War Memorial is a symbol of inclusiveness and enlightenment

first_imgNewsCommunityWar Memorial is a symbol of inclusiveness and enlightenmentBy Staff Reporter – August 11, 2017 2374 World Wars memorial on Pery Square. Picture: Cian ReinhardtLimerick War Memorial on Pery Square. Picture: Cian ReinhardtIt has been bombed, boycotted and condemned as a symbol of British imperialism, yet the Limerick War Memorial in Pery Square is a potent reminder that the legacy of loss from the First World War transcends religious, political and social divisions. Dr Tadhg Moloney tells the story of how the memorial survived revisionism, ignorance and prejudice.Eleven years after the end of the First World War, in which at least 3,000 officers and men from Limerick City and County died, a memorial in their honour and a place where the ex-servicemen and people of Limerick could come to pay homage was unveiled.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The conditions created by the War of Independence and Civil War meant it was only in 1924 that Roman Catholic ex-servicemen could hold a service of remembrance at St. Joseph’s Church. They continued to use this church until 1927 when the ceremony was transferred to St. John’s Cathedral.By the time Remembrance Day came in 1922, a memorial had been unveiled in St. Mary’s Cathedral to the ‘Men of Thomond who fell in the war 1914-1918’. However, because this was a Protestant church, the attendance of Roman Catholic ex-servicemen was precluded. Six years later another memorial was unveiled, this time in the Presbyterian Church, Lower Mallow Street.Personal memorials had been erected by families to their sons who died in the war, most notably in St Mary’s Cathedral. One of those is in memory of Captain Gordon Thompson Shaw killed in action on August 28, 1918, serving with the Royal Munster Fusiliers. He was the son of Alexander William Shaw, a leading bacon merchant in Limerick City.The only memorial to a Limerick Roman Catholic soldier killed in the First World War is to be found in St. Munchin’s Roman Catholic Church.  This memorial is in the form of a baptistery and was donated by Sir Vincent and Lady Nash to the memory of their son, Lieutenant James Haran Nash, who was killed serving with the Irish Guards on March 27, 1918.Limerick still lacked a suitable monument where people irrespective of religious persuasion could commemorate their war dead.However, on June 6, 1928 a deputation consisting of two members of the Limerick Branch of the Legion of ex-Servicemen, Captains David Tidmarsh and Eric R. Shaw, who was also a Borough Councillor, appeared before the Corporation Improvement Committee to support their application for the erection of a suitable memorial. The following day a letter was read to a full meeting of the Corporation from the Chairman of the Limerick Branch of the British Legion, which included a scale drawing of Pery Square and the location of where they would like the memorial to be erected covering an area of four square yards.Permission was granted to erect the memorial in the Square by twenty-two votes to four, with Councillor C Gilligan abstaining, giving his reason for doing so on the basis that he was ‘opposed to the memorial on national grounds’. Those who voted against the proposal wanted the memorial situated in the People’s Park. There may also have been an underlying motive in having it located in the People’s Park and that was ‘out of sight, out of mind’. Councillor P O’Callaghan threatened to have it pulled down when it was erected.Another indication that a public war memorial was going to be erected in Limerick was made at an Armistice dinner in the British Legion Hall, Lower Hartstonge Street on November 14, 1928 when Irish Legion Chairman A.P Connolly declared that ‘they were at last to have their war memorial in Limerick, a fact that reflected honour on the generous people of that city and county.  Such a memorial would keep the grand ideal for which the men had fallen before them, and be an inspiration to them in the future’.A list of subscribers published on November 9, 1929 showed that £357.10s.0d. had been contributed towards the required amount of £550.  The willingness of people to subscribe is shown by a further list, published a month later, showing that the amount contributed had risen to £469.1s.0d, leaving an outstanding debt of £80.19s.0d.Many of the 157 subscribers had relatives killed in the war or had served during the conflict. The individual amounts were not disclosed, signifying that the subscribers paid whether small or large were of equal importance.The site for the memorial, a 20-foot version of the Cross of Sacrifice on an octagonal base with a bronze sword on its shaft, was donated by the City Council in the middle of the square directly opposite the Carnegie Library.  Designed by Sir Reginald Bloomfield and constructed by Messrs CW Harrison and Sons, it was built of finely chiselled white Irish granite, of which one of the parts is mica, a material that sparkles in the sun or artificial light and bore the following inscription:To the glory of God, and to the memory of 3,000 officers, NCOs and men of Limerick City and County who fell in the Great War, 1914-18. They died in every quarter of the earth and on its seas, and their names have with reverence and love been inscribed on our rolls of honour. Most of them lie buried in the lands of our Allies, who have set aside their resting place in honour for ever.On November 10, 1929, both Catholic and Protestant ex-servicemen held separate services after which they marched to the memorial. The Protestant service was held in St. Mary’s Cathedral where ‘the sacred edifice had been filled to overflowing by a congregation representing all Protestant denominations in the city and county’ many of whom were ex-Servicemen, wearing their medals and decorations. A wreath on behalf of the Limerick Branch of the British Legion was laid at the Thomond War Memorial by Major-General Sir George Franks. The memorial Mass was held in St John’s Cathedral after which least six hundred ex-Servicemen, preceded by the Sarsfield Fife and Drum Band marched from John’s Square to Pery Square where a large crowd had gathered, including many women wearing their deceased husband’s, father’s or brother’s medals and decorations.President of the British Legion in the Irish Free State Major-General Sir William Hickie, who had commanded the 16th Irish Division in France during the First World War and was therefore well known to and respected by the general body of the Ex-Servicemen present, unveiled the Cross which had been covered with a purple drape, symbolising the sacrifice of the men that the memorial commemorated.In his address, he stressed that the sacrifice of the men to whom the memorial was erected was made for the highest motives and he made particular mention of the defence of Belgium. He also insisted that the basic motivation of the Allies in going to war had been honourable and made a plea for tolerance and understanding of differing points of view which he noted were absent in contemporary Ireland but which the occasion showed existed, as they always had, in Limerick:“It is most fitting that this ancient city should have within its boundaries a monument which will not only stand to the glorious memory of those of her gallant sons who gave their lives in the cause of freedom and justice in the Great War, but will also serve to remind everyone of the great number of men from the County of Limerick, and from this its capital city, who took a distinguished part in the campaign of the Great War, and of the exemplary and gallant manner in which they carried out their self imposed duties. What we want most in Ireland to-day is that brotherly spirit which will recognise that we are all Irishmen of one great family, who are striving according to our lights, to do our best for the country which we love. Opinions and methods may differ, but nothing is to be gained by unkind criticism, by harsh words, or by wilful misunderstanding. Limerick has always set an example of that broad-mindedness and of that kindly spirit which are also, so noticeably absent at times from our public life. The cross now takes its place with the three crosses of Irish granite which stand respectively at Wytschaete in Flanders, at Guillemont and on the Somme in France and on the Serbian heights above Lake Doiran, as lasting memorials to those fifty thousand of our comrades who went out and who did not come back.” While no wreath was laid on behalf of the Catholic Church quite a number of clergy were present at the ceremony, some of whom were ex-Chaplains to the army during the war. There was no official representation by the City Council at the ceremony. Although they had received an invitation, the Mayor decided that the vote to officially attend was unsuccessful ‘when four members voted for not accepting the invitation and seven for accepting.The only member of the Council who attend in a private capacity was Alderman P O’Flynn.The attendance of the Mayor and Council in an official capacity at the unveiling ceremony was obviously a step too far.It wasn’t until 1991, sixty-two years after the unveiling before Mayor Jim Kemmy attended and laid a wreath on behalf of the city council, thereby establishing a precedent that has continued to this day.The ex-Servicemen now had a place to go to pay homage to their fallen comrades. Every year, with the exception of the years 1939-45, they assembled at the Cross on the nearest Sunday to the eleventh day of November, the date of the end of the war.After the Second World War, a plaque was added to the war memorial to commemorate the Limerick men from Limerick who were killed in action serving with the Allies during that conflict.Not everyone agreed with what the war memorial symbolised or the sentiments expressed on it and during the early hours of  August 7, 1957 it was destroyed by an explosion. The Secretary of the Limerick Branch of the British Legion, Mr John Ring, declared that the war memorial ‘had no political significance and was merely there to commemorate our Limerick men who were killed in the First World War and also in the Second World War.  That was the only purpose of it’.The day after the explosion, the Limerick Chronicle published a disclaimer from ‘the local Secretary of a Proscribed organisation stating that the organisation was not responsible for the blowing up of the War Memorial and that no member of the Republican Movement was involved in the incident’.No group or individuals ever took responsibility for this action and nobody was apprehended for it, though its occurrence during the IRA border campaign pointed to the most likely source. The death of Limerick man Seán Sabhat the previous January may also have been a relevant factor.However, like the phoenix rising from the ashes, a new war memorial was built on the base of the old Cross of Sacrifice to symbolise a new era of inclusion and enlightenment.Read similar articles in the Limerick Post Community section. Print Previous articleUL Eagles basketball aim to soar back to top tierNext articleEVA International Director reacts to funding criticism Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Linkedincenter_img Email Twitter Facebook WhatsApplast_img read more

Read More »

Farmers’ Future.

first_imgIf any farmer could make a profit farming, it would have to be Jimmie Lee Moss. But in the fourth straight year of a drought, the Irwin County farmer now questions whether his children and grandchildren should follow in his dusty footsteps.Moss continues to scratch out hope from dry fields. “There’s moisture down there,” Moss says as he digs through bright, sandy, dry soil. “There are peanuts down there.”But Moss says he hasn’t really made a profit since 1979. “I’ve been breaking even, that’s about all,” he says as he sits on the tailgate of his truck with his 19-year-old grandson Tra.Only Full-time Farmer LeftA few yards away, an old farm house illustrates the good old days. “Back in the years, four or five families lived on the farm and worked it,” Moss remembers.Now, at age 71, Moss is the only full-time worker of the 350-acre farm, a bit larger than the Georgia average of 222 acres. He doesn’t have a lot of the modern conveniences.The tractor he used to plant his peanuts doesn’t have air conditioning. A piece of clothes-hanger wire keeps him from using the tractor’s right brake because it needs expensive major repair. He uses old, labor-intensive irrigation pipes, popular back in the 1950s and ‘60s, to water his crops.Doing Without”Like many farmers, he’s gone without things,” said Keith Kightlinger, who analyzes farm records for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “He’s survived by making do.”Moss figures it would take about $100,000 to modernize his farm. But he’s reluctant to borrow the money, even though he’s healthy. “It’s too risky at my age to try to make the money to pay for it,” he says.For farmers who borrow a lot of money to make capital improvements, Kightlinger said, it can take several years for their investments to pay off the debt. “One or two bad years in a row,” he said, “can often just completely wipe that out.”Living on the EdgeMoss represents many farmers who live on the financial edge these days. “Most farmers today,” Kightlinger said, “are looking for ways to reduce their financial risk.”In Moss’ case, he may allow two of his sons to borrow the money for the improvements. He’ll help them work the land, while they handle the finances.But when it comes to Tra becoming a farmer, he has a strong opinion. “I hope not,” he says.But Tra doesn’t rule it out. “I don’t know what to do,” he says. “I guess it depends on when I get out of college, how I feel then.” Teenagers often choose to learn about life the hard way. Photo: Joe Courson Sharing the tailgate of his pickup with his grandson Tra, Jimmie Lee Moss (left), ponders his farm’s future.last_img read more

Read More »

Packers coach Matt LaFleur texts his buddy Robert Saleh: Got some tips?

first_imgSANTA CLARA — The 49ers’ defense is tops in the NFL. First-year Packers coach Matt LaFleur thought he might have an exclusive advantage for his team heading into the Week 12 matchup.He whipped out his phone and shot 49ers defensive coordinator Robert Saleh a text.“I asked him to call me,” LaFleur said. “I shot him a text message and said ‘Hey, would you give me a call? I got a couple questions about your defense.’”Saleh laughed. There would be no hints exchanged between these two close, …last_img read more

Read More »

Grand Canyon: How Do You Get a River Over a Mountain?

first_imgOne would think that the Grand Canyon, one of earth’s most prominent geological features, studied by geologists for 140 years, would be well understood.  Wrong.  “The Colorado River’s integration off the Colorado Plateau remains a classic mystery in geology, despite its pivotal role in the cutting of Grand Canyon and the region’s landscape evolution.”  That’s how Joel Pederson (Utah State) began the cover article in GSA Today this month,1 a bimonthly journal of the Geological Society of America.  The mystery he investigated is how the Colorado River ran over a mountain: the Kaibab uplift.    The Kaibab uplift is the broad southern end of the Colorado Plateau through which the Grand Canyon has been carved.  Rivers do not normally flow uphill.  The upper Colorado River, roaring from Rocky Mountain snow melt, faces this obstacle; yet here the Grand Canyon cuts right into the plateau at a steep monocline that extends north-south through Utah, and manages to run westward through the high province till emerging from the Grand Wash Cliffs at the west edge of the plateau.  There, at modern Lake Mead, the river suddenly enters the Basin and Range province of Nevada.  It flows onward to the southwest, emerging at the Gulf of California (a nice tour to take in Google Earth).    Of the many theories to explain this phenomenon since John Wesley Powell ran the river for the first time in the 1870s, three have survived.  (Powell’s own idea that the river cut downward as the plateau raised upward did not last long, because of dating discrepancies: the plateau was thought to rise much earlier than the river.)  If there had been an antecedent river, where is the huge delta that should have formed at its terminus?  His own study showed that the Muddy Creek Formation (Google Earth, 36°42’45” N, 114°19’40” W) looks more like drainage from the ancestral Virgin River, not the Colorado.  If the early river had exited through the Little Colorado, why is there no evidence at that location?  The least-likely explanation had been the “precocious gully” theory of Charlie Hunt.  Beginning in 1956, Hunt imagined a southwestern river cutting headward into the plateau and joining up with the ancestral Colorado river.  “Hunt’s hypothesis (b), that the river arrived in the central-western Grand Canyon area and simply infiltrated and terminated, never gained traction—and was not well loved even by Hunt himself,” Pederson said.    Surprisingly, that is exactly the theory Pederson tries to resurrect in this paper.  It’s not so much that it is a good hypothesis; it is just the best of the worst.  His last sentence makes that clear: “For now, Hunt’s dissipation and infiltration hypothesis is the last one left standing against the geologic evidence in the region.”  Pederson knows the problems with Hunt’s theory: “How could the head of a single drainage along a desert escarpment have the necessary stream power or mass-movement activity to erode headward and shift its divide hundreds of kilometers, when none of its neighbors could lengthen measurably at all?”  He tried to dress it up by suggesting that karst topography in the plateau (underground rivers and springs) made it easier for the precocious gully to work its way uphill, but his conclusion did not make it sound like he felt confident about it.    Much of Pederson’s predicament seems to come from two factors: (1) dates for formations based on the standard geological column, and (2) processes assumed to be slow and gradual.  He did not reference Karlstrom’s paper in the November issue that came to a surprising conclusion (11/30/2007): the Grand Canyon is much younger than previously thought.  He also completely ignored the work of creationist geologists who have proposed catastrophic formation models for the canyon.Update 03/07/2008: No sooner had this article gone to press when Science published a paper claiming the Grand Canyon is old again.2  Radiometric dates of cave formations in the Redwall limestone led a team to propose a new date of 16-20 million years, rather than 5-6 million as lately believed.  They also held to the precocious gully theory, “a fully integrated Colorado River that accelerated the headward erosion of the eastern Grand Canyon.”  They admitted, though, that “our interpretation assumes no structural or hydrologic complexities” – just a framework for dating the canyon.    Tim Atkinson and Mike Leeder, in the same issue of Science,3 triumphantly announced that since Hutton’s first conception of “the immensity of geologic time” in 1788, “we now understand Earth’s sedimentary history in remarkable detail.”  They claim this new paper demonstrates the older age firmly for the first time.  It required, however, juggling incision rates with plateau erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates.  The authors noted a number of inconsistencies in their data.  They appealed to ad-hoc processes to explain them and hoped for answers in the future: e.g., “Structure, hydrology, or headward erosion history … might resolve these differences when additional data are available.”  Their method only offered “potential for a reconstruction of the canyon’s history” with all its complexities.  It seems presumptuous, therefore, for Atkinson and Leeder to say older age has been firmly demonstrated.    Whether incision rates can be extrapolated backward in time depends on one’s assumptions  At Mt. St. Helens, for instance, a remnant stream flows through the bottom of a canyon system resembling Grand Canyon on a 1/40 scale.  A casual observer in 2008 might think the stream carved the canyon.  We know in this case, however, that the stream neither cut the canyon nor deposited the sediments.  Observers in 1980-81 watched the layers deposited catastrophically during three explosive episodes.  Later, the entire canyon system was carved in one day through the layers when a mudflow spilled out of the crater.1.  Joel L. Pederson, “The mystery of the pre-Grand Canyon Colorado River—Results from the Muddy Creek Formation,” GSA Today Vol 18, Issue 3 (March 2008), pp. 4-10.2.  Polyak, Hill and Asmerom, “Age and Evolution of the Grand Canyon Revealed by U-Pb Dating of Water Table-Type Speleothems,” Science, 7 March 2008: Vol. 319. no. 5868, pp. 1377-1380, DOI: 10.1126/science.1151248.3.  Tim Atkinson and Mike Leeder, “Canyon Cutting on a Grand Time Scale,” Science, 7 March 2008: Vol. 319. no. 5868, pp. 1343-1344, DOI: 10.1126/science.1155286.The lesson of J Harlen Bretz has not been learned by the secular anti-creationist, uniformitarian geological community represented by the GSA.  Bretz was ridiculed and ignored for nearly 50 years when he proposed a catastrophic origin for the Channeled Scablands of east Washington (see quote, top right of this page).  Fortunately for him, he was eventually vindicated.    The secular geologists are trapped in their old-age, uniformitarian box and cannot think outside it.  What if that is where the solutions are?  Creationist geologists and scientists like Walt Brown and Steve Austin have done extensive work, both hands-on field work and mathematical modeling, showing how the Grand Canyon can be explained by a catastrophic dam-breach event from impounded lakes northeast of the canyon that remained after the Flood.  These models explain why the river cut through the Colorado Plateau but left no delta in Nevada (most of the erosional load went all the way to California and the ocean).  They explain many details of the canyon’s structure, such as the vast sheet erosion of sediments above the canyon with its remnants at Cedar Mountain and Red Butte (for an excellent short article on this topic, see Bill Hoesch’s March entry in ICR’s ’s Acts and Facts newsletter).  Brown first suggested the dam breach theory and has traveled throughout Arizona and Utah, finding firsthand evidence for a vast upstream lake system that could have cut the entire canyon (just like the Scablands flood), in a matter of days.  Austin found a 1/40th scale model canyon system that formed at Mt. St. Helens when a mudflow breached a dam.  There is both a large-scale, real-time exemplar for the catastrophist model and a good deal of on-site fieldwork throughout the Colorado Plateau to support it.  (Incidentally, Austin, PhD in geology from Penn State, discusses the “precocious gully” theory and the other gradualist theories in his richly-informed book, Grand Canyon: Monument to Catastrophe.)    The secular geologists completely ignore all this.  It’s not that Pederson and the GSA crowd are smarter or more knowledgeable about geology and science in general than the creationists.  They are a clique.  When the science of geology was young, the majority of influential persons, who were theologically liberal and philosophically progressivist in outlook, made a decision: they would not consider the Bible as a historical source.  They would go the route of Comte du Buffon and James Hutton and would trust their own opinions within a paradigm of vast ages of time.  This decision was cemented in the 1830s.  Prior to any examination of evidence, and in spite of evidence for youth and catastrophism, this was the paradigm into which all evidence would be molded.  The trend was strongly denounced by a vocal minority of “scriptural geologists” some of whom were highly learned and knowledgeable (documented in Terry Mortenson’s book, The Great Turning Point), but the progressivists won the day.  Their views fed perfectly into Charles Darwin’s gradualist, progressivist views.    The secular geological crowd has clung to their paradigm with a vengeance ever since.  And we mean vengeance.  J Harlen Bretz got a taste of it, but he didn’t propose a young earth or suggest that the Bible might contain some trustworthy historical records that could inform geology.  Try that point of view and you will not believe the denunciations and ostracism you will get – even though the father of geology, Nicolas Steno, was a creationist.    So we are left with a steep divide in geology – a grand canyon – between two paradigms.  The majority secularists, possessing most of the prestige and money, are scratching their heads over the most prominent geological feature on earth with only a best-of-the-worst explanation for it (see 09/16/2005, for instance).  On the other hand, the creationist geologists feel very confident they have a reasonable catastrophic model for the Grand Canyon that fits the evidence from all angles.  The secular crowd completely ignores them.  If Pederson had referenced Steve Austin’s Grand Canyon: Monument to Catastrophe or Walt Brown’s In the Beginning, or even mentioned these with intent to refute them, it would have been a one-way ticket to GSA Purgatory.  Before the evidence and arguments would have even been considered on their merits, Pederson would have been condemned, ostracized, marginalized and disfellowshiped for life for even bringing heretics into the discussion.  One could imagine the same reaction occurring even if Pederson had “independently” proposed a Bretz-like dam-breach theory, without any theological baggage at all.  This would certainly be possible.  The dam-breach theory stands entirely on well-known physical processes.  It contains no necessary links to the Biblical Flood (other than that the Flood is the most reasonable explanation for the vast inland lakes and for the strata themselves).  No matter.  Sounding too much like a creationist is reason enough for condemnation.  The creation geologists, by contrast, freely examine and reference the GSA literature in addition to their own field work and have no hesitation going to GSA meetings (when they can) and discussing their views.    If you think modern geology is done by an unbiased, neutral, open-minded community that will cheerfully follow the evidence wherever it leads, get over it.  If you think geological theories distil the best thinking from all quarters, get a life.  (Check out this list of examples of suppression of new ideas and innovation by scientists and self-proclaimed experts.)  Many individual geologists are honest people doing the best work they can within their paradigm.  By honest, we mean that they are not intentionally lying, but they are so brainwashed to think only in terms of the Standard Geological Column and all of its reified evolution-based dating schemes that alternative points of view never enter their thinking.  With few exceptions, they have been trained like Pavlov’s dogs to bark “religious fundamentalist alert!” when a creationist appears on the scene.  Some GSA types are brave enough to be mavericks, within limits; but this is like moving away from the crowd inside a corner of the box – never thinking outside of it.    How about an outside-the-box look at the evidence with your own eyes?  Creation Safaris leads 3-day rafting trips down the Grand Canyon in conjunction with Canyon Ministries.  On these fun and educational adventures, you can witness huge features that make perfect sense in terms of a global flood and catastrophic formation of the canyon – features that present major problems for slow, gradualistic theories.  This year’s trip is sold out, unfortunately, but you can send a message to the Feedback line to tell us you are interested in a future opportunity.(Visited 176 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More »

Outlook Sees First Trickle of Social Stream

first_imgWhile privacy concerns are huge for Microsoft’s customers, we have to wonder, like many others, about another concern – whether or not businesses really want social networks appearing in the company inbox.As Will Kennedy, a corporate vice president for the Office group, was quoted as saying in the AP article on today’s announcement, “We don’t want this to sort of be the next great time waster in the workplace.”Perhaps this roll-out is like slowly heating the water so the frog doesn’t jump out – if you get everyone acquainted with LinkedIn first, they won’t run away when Facebook and Myspace come around. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#Facebook#Google#Microsoft#MySpace#news#social networks#Social Web#web Related Posts Everybody is getting in the game. Google just announced Buzz, its social feed add-on to Gmail, last week and today Microsoft is bringing the feed to Outlook. Microsoft first announced its social media add-on, the Outlook Social Connector, last November but today begins the public beta period for LinkedIn for Outlook. The company has also announced partnerships with Facebook and Myspace.Coming in the wake of Buzz, Microsoft is being very careful to tout it’s concern for your privacy concerns, as well as take a very step-by-step approach to rolling out the new features. The LinkedIn plug-in works with Outlook 2010, 2007 and 2003. As opposed to Buzz, users have full control over whether or not to use the service. They not only have to opt-in, they need to download and install the beta version of Outlook, the social connector extension and the LinkedIn plug-in. By the time you’re finished, we couldn’t imagine you could have ended up there by accident. Even then, the social connector is a read-only service at the moment, meaning you cannot yet update your services from within Outlook. We’re sure that the ability to update from within Outlook will come, but as we said, Microsoft seems to be rolling out these features very carefully, so as not to have the same privacy concerns with its primarily enterprise user base.As for privacy, Microsoft had the following to say:Finally, its important to mention that with multiple professional and social networks available for the Outlook Social Connector, the design of the OSC is such that your privacy and permissions settings on each of the networks you use are represented and respected within this experience. For example, if your profile photo and job title are publicly listed on a given network, then OSC users will see your photo and job title when receiving an e-mail from you (if they use that same network). Similarly, if you choose to restrict profile access on a given network, the OSC will respect that privacy. The goal of the OSC is not to create another social network or set of privacy settings for you to manage, but rather to bring the networks you already value and use to the Outlook experience.While this means that users don’t have to worry about tweaking yet another layer of privacy settings, they need to be aware of the settings they already have in place, as the OSC will import and use information from the included social networks.For now, only the LinkedIn plug-in is available, and the only information on when Facebook and Myspace will be available is “later this year”. Microsoft did, however, offer a preview of what the new feature would look like. mike melanson Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Read More »

Crowdfunding Your Startup with MicroVentures

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#start#tips 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting audrey watters Crowdfunding has become a popular way to fund a variety of projects, from small-scale endeavors to large-scale, literally earth-shaping efforts.It’s still not the accepted or the obvious choice for funding your startup, however. But news that the Austin, Texas-based MicroVentures has successfully raised its first $150,000 for three startups via its crowdfunding platform suggests that these alternatives might be viable after all. MicroVentures is an online investment service that uses peer-to-peer fundraising. The service is meant to help investors from all over the country – both accredited investors and what the company calls “sophisticated investors” – gain access to deal that they wouldn’t ordinarily see. It also allows them to invest smaller amounts. MicroVentures isn’t disclosing a lot of details about the first three deals that it’s funded, but it says that these ranged from $2000 to $25,000 increments, with the average investment roughly $5000.MicroVentures does the due diligence for investors, running a variety of checks on financials, forecasts, use of funds, burn rate and so on. Everything is disclosed fully to potential investors, who make their investments in exchange for equity in the companies.MicroVentures says it makes the process of fundraising easier for entrepreneurs too. According to company CEO Bill Clark, “The lure of our site is that we do all the work while the entrepreneur can go back to building their product and gaining customers. It can take months to raise money and that means a lot of calls, follow-ups and paperwork. We have over 500 investors that have over $25 million in liquid net worth, and our process is automated online so we minimize all of the paperwork and handle most of the investor calls.”As this is an online process, it also helps open investments beyond a certain region.Typically, the sign-up process for startups costs $100, but those interested in trying MicroVenture can can submit their ideas for free using the code RWW.last_img read more

Read More »

Money Monday

first_imgA veteran qualifies for VGLI if he or she is a:service member being released from active duty who was covered by Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance (SGLI)service member separating, retiring, or being released from assignment in the Ready Reserve or National Guard who was covered by SGLINational Guard or Reserve member covered by part-time SGLI who incurred a disability or aggravated a pre-existing disability while performing inactive duty or traveling to or from dutymember of the Individual Ready Reserve or Inactive National GuardEvidence of good health is not needed for those veterans who submit their application:within 240 days after discharge for those discharged on or after November 1, 2012within 120 days after discharge for those discharged before November 1, 2012Those who apply after the no-health evidence period are required to answer questions about their health.For more information, refer to this page.Browse more military personal finance webinars and articles written and presented by experts.Follow Dr. O’Neill on Twitter!This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network Blog on December 2, 2013. By Barbara O’NeillAre Veterans eligible for government-provided life insurance?Yes. Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI) is a life insurance program that allows veterans to convert their full-time Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance (SGLI) coverage to lifetime renewable term insurance. Veterans can keep VGLI for as long as they pay the premiums. However, there is a time limit to convert from SGLI to VGLI. Eligibleveterans must apply to convert SGLI to VGLI within one year and 120 days from discharge.last_img read more

Read More »

Jay Baer on Hugging Your Haters and the Real Value of Stellar Customer Service – Episode 53

first_imgPodcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 42:17 — 38.8MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSS“For years, customer service has been a necessary evil.” That’s what Jay Baer says, but he’s convinced that even though it’s never been true, it’s especially not true in the digital age. Customer service is the lifeblood of truly impacting businesses. During this conversation Anthony asks the kind of questions that unpack the gold of Jay’s new book, “Hug Your Haters” and shows you why keeping customers through outstanding customer service is tons more important that getting new customers. After listening to this episode you won’t think of customer service the same way again.For generations, customer service has been seen a necessary evil ~ Jay BaerClick To TweetWhy Haters are not necessarily going to hate forever.You’ve heard the pithy little meme – “Hater’s gonna’ hate.” But is it always true? Jay Baer believes that most people who you might classify as a “hater” on social media these days are simply voicing their opinion about the reality of their experience with your company, and resigning yourself to a statement like that could also resign you to failure in business. In this episode Jay explains how companies NEED to respond to haters no matter what, and how they can do so in a way that is a win for the business in every case. It sounds like a lot to promises but Jay delivers, on this episode of In The Arena.Why you should fix your customer service before you get more customers.If it sounds backwards to you that you should fix your customer service before getting more customers, that’s because you fall squarely into what current statistics reveal: that most businesses spend far more on marketing and sales than they do on customer service. Jay Baer believes that’s a colossal mistake because it’s much easier and wiser to keep the customers you’ve already reeled in, then it is to go out and get new customers. And by keeping them happy AS your customers, they are going to have a huge impact on whether or not you get those new customers you want so badly. It’s more to unpack that one paragraph can do, so be sure you listen to Jay’s explanation on this episode.If it’s out there on the internet, and you don’t respond, it’s true by default ~ Jay BaerClick To TweetWhich channel should you use for customer service?There are so many ways for you to communicate with your customers and for them to communicate with you – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. – which one should you use to address customer service issues? Jay Baer believes that the answer is obvious: Use the ones your customers prefer to use, which will not be the same for every customer. This idea comes from Jay’s explanation of “on stage” and “off stage” complaints and how each of them has to be handled in different ways in order to magnify the value your business places on the customer. If you don’t understand, you will – and you’ll agree entirely – if you listen to this episode of In The Arena.What happens when you respond to customer complaints?Do you really know? Jay Baer says that more happens than just averting a disaster or fixing a problem. The research he did while writing his new book, “Hug Your Haters” revealed that in EVERY CASE responding to customer complaints resulted in a huge uptick in customer satisfaction (which you would expect) and ALSO a huge increase in customer advocacy (which you may not have expected). So when you respond to your customer’s complaints promptly, with care, and with an eye to solve their problem to their satisfaction, you not only make a friend, you make an ally. Find out more of what Jay has discovered about stellar customer service, on this episode.If you answer a complaint, it increases customer advocacy. Every. Time. ~ Jay BaerClick To TweetOutline of this great episode Anthony’s introduction to Jay Baer and the conversation in this episode. Why Jay stopped doing his “Jay Today” show (and how Anthony felt about it). Jay’s definition of “a hater” (from his book “Hug Your Haters”). How Jay proved in his book that customer service is not happening well overall. The gap between what the company believes their customer experience is like, and what it really is. Why companies ignore customer complaints. Why you should fix your customer service before you get more customers. Where is the proper customer service channel (to your customers)? What are “off-stage” haters and “on stage” haters – and why they matter. The risk for business that don’t respond to “on stage” haters. Business improvements for those who respond to their customer complaints. The “high care” and “low care” approaches to business. What is the downstream impact of your customer service choices? What Jay is reading right now. The most important book Jay has ever read. The person who’s had the biggest influence on Jay. The most important lesson Jay has ever learned. If Jay wasn’t doing what he does, what would he be doing? What Jay wants to be remembered for.Our Sponsors:Jeffrey Gitomer Sales Gold – use the code “Anthony” to receive your discount.Sales Gravy University – tell Jeb that Anthony sent you.Resources & Links mentioned in this episodeJay’s websites: www.JayBaer.com and www.ConvinceAndConvert.com110198067200624003630399170626The theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarino Tweets you can use to share this episodeThe balance of power has changed. Customers can now tell others how terrible you are ~ Jay BaerClick To TweetHug Your Haters with Jay Baer, on this episode of In The Arena with Anthony IannarinoClick To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address below Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Read More »

ICC to take stern action against guilty players: Pawar

first_imgThe ICC today made it clear that it would not tolerate corruption in cricket and warned of stern action against players found guilty in the spot-fixing scandal which has rocked world cricket.ICC President Sharad Pawar also said that Scotland Yard’s investigations into the spot-fixing charges against Pakistani cricketers will not take long and there was “nothing to hide” on this issue.”Till Scotland Yard probe is not over how can we comment on that? But if anything established we will take strong stand. Without information we should not jump into any conclusion,” Pawar told reporters after meeting with PCB Chairman Ijaz Butt at his residence.”Prima facie there are some allegations and we have suspended the players on the basis of that. Scotland Yard has permitted them to go back to Pakistan and PCB has also promised to make them available to the investigators if required. Nobody is playing hide and seek A major investigation agency is carrying out the probe and that will not take long. PCB or ICC will not interfere in the process,” he added.Pawar rubbished any conspiracy theory involving India. “India has no role in the entire drama,” he said.Butt also said that he did not believe in any conspiracy theory. “I don’t believe in any conspiracy theory. I am a businessman and a cricket administrator.”Pawar said that all the countries are supporting the ICC in preserving the sanctity of the game.”PCB is not a separate entity, it is also a part of the ICC. ICC takes collective decision and we will not tolerate any nonsense or corruption. All the boards are supporting us in preserving the sanctity of the game,” Pawar said.advertisementButt claimed that the PCB was not offended with the ICC’s move to provisionally suspend the three cricketers – captain Salman Butt and pacer duo of Muhammad Aamir and Muhammad Asif.”We are not offended for the decision. ICC asked them to individually answer and all of them have done so. If anyone is found guilty, we will not show any tolerance. ICC Code of Conduct is very clear regarding this matter,” he said.”We have talked about the three players, the Scotland Yard is investigating the matter. Till investigation is complete, neither we are commenting nor the ICC is commenting,” Butt added.last_img read more

Read More »

Coach Mark Sangiao vows Team Lakay will be back ‘stronger, better’ after rough start in 2019

first_imgOverall, Team Lakay’s record in ONE Championship in the first month of the year is 1-4 with flyweight contender Danny Kingad the only one to win his fight in January.Mark Sangiao, the patriarch and head coach of Team Lakay, knew that his team will recover and that they’ve faced tougher struggles before especially during the dark days of 2017 when they went 0-4 in their last four fights.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“Of course, we’ll do our best,” said Sangiao in the post-fight press conference of ONE: Hero’s Ascent Friday at Mall of Asia Arena. “We’ll go back to the drawing board, train harder, we’ll go back to our room and try to see what’s lacking and we’ll be back stronger and better.”Team Lakay, though, is still one of the top stables in ONE Championship with Kevin Belingon and Eduard Folayang still the reigning champions in the bantamweight and lightweight divisions, respectively. Gabe Norwood lifts Rain or Shine over Ginebra Sangiao acknowledged that there will be struggles along the way especially with how they performed in 2018 capturing World titles in every weight division his fighters fought in.“We’re back to the drawing board, we’ll talk about what went wrong, and bring out things that needs to be said because that’s how we work as a team,” said Sangiao.“We always help each other and we really help one another. We’re open to whatever needs to be said because we have to discuss everything so we can improve our skills even more.”ADVERTISEMENT Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Team Lakay’s start to 2019 is off to a rocky path after the famed stable from Baguio City lost two of the four world titles it won back in 2018.The first champion to fall was Joshua Pacio when he lost his ONE World strawweight title via unanimous decision to Yosuke Saruta on Jan. 19 and exactly seven days later it was Geje Eustaquio losing his ONE World flyweight strap to rival Adriano Moraes.ADVERTISEMENT US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostingcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Team Lakay’s rough start lights a fire under Danny Kingad PLAY LIST 01:04Team Lakay’s rough start lights a fire under Danny Kingad00:52ONE CEO believes Joshua Pacio won the fight00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte View comments Oil plant explodes in Pampanga townlast_img read more

Read More »