Occupational health research round-up: April 2018

first_img Previous Article Next Article A history of paternal heart disease can increase shift work risk, research has concluded Paternal heart disease increases shift work riskPaternal mortality from myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death interacts with shift work to increase the risk of cardiac problems in men, according to this case-control analysis. When both shiftwork and parental mortality are present, the risk of myocardial infarction in men increases 2.39-fold, the study suggests.Hermansson J et al. “Shift work, parental cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction in males”. Occupational Medicine, published online 10 February, 2018Carbon monoxide risk in wood pellet storeroomsCarbon monoxide is the leading cause of mortality from unintentional poisoning in Slovenia, according to a study in the journal Occupational Medicine. The research concluded that carbon monoxide levels can often rise in wood pellet storerooms because of chemical degradation of pellets, even at room temperature. The research was prompted by paramedics and firefighters being called to help an unconscious man in a wood pellet storeroom. Victims were evacuated and the paramedics began cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Soon after, rescuers complained of dizziness and developed headache, nausea and fatigue, and a carbon monoxide level of 600 ppm was detected. Three rescuers were treated with 100% oxygen. Blood carboxyhaemoglobin levels were up to 8% on arrival at the emergency department. The victim died and autopsy confirmed carbon monoxide poisoning.First responders therefore need to be aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide in wood pellet storerooms. Basic precautions and safety instructions should be followed before entering a wood pellet storeroom, they advised. Carbon monoxide should be measured before entering and self-contained breathing apparatus should be used. Wood pellet storerooms require continuous ventilation and should be equipped with carbon monoxide detectors.Golob N et al. “Carbon monoxide poisoning in wood pellet storerooms.” Occupational Medicine, published online 17 February, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqy023Scottish workplace scheme aids rehabilitationA Scottish scheme to support the health of employees in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is aiding effective rehabilitation, according to an evaluation. Working Health Services Scotland (WHSS) supports the self-employed and workers in SMEs with a health condition who are absent, or at risk of being absent, return to work, according to a four-year evaluation of 13,463 referrals to the scheme.It found that more than three-quarters of those using the scheme had a musculoskeletal condition and 12% were referred with mental health conditions. Almost a fifth of those referred (18%) were off sick at the point of referral but back at work at discharge from the scheme. The actual number of days off sick amongst those taking part in the WHSS scheme varied according to age, length of absence prior to starting the programme, the primary health condition and time in the scheme. All health measures used in the evaluation showed significant improvements from entry in WHSS to discharge. Improvements in general health were sustained at the three and six-month follow-up points.Demou E et al. “Working Health Services Scotland: a 4-year evaluation”. Occupational Medicine, published online 30 January, 2018.Social class key in sickness absence due to MSDsSocial class plays an important part in determining recovery and return-to-work following time off because of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), according to this Finnish study. Within the studied MSD cases, the most common causes of absence were back pain and shoulder disorders. Osteoarthritis, disc disorders and rheumatoid arthritis induced the longest episodes of absence.Clear differences in absence, both in terms of the number of spells and duration, were found in relation to social class for all causes of MSDs. The largest class-related differences in terms of the number of spells of absence were observed in cases related to shoulder disorders and back pain. Class differences in the duration of absence were greatest for cases related to rheumatoid arthritis, disc disorders and (among men) in hip osteoarthritis. The authors conclude that: “Occupational class and diagnosis should be considered when attempting to reduce sickness absence due to MSDs.”Pekkala J et al. “Sickness absence due to different musculoskeletal diagnoses by occupational class: a register-based study among 1.2 million Finnish employees”. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, published online 30 January, 2018.Violence at work in the digital economyThe International Labour Organization’s Bureau for Workers’ Activities and the University of Leicester are conducting research into the psychosocial risks that workers in the digital economy face. The research published so far highlights the ways in which new technologies are used to manage employees, many of whom in the digital sector no longer work in traditional offices and factories but rather in the streets and their own homes. This new-style management, the authors suggest, often uses algorithmic management, wearable tracking technology and people analytics, and carries with it the risk of violence and harassment, the lead researcher on the project, Dr Phoebe Moore, has suggested.Moore P. “The Threat of Physical and Psychosocial Violence and Harassment in Digitalized Work”, http://www.ilo.org/actrav/info/pubs/WCMS_617062/lang–en/index.htmSerious injuries at work in educationThe number of work-related serious injuries suffered by education workers has increased by 24% in the past five years, according to figures obtained under a Freedom of Information request by the GMB union. In 2016/17, 477 assaults were reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) by early years’ providers, schools, colleges and universities. This was up nearly a quarter on the 385 cases reported in 2012/13. A total of 10% of serious injuries suffered by education workers reported to the HSE last year were caused by acts of violence, up from 8% in 2012/13. In total, 385 education workers were so badly injured at work that they took more than seven days off work in 2016/17, the GMB-acquired figures suggest.“Serious Injuries To Education Workers Shoot Up”, http://www.gmb.org.uk/newsroom/education-injuries-shoot-upPsychosocial working conditions within educationLevels of stress-related sickness absence within the UK education sector remain some of the highest of any occupation, yet investigations of psychosocial working conditions that can contribute to stress, including behaviour of students and parents, has not been conducted, a study has argued. To investigate the psychosocial working conditions and prevalence of negative parental and student behaviour in a large sample of school teachers and college lecturers based in England, the researchers carried out a cross-sectional survey of teachers in England. Respondents completed the Management Standards Indicator Tool (MSIT), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4), Student Behaviour Scale and a two-item measure of parental behaviour.Differences in these measures across different teaching roles were then assessed using analysis of variance. Regression analyses were also used to evaluate the association of MSIT, student and parental behaviour on PSS outcomes. Compared to UK benchmark scoring, psychosocial working conditions were found to be at a poor level, with primary teachers in particular exposed to negative parental behaviours, and secondary teachers to poor student behaviour. Demands were consistently associated with perceived stress outcomes across job roles, although management support and relationships with peers also played a part. The demands faced by teachers in England played an important part in the experience of stress, the researchers concluded. Interventions to reduce these demands, and the high frequencies of negative pupil and parental behaviours, should therefore be considered, they added.Ravalier, J M et al. “Working conditions and stress in the English education system.” Occupational Medicine, published online 17 February 2018, https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqy017 Talking toolkits: unpicking Covid-19 return-to-work advice for occupational healthWith the UK now gradually reopening for business, organisations across the workplace health spectrum have been developing toolkits and resources… Occupational health research round-up: April 2018By Sarah Silcox on 6 Apr 2018 in Cardiac, Research, Occupational Health, Personnel Today No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Websitecenter_img Related posts: Occupational Health & Wellbeing research round-up: August 2020Occupational health is “thin line” protecting the Covid-19 frontlineThe workload in healthcare occupational health has increased 20-fold as a… Occupational Health & Wellbeing research round-up: December 2020Fatigue and workplace exercise programmesWork-related fatigue is related to a range of negative consequences, including poor productivity. This study…last_img read more

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Coffee-drinkers less likely to die from certain diseases

first_img Sharing is caring! Share Share Tweet 540 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share HealthInternationalLifestylePrint Coffee-drinkers less likely to die from certain diseases by: Associated Free Press – November 17, 2015 MIAMI, United States (AFP) — People who report drinking three to five cups of coffee per day are less likely to die prematurely from heart disease, suicide, diabetes, or Parkinson’s disease, US researchers said Monday.Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were shown to have benefits, said the study by researchers at the Harvard University Chan School of Public Health published in the November 16 edition of the journal Circulation.The study compared people who don’t drink coffee, or drank less than two cups daily, to those who reported drinking “moderate” amounts of coffee, or up to five cups daily.The study did not prove a cause-and-effect for coffee and the reduced likelihood of certain diseases, but uncovered an apparent link that aligns with previous research, and that scientists would like to probe further.“Bioactive compounds in coffee reduce insulin resistance and systematic inflammation,” said first author Ming Ding, a doctoral student in the Department of Nutrition.“That could explain some of our findings. However, more studies are needed to investigate the biological mechanisms producing these effects.”No protective effect was found against cancer in this study. Some previous research has pointed to a link between coffee consumption and a lower risk of certain cancers.The study was based on data gathered from three large, ongoing surveys including some 300,000 nurses and other health professionals who agree to answer questionnaires about their own medical conditions and habits at regular intervals over the course of 30 years.“In the whole study population, moderate coffee consumption was associated with reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, and suicide,” said the findings.Researchers also accounted for potential confounding factors such as smoking, body mass index, exercise, alcohol consumption, and diet. But the fact that the research relied on surveys, which use self-reported behaviour, could raise questions about its reliability.And experts warned that coffee — a substance adored by many devotees — may not be right for everyone.“Regular consumption of coffee can be included as part of a healthy, balanced diet,” said senior author Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard.“However, certain populations such as pregnant women and children should be cautious about high caffeine intake from coffee or other beverages.”last_img read more

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Salah wins federation battle as Egypt return

first_imgThe stand-off escalated last month when Salah and his lawyer accused the federation of failing to respond to a list of demands involving the player’s “well-being whilst with the national team, and assurances that the image rights violations wouldn’t happen again”.This provoked an angry rebuttal with the FA insisting it would not “favour one player over another”.Salah hit back with a pair of Facebook videos, insisting he was asking for better security for the whole squad at team hotels.Confirmation that peace had broken out between the two sides came when the FA published photographs this week of Egypt President Hani Abou Rida and Salah side by side.Rida was attending a training camp in Alexandria ahead of the Pharaohs’ first outing since crashing out of the World Cup after losing all three first-round matches.They face Niger on Saturday to kick off their 2019 Africa Cup of Nations qualification campaign.At the World Cup, the player was reportedly left unhappy after he was made to appear with Chechen strongman leader Ramzan Kadyrov at Egypt’s training ground in the region in Russia.An earlier disagreement involved his image being used by the team’s main sponsor, telecoms firm WE, when he already had a contract with rival company Vodafone.That rift was eventually resolved following intervention from political leaders.The federation has taken a battering on social media and on the street.“If we had a referendum us Egyptians would say we don’t want this federation,” said Ahmed Assem, a public relations officer.“They are all incapable,” Assem, 59, added, before identifying Salah’a agent as “the cause” of the crisis.As for 22-year-old student Mostafa Mahmoud, he accused the country’s football rulers’ of “wanting to exploit Mohammed Salah as much as possible”.“As they abuse everything the federation has capitalised on the situation for its own financial gains,” said Mahmoud.The damaging dispute sheds light on a more general problem in football which doesn’t know how to look after “its jewels”, suggested Youssef Mohamed, the owner of a modest machine repair shop.“The name of Egypt is on the lips of everyone around the world, Mo Salah is at the heart of a revolution, and we are trying to ruin it,” he said.Faced with all this criticism the Egyptian FA says it has met all of the demands made by Salah.“We’ve imposed a ban on public and media access to the (training) camp by strengthening the security presence,” the federation’s media officer Oussama Ismaïl reported.Aside from the Salah affair, the federation is bedevilled by “a lack of organisation”, argue critics like Amir Abdelhalim, editor of specialist football site Fil Goal.“The fact that Egypt has a star as big as Mohamed Salah figuring as one of the top three players in Europe is a first for Egyptian football,” he said.“We have to manage a level of professionalism that we’re not used to: the highest level.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Egypt’s forward Mohamed Salah looks on during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group A football match between Saudi Arabia and Egypt at the Volgograd Arena in Volgograd on June 25, 2018CAIRO, Egypt, Sep 6 – Mohamed Salah has emerged the victor in his bitter dispute with the Egypt Football Association as the Pharaohs make their return after exiting the World Cup winless.The Liverpool striker had clashed with his country’s FA over image rights violations and personal security.last_img read more

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