arellano (2-5) and St. Benilde (2-6) clash at 12 noon.Last Friday, the Pirates played minus Robinson, who served a one-game suspension. LATEST STORIES SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short programcenter_img NCAA Season 93 Preview: Lyceum Pirates PLAY LIST 02:00NCAA Season 93 Preview: Lyceum Pirates00:50Trending Articles00:33Duterte mulling ban on plastic use01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. But the Pirates said his absence wasn’t an excuse for the team’s poor start against the Knights.“We just want to continue to play the game right,” said assistant coach Jeff Perlas, who called the shots in the Pirates’ comeback win over the Knights, 75-68. —JASMINE W. PAYO Pingris rejoins Star practice, set for return LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games View comments Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s weddinglast_img read more

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