Russia turns back German journalist who wanted to probe human rights in Chechnya

first_img “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says May 27, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Belarus RSF_en Organisation Reporters Without Borders today protested against Russia’s expulsion of a prominent German writer and freelance investigative journalist, Günter Wallraff, who had gone to prepare an article on human rights in Chechnya. Wallraff and two German companions were turned back on their arrival at Moscow airport on 7 January.”By preventing journalists from going to Chechnya to do their work, the Russian authorities have again showed that they have something to hide there,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard said in a letter to Russian foreign minister Igor Ivanov. “We denounce this censorship and demand that journalists be able to cover the war in Chechnya without having to submit to every kind of administrative obstacle,” Ménard said, calling for Wallraff to allowed to work freely in Russia.Wallraff became famous in the 1980s for having posed as a Turkish worker in Germany, an experience on which he based a book and a film. The two fellow-Germans who accompanied him to Moscow were Norbert Bluem, a former Christian Democrat labour minister, and Rupert Neudeck, the head of the relief organisation Cap Anamur. Wallraff was to have met in Moscow with the leader of the Kremlin-appointed Chechen administration, Akhmad Kadyrov, before going to Ingushetia to investigate the situation of Chechen refugees. He had also intended to try to enter Chechnya.On his arrival in Moscow, Wallraff was taken to a foreign ministry representative at the airport, who cancelled his tourist visa. He was then sent back to Germany on the same plane without being allowed to contact the German embassy in Moscow. The Russian foreign ministry said it had concluded from an interview with Wallraff published by Stern magazine on 2 January that he planned to find evidence of human rights violations in Chechnya and then launch “a new campaign against Russia in the German news media.”Wallraff told Reporters Without Borders that he made the mistake of publishing several articles before he left in which he criticised the Russian authorities and announced his intention of investigating the human rights and humanitarian situation in Chechnya although he was going to Russia on just a tourist visa. He said: “Journalists are more and more often forced to used unofficial and indirect means to investigate human rights abuses. The Russian authorities are very good at hiding information about violations and know how to ensure that only their viewpoint gets out in the news media. So it is harder and harder for human rights activists to make themselves heard.”The obstacles to free information about the war in Chechnya became official on 1 October 1999 when journalists were banned from travelling freely in the region. Since June 2001, accredited journalists are not allowed to move about within Chechnya without an interior ministry escort. A ministerial decision further reduced the possibilities of war coverage in Chechnya in October 2002 by specifying territories, organisations and institutions, including “zones where antiterrorist operations are under way,” to which foreigners are denied access unless they have special permission. The directive did not however say how such a permission to enter Chechen territory could be obtained or how long it would be valid.Journalists with Russia’s state-owned media are obliged to adapt to the blackout imposed by the army, while the independent news media and foreign journalists in practice no longer have access to Chechnya. Anna Politkovskaya, a journalist with the daily Novaya Gazeta, was arrested by the Russian military in the Shatoy region in the south of Chechnya in February for “violating the regulations in force for journalists.” She succeeded in escaping after she had been escorted to the local military base from where she was to have been expelled.Russian soldiers seized the accreditation and equipment of journalists working for the state-owned television stations ORT and TV Tsenter in August on the grounds that they were not accompanied by a Russian army representative while questioning Chechens fleeing a village where Russian troops were carrying out a “mopping-up operation.” In November, Russian security forces confiscated the footage which Hans Wilhelm Steinfeld, the Moscow correspondent of the Norwegian public television station NRK, had just shot of Chechen refugees.The Russian authorities pursue a policy aimed at co-opting the news media and restricting press freedom. This was particular evident when Chechen rebels took 700 persons hostage in a Moscow theatre from 23 to 26 October. Several news media, both Russian and foreign, were heavily criticised for their coverage and the Duma passed an antiterrorist law that would have allowed the authorities to prosecute any journalist covering subjects linked to terrorism and the war in Chechnya. President Putin vetoed the bill at the last moment.In a 13 November letter to Fritz Pleitgen, chairman of the German state-owned TV network ARD, the Russian authorities said they had found the German news media coverage of the hostage-taking to have been “shocking, utterly intolerable and deplorable for a public institution,” and questioned their future cooperation with ARD. BelarusEurope – Central Asia News Help by sharing this information January 9, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Russia turns back German journalist who wanted to probe human rights in Chechnya BelarusEurope – Central Asia center_img News News June 2, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” May 28, 2021 Find out more to go furtherlast_img read more

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Professors present project to build lunar structures

first_imgFour USC professors are working on a project that could potentially help build structures on the moon.Berok Khoshnevis, professor of industrial and systems engineering and the project’s principal investigator, will present the proposal today at a conference in Washington, D.C.Far out · The Contour Crafting Simulation Plan for Lunar Settlement Infrastructure Build-Up is a collaboration between engineering and architecture professors. – Rendering courtesy of Behnaz Farahi and Connor WingfieldNASA chose to fund this project, along with 29 others, in August from a pool of nearly 800 proposals. Each proposal receives approximately $100,000 for one to develop feasible structures, according to a NASA press release.Khoshnevis; Anders Carlson, an assistant professor of architecture and director of the Master of Building Science Program; Neil Leach, a visiting professor in the school of architecture; and Madhu Thangavelu, a professor of astronautics in the Viterbi School of Engineering and lecturer in the school of architecture, will lead the project.The project takes Khoshnevis’ Contour Crafting device, a 3-D printer that uses cement to build structures layer by layer, and converts the structure for use on the moon.Khoshnevis began work on his Contour Crafting device in 2000, and it was named one of the top 25 inventions by the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2006.The team is currently working on a prototype of the Contour Crafting Simulation Plan for Lunar Settlement Infrastructure Build-Up. Right now, the team is developing a nozzle system that would heat lunar soil into a consistent paste that could be used like cement in the terrestrial Contour Crafting device.“NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is an expert in processing lunar material. They make the lunar simulant material we use for testing. It has the same composition of the soil on the moon,” Khoshnevis said. “We have gotten some of this material, so we are melting this material at USC and trying it out at contour crafting and building smaller structures.”Khoshnevis said the next step is “actually building something useful.” The team will go to NASA’s testing facility in Arizona, Desert Research and Technology Studies, or D-RATS, after it develops the machinery.“We’ll take it to Arizona and use the soil there and, using the sun power and the build structure, do what is supposed to happen on the moon and give the first try on earth at the D-RATS site,” Khoshnevis said.Khoshnevis said scientists are very familiar with the conditions of different soils on the moon as a result of NASA’s previous research, and the sand in Arizona is similar to the kind found on the moon.The Lunar Contour Crafting device would be used to build basic infrastructure, such as landing pads, aprons to guard against debris from landings, hangars and shields to create shade. The self-assembling device would use solar energy.“The electrical energy that we create can drive different machinery as well as a heater that melts the lunar heater,” Khoshnevis said. “Then it extrudes the molten material, which is like lava, out of a nozzle that is contour-crafting. On a layer-by-layer basis it builds these different structures.”The device will use sulfur-based material, but because the melting point of sulfur is close to the higher temperatures reached on the moon, shields made of ceramic materials, which have a lower melting point, will be used to create shade.Once such an infrastructure is in place, Khoshnevis said, habitable structures could be a travel destination for space tourists. Communication devices could be put on the moon, a more stable environment than in orbit where they are hit with space debris, and a telescope on the moon would give researchers a clearer view of the universe because the moon has no atmosphere.Building structures on the moon would also provide a way for testing the possibilities of going to other planets.“Whatever you want to try on Mars or other planets would be easier to test on the moon first,” Khoshnevis said. “It only takes three days to get there.”Though Khoshnevis said building permanent structures on the moon might not happen in his lifetime, it could happen during the lifetimes of current students.“The human is a brand new species,” Khoshnevis said. “While some people think everything that could be invented [has] already been invented, I believe that we are just at the beginning and that we haven’t scratched the surface of what we can do. It’s a good feeling to be on the front lines of those discoveries.”last_img read more

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Rafael Nadal criticises Wimbledon’s 25-second shot clock plan

first_imgWorld number one Rafael Nadal took a swipe at plans to introduce a shot clock at Wimbledon next year after speedily moving past Israels Dudi Sela in the first round.The U.S. Open is set to introduce a shot clock this year so that the 25 seconds allowed between points is strictly enforced and Wimbledon is likely to follow suit.Nadal, who has often fallen foul of the slow-play rule during his career, said he could not support the move.”I’m 32. I dont know for how long Im going to play. Hopefully for a long time. But is something that is not bothering me,” the Spaniard said when asked for his opinion in his news conference after a 6-3, 6-2, 6-2 win on Tuesday which took less than two hours on Centre Court.Also read – Wimbledon: Thiem, Goffin depart while Nadal, Djokovic advance”In terms of the sport, depends. If you want to see a quick game without thinking, well done.””If you want to keep playing in a sport that you need to think, you need to play with more tactics, you want to have long and good rallies, then of course you are going the wrong way.””But seems like sometimes is only about the business, so… I cant support this, no. Because I dont feel the matches that stay for the history of our sport went that quick.”Also Read – Wimbledon: Halep, defending champion Muguruza advance, Kvitova outNadal pointed to his epic four hour 48 minute Wimbledon final against Roger Federer in 2008 a match widely considered the best final ever played at the All England Club.advertisementHe said speeding up tennis could water down the drama, although in fact Grand Slams now allow 25 seconds between points rather than the 20 seconds of 10 years ago.”I don’t remember an emotional match that the total time of the match has been two hours,” Nadal said.”All the matches that have been important in the history of our sport have been four hours, five hours.””To play these kind of matches you need time between points because you cannot play points in a row with long rallies, with emotional points, having only 25 seconds between points.”last_img read more

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10 People In Sports Media Who Lost Their Jobs For Controversial Comments

first_imgProvocateurs have proven to be very valuable in the current sports media landscape. Years ago, ESPN caught lightning in a bottle with shows like Pardon The Interruption and Around the Horn, the new next step in that direction, First Take, is basically the model for how rival FOX Sports 1, which is hiring away longtime co-host Skip Bayless, is building its daily programming. A show like First Take relies on big news-making declarations, and opinions that will get people riled up. Sometimes, on live television or a fast-paced medium like Twitter, personalities cross the line, and are punished.The most recent example is Emily Austen, a Tampa Bay Rays and Orlando Magic sideline reporter for FOX Sports Florida who will no longer be appearing on the network due to racist statements she made on a Barstool Sports Facebook Live show. She is far from the only sports personality to be given the axe for things they’ve said.In 2016, I made a bad decision and my life took an unexpected turn. Now, I’m passionate about helping others avoid making a similar mistake. pic.twitter.com/BlRsOAZFYR— Emily Austen (@emilyausten_) March 14, 2017Here are 10 of the most notorious examples of people in sports media who have been fired for the things they’ve said.Next: Get Started With Emily Austen >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11last_img read more

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Energy regulator orders Hydro One to cut administrative budget by 30 million

first_imgTORONTO – Ontario’s electricity customers shouldn’t foot the bill for “unreasonably high” compensation for Hydro One’s senior staff, the province’s energy regulator said as it ordered the company to cut its administrative budget by $30 million over two years.In a recent ruling, the Ontario Energy Board rejected a Hydro One request to increase its administrative costs and spend more on capital projects. The OEB decision comes as part of a review of a 2016 rate hike request from Hydro One which, if approved, would see rates jump by 0.5 per cent in 2017 and 4.8 per cent in 2018. The regulator will set the rates later this fall.Hydro One said in a statement that it will review the OEB orders and “determine appropriate next steps”.Natalie Poole-Moffatt, the company’s vice-president of corporate affairs, defended the utility’s management team.“Hydro One recruited a leadership team with the necessary experience to deliver on the promises we made to our customers: improve customer service and increase productivity while maintaining reliability,” she said in a statement.In 2015, the government announced it would sell 60 per cent of Hydro One to raise billions it would put towards infrastructure projects.In the decision, the OEB said hydro customers gain little from the jump in executive salaries that were largely generated by the IPO. The total corporate management costs for Hydro One in 2014 of about $5.5 million are set to increase to $22.1 million in 2018, the regulator said.“The OEB shares the concerns of … (those) who question whether Hydro One has adequately demonstrated that the significant increases in compensation costs associated with the parent company’s transformation will produce outcomes that utility customers value,” the OEB decision said.It also expressed concern that Hydro One has stopped making progress toward bringing executive compensation levels down to the market median and those efforts have “now reversed.” The regulator also said the company’s total compensation amounts are likely understated because not all items of Hydro One compensation were included in its rate hike request.“After considering all of the evidence related to the amounts for compensation that Hydro One seeks to recover from transmission services ratepayers, the OEB finds that compensation amounts in the total (administrative budget) for 2017 and 2018 of $412.7 million and $409.3 million are unreasonably high by an amount of approximately $15 million in each year,” the decision said.The OEB also rejected a proposal to give all of the tax savings generated by the 2015 IPO of the partially privatized company to shareholders. The regulator instead mandated shareholders receive 71 per cent of the savings while ratepayers receive the remaining 29 per cent.That would drop Hydro One’s shareholders portion of tax savings from $81.9 million to $58.1 in 2017 and from $89.6 million to $63.6 million in 2018.The OEB also ordered Hydro One to reduce its budget for capital expenditures by $126.1 million in 2017 and $122.2 million in 2018.A spokesman for Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault said Tuesday that the government’s plan to cut hydro bills by 25 per cent will not be impacted by any rate application approved by the OEB. Colin Nekolaichuk said the OEB rate application process has resulted in $278 million in reduced administrative and capital costs.“This is yet another example of the OEB’s strong record of denying hydro companies all that they ask for, and reviewing rate applications with the consumer in mind first,” he said in a statement.But NDP energy critic Peter Tabuns said the OEB didn’t go far enough to limit executive compensation or give ratepayers a bigger piece of future tax savings.“Legally, they could have assigned 100 per cent of (the tax savings) to customers,” Tabuns said. “There are billions of dollars that are now going to shareholders that could have kept bills down.”Progressive Conservative energy critic Todd Smith said the OEB decision shows that Hydro One’s executive compensation is out of line with other jurisdictions. Smith noted that the OEB report also provides an increasingly rare look into the financial status of Hydro One, which was removed from the purview of several legislative watchdogs after the IPO.“It takes an OEB report to actually see now what executive compensation has grown to at Hydro One,” he said. “No longer are the executives and the total cost to ratepayers known because only the top five executives are required … to declare what their compensation is.”last_img read more

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Gildan Activewear says Q1 profit drops 19 per cent on weaker sock

first_imgMONTREAL – Apparel manufacturer Gildan Activewear Inc. says its net earnings fell nearly 19 per cent in the first quarter compared to its record performance a year ago.The maker of socks, underwear and T-Shirts says it earned US$67.9 million in the period ended April 1, compared with US$83.5 million in the prior same quarter the previous year.That equalled 31 cents per diluted share, down five cents from a year ago.Excluding one-time restructuring and acquisition costs, Gildan earned US$74.6 million or 34 cents per share in adjusted profits. That’s down from US$90.1 million or 39 cents per share in the first quarter of 2017.Sales were US$647.3 million, down 2.7 per cent from US$665.4 million. That’s despite a 3.2 per cent increase in activewear sales due to price increases.Hosiery and underwear sales, meanwhile, were down 20 per cent as Walmart, Target and other large retailers are shifting to more house brand apparel with low prices.Gildan says the results were in largely in line with its expectations and reaffirmed its guidance for 2018.The Montreal-based company says international sales grew 24 per cent in the quarter.It also launched its full assortment of Gildan-branded men’s underwear on Amazon.The company says results were impacted by higher raw material and other costs, along with investments in e-commerce and distribution.Companies in this story: (TSX:GIL)last_img read more

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HP Heat wave intensifies

first_imgShimla: The heat wave has intensified in the plains and the lower hilly areas of Himachal Pradesh, the Meteorological Department said on Sunday. Una recorded the highest temperature in the state at 32.8 degrees Celsius, the MeT Centre, Shimla, said. The maximum temperature in Bilaspur was 31 degrees Celsius, followed by Hamirpur 30.6 degrees Celsius, Kangra 30.4 degrees Celsius, Sundernagar 30.1 degrees Celsius, Mandi 29.7 degrees Celsius and Chamba 28.2 degrees Celsius. The maximum temperature in both Shimla and Manali was 23 degrees Celsius, whereas it was 14.8 degrees Celsius in Dalhousie. The lowest temperature in the state was recorded in tribal district Lahaul and Spiti’s administrative centre Keylong at 2.1 degrees Celsius, it added.last_img read more

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For unlawfully setting off Diwali fireworks Singapore PIO jailed

first_imgSingapore: An Indian-origin man in Singapore has been jailed for three weeks and fined 5,000 dollars for setting off fireworks close to a housing complex during Diwali celebrations in the country last year. Jeevan Arjoon, 29, bought the firecrackers from Little India shopping precinct and unlawfully lit them at 3.30 AM as Diwali night stunt on November 6, 2018, The New Paper reported on Friday. The fireworks, shot up to seven-storey, were laud enough to be heard from the neighbouring public housing estate of Yishun. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USThe display lasted for five minutes. No one was hurt and there was no damage to any property, according to the report. District Judge Marvin Bay said the court has to take a strict view of Jeevan’s use and possession of fireworks, and sentenced him to three weeks’ jail and 5,000 Singapore dollars (USD 3,685) on Thursday. He said the detonation of fireworks can cause serious injuries and pose a risk of fire, noting that they were set off close to public housing. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsThe judge said that setting off fireworks at 3 AM could also cause considerable alarm to the public, particularly in this time of heightened concerns over possible acts of terrorism. Jeevan, who was unrepresented, said in his mitigation that he was the sole breadwinner of his family and was taking care of his mother-in-law who was diabetic and blind. The man, who had a record of giving false information to a public servant in 2017, was also convicted of giving false information to a police officer during investigation into the firework incident. He had tried to put the blame on someone else.last_img read more

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The Amazing Longevity Of Jaromir Jagr

It’s not often that a player is still a desired commodity days after his 43rd birthday, but that’s precisely what Jaromir Jagr, who was traded from the New Jersey Devils to the Florida Panthers on Thursday, appears to be.Despite recent frustrations over his playing time with New Jersey, Jagr could prove to be a useful short-term rental for the Panthers. He retains the same soft hands and keen vision that made him a five-time scoring champion. And like so many of hockey’s greatest offensive talents before him, Jagr has a knack for skating where the action is headed before it arrives. His trademark strength seems scarcely to have waned with time; he still has moments when he’s nearly impossible to knock off the puck along the boards.Jagr is by no means the player he once was. But it’s improbable enough that he is still a player at all, still part of the league more than 24 years after his NHL debut. He had been 81 days older than the league’s second-oldest active player — St. Louis Blues goaltender Martin Brodeur — but then Brodeur up and retired last month. Now, no current player was born within 25 months of Jagr.Of course, more than perhaps any major sports league, the NHL has had a place for ancient players. Three and a half decades ago, Gordie Howe — then the NHL’s all-time scoring leader — famously skated through a full 80-game schedule that concluded a week after his 52nd birthday. More recently, Chris Chelios was still manning an NHL blueline at age 48. And just last season, Teemu Selanne played at an age seven months older than Jagr is now. So it’s not quite unprecedented for Jagr to still be around at age 43 — and counting.But Jagr’s past few years have surpassed what just about any other NHL player has ever done in his dotage. Despite posting the leanest traditional numbers of his long career this year (more on that later), Jagr is1As of late last week. in the midst of the seventh-best adjusted point shares above replacement (PSAR)2A modification of the Hockey-Reference.com metric that assigns goaltending worth according to Tom Tango’s wins above replacement and re-allocates the remaining value such that forwards receive 60 percent of league PSAR in a given season, defensemen get 30 percent and goaltenders receive 10 percent. season by any skater aged 43 or older3As of March 1 of the season in question. since the NHL’s Original Six era began in 1942-43. What’s more, he was better last year: No non-goalie aged 42 or older has ever had more PSAR in a season than Jagr’s 6.9 in 2013-14.Plus, there’s a strong case to be made that the conventional stats — and the next-level metrics based off of them, such as PSAR — have undersold Jagr’s contributions to the Devils, particularly this season.As marvelous as they are for a player his age, Jagr’s basic numbers this year haven’t been eye-popping by the standards of other forwards logging as much ice time. In 53 games, he’s notched a modest 11 goals and 18 assists to go with a -10 plus-minus rating. (As a point of comparison, if Jagr had played to his career per-game averages, he’d already have 25 goals and 37 assists by now!) According to PSAR, which synthesizes box-score stats into a single-number representation of value, it’s been his worst season ever — and by no small margin. The 18-year-old rookie version of Jagr had 3.1 PSAR in 1990-91, after which he wouldn’t put up fewer than 4.9 PSAR in a single season again — until this year.Hockey’s recent statistical revolution, however, has brought with it more sophisticated ways to gauge a player’s contribution to his team. Its biggest lesson? That although goals and assists are great, there’s also a big advantage in simply helping your team keep possession of the puck.And as it so happens, Jagr is still one of the best players in the league at that.Over the past two seasons, Jagr’s Devils haven’t been an especially strong hockey club. They rank 24th in both point percentage4In the wacky world of the NHL’s standings, some measure of sanity can still be salvaged by dividing a team’s standings points by the total number of points handed out in its games. So, for instance, the winner of a regulation game would earn 2 out of 2 total points; meanwhile, the winner of a shootout would get 2 out of the 3 total points awarded, since the loser would also get 1 point. Among other things, this has the advantage of preserving a .500 record as the mark of an average team. and goal differential during that span, and while the team has undeniably been plagued by poor shooting and save percentage luck, they’ve also posted relatively unimpressive possession rates — except when Jagr is on the ice. With Jagr, New Jersey plays like one of the premier possession teams in hockey5The Devils’ zone start-adjusted 5-on-5 Fenwick percentage with Jagr on the ice would rank third in the NHL over the past two seasons.; without him, they play like one of the worst.Studying Jagr’s game, it’s not hard to see why this is the case. Although his stride — never the fastest even in his prime — is noticeably sluggish these days, he makes up for it with sheer hockey sense, constantly scanning the ice for passing opportunities or chances to extend possession by corralling loose pucks. Perhaps more importantly, he remains the master of shielding the puck with his 6-foot-3-inch, 240-pound frame, creating scoring chances for himself and others by cycling possession deep within the offensive zone.“I know … my strength,” Jagr recently told NHL.com’s Dan Rosen. “I like to play [in the] offensive zone on the boards. I still feel like I’m strong enough to beat anybody, [or] at least hold that puck. … Maybe I’m not going to beat that guy one-on-one like I used to, but I can still make a play from that corner from the cycle. That’s my strength. And in the playoffs, that’s the way you play.”This is why, with the NHL’s trade deadline approaching, Jagr was mentioned as a legitimate option for contending teams looking to upgrade their offense — particularly with the man advantage — before the playoffs begin. Ironically, it seems that as the league increases its emphasis on possession, Jagr’s value has only been heightened even as his goals and assists have receded with age. And for Florida, barely clinging to the hope of a playoff berth but with clear upgrades to be had on the power play and in advanced metrics, Jagr might be a good fit.On the other hand, what does it say about the state of the NHL in 2015 that a plodding 43-year-old future Hall of Famer could change a team’s postseason chances?Like many things in hockey, it’s a question that leads back to Howe. In the foreword to Howe’s (excellent) new autobiography, the great defenseman Bobby Orr marveled at Howe’s longevity: “Today, if a player cracks the top five in scoring in the NHL, he’s considered a star. Do it a couple of years in a row and you’re a superstar. … Well, Gordie Howe did it twenty years in a row. That’s right — twenty. How do you begin to do justice to a legacy like that?”It was undoubtedly an impressive run for Howe, but — counterintuitively — the ability of a man in his 40s (and even 50s) to still dominate a professional sports league might speak as much about the quality of play around him as to his own athletic gifts.In 1968-69 — the final year of the streak to which Orr referred — a 40-year-old Howe was nearly the best player in hockey, finishing second only to 26-year-old Phil Esposito in PSAR. And in his final season more than a decade later, Howe was serviceable enough to be a regular contributor. But the NHL of that era also underwent an enormous amount of upheaval between expansion, the emergence of a rival league (the World Hockey Association), and the influx of new talent (and a fresh playing style) from Europe.In some ways, the chaos of the 1960s and ’70s provided the perfect cover for an aging megastar such as Howe to keep his career rolling. We can see this in the percentage of total NHL PSAR going to various cohorts of skaters, grouped by age, over time:The 1960s saw the NHL’s first expansion since the Great Depression — marking the end of the Original Six era — and they also coincided with a major uptick in the production of older players, one that would not fully abate until the early 1980s. In addition to Howe, players such as Alex Delvecchio, John Bucyk, Jean Beliveau, Frank Mahovlich and Jean Ratelle all produced great seasons in their late 30s (and beyond).The present day also appears to be a haven for the comparatively superannuated. Starting in the early to mid-1990s, the fraction of league value produced by the oldest batch of NHL players swelled to levels not seen since the 1970s. While that proportion has decreased a bit today relative to its peak in the immediate aftermath of the NHL’s lost 2004-05 season, it remains higher now than at any point between 1974 and 1996.So Jagr’s longevity, impressive as it is, might also be a symptom of ongoing weaknesses in the state of pro hockey itself. Is it mere coincidence that the uptick began right when the NHL’s aggressive expansion plans of the 1990s were fully realized? Or that it lasted through the so-called Dead Puck Era and well into the post-lockout “New NHL“? It’s not clear.But regardless of where Jagr sits in the intersection between the NHL’s health and the twilight of his once-immense (and still formidable) skills, he remains a player to which attention is owed. The Panthers are picking up more than a living legend playing out the final act of his career — they’re nabbing a player who still offers many of the little advantages that could make a difference along the journey to the Stanley Cup. read more

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Mens soccer plays to scoreless draw with Northwestern

Junior forward Kenny Cunningham (17) fires a shot in a game against Northwestern Oct. 20 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. The two teams tied, 0-0. Credit: Eric Seger / Sport editorThree of the last four matches for the Ohio State men’s soccer team (2-6-5, 0-2-2) have been against ranked opponents, and after a scoreless draw with the No. 16 Northwestern Wildcats, all three resulted in ties.OSU played to a 0-0 tie with then-No. 17 Louisville Oct. 2, and tied then-No. 18 Michigan State 1-1 Oct. 13.Buckeye redshirt-junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov recorded seven saves in Sunday’s match and earned his fifth shutout of the season. He is now tied with Penn State keeper Andrew Wolverton for third place in the Big Ten Conference for shutouts.Ivanov said the shutout was a good confidence booster moving into the last four games of the regular season.“Trying to keep the team in the game at all times is my job,” he said. “It’s good when we get a clean sheet for the defense, we’ll just have to keep moving forward and building on it.”Ivanov now has 80 saves in 12 games, keeping him in first place in the conference.Both teams were successful in creating scoring opportunities throughout the match, but neither was able to capitalize or find a way to get the ball in the net. The Wildcats outshot the Buckeyes by a total of 20-14 and led the OSU in corner kicks, 7-5.Despite the tie, Buckeye coach John Bluem said the team will walk away feeling like this game was a loss because it played well and had a lot of scoring opportunities throughout the game.“You just keep waiting for (a shot) to go in, somehow, for us and we felt like we deserved to win a game like this because we’ve been in so many of them, and it’s been kind of a rough stretch,” he said. “The guys’ attitudes are great and we are grinding away at it. If we can find a way to produce some goals we might make something happen this year.”Missed opportunities have been a continued trend this year for the Buckeyes. The trend continued on OSU’s second attempt of the second overtime when sophomore midfielder Zach Mason blasted a shot wide of the goal from outside the box with just more than five minutes left in play.Mason said after the game that despite the missed opportunities, the results of the last few games proves to the team that it can compete with anybody.“We’ve known (we can compete) all along, but these are results that are showing it on paper, so I think this is only going to boost our confidence and maybe get some wins in the next few games,” he said. “I think we will try and push each other in training and try and have some fun with it too. It can’t all be serious because it’s a game and we want to enjoy it. I think the last two games have shown that we’ve kept our spirits up and are still fighting to the end.”The Buckeyes have a break from in-conference action as they prepare to take on Oakland Wednesday and Cleveland State Sunday, before finishing off the season with games against Penn State and Wisconsin. read more

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