Two Studies May Indicate Problems for Vast Ages

first_img(Visited 32 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Two articles in secular science literature point to possible upsets in long-age assumptions for the earth and mankind.Most Human Mutations Are RecentA press release from the University of Washington states, “Harmful protein-coding mutations in people arose largely in the past 5,000 to 10,000 years.”  The Exome Sequencing Project, a consortium of evolutionary geneticists, surveyed a million single-letter changes in the human “exome” (protein-coding genes) for 6,515 people.  “Overall, the researchers predicted that about 81 percent of the single-nucleotide variants in their European samples, and 58 percent in their African samples, arose in the past 5,000 years.”The researchers were able to fit this surprise into the “out-of-Africa” hypothesis by claiming that mutations became fixed more rapidly among Europeans after they migrated.  “The Out of Africa bottleneck led to inefficient purging of the less-harmful mutations,” one explained.  Still, if 150 mutations are passed from parent to offspring on average, it would seem that rate of damage could not go on for many tens or hundreds of thousands of years. See also the Science Daily article on this, that states, “The researchers pointed out that the results illustrate the profound effect recent human evolutionary history has had on the burden of damaging mutations in contemporary populations.”The consortium agrees that their results indicate most harmful mutations in the human gene pool are “of recent origin, evolutionarily speaking.”  Without supporting evidence, though, the researchers used standard Darwinian talking points to hope for a positive outcome, hoping that the large number of recent mutations “may have created a new repository of advantageous genetic variants that adaptive evolution may act upon in future generations.”  Whatever the meaning, Science Daily said that the researchers stated, “The recent dramatic increase in human population size, resulting in a deluge of rare functionally important variation, has important implications for understanding and predicting current and future patterns of human disease and evolution.” Tree Rings Point to a Recent Cosmic Ray EventWhat on earth happened in 768 A.D.?  Charlemagne was busy building his empire, unaware of something happening over his head.  The “Charlemagne Event” was not caused by him; something beyond earth sent a shower of cosmic rays our way.  PhysOrg asks some pointed questions:Until recently, the years 774 and 775 were best known for Charlemagne’s victory over the Lombards. But earlier this year, a team of scientists in Japan discovered a baffling spike in carbon-14 deposits within the rings of cedar trees that matched those same years. Because cosmic rays are tied to carbon-14 concentrations, scientists around the world have wondered about the cause: a nearby supernova, a gamma ray burst in the Milky Way or an intense superflare emanating from the Sun?In the article, Adrian Melott (U of Kansas) presents his argument that the spike came from a coronal mass ejection from the sun.  This CME could have been 10-20 times larger than the largest spike observed in recent times (1859), called the Carrington Event.  Stars beyond our sun have been observed to have very large flares.  Other cosmic sources might include a gamma ray burst or nearby supernova, though the latter would have been observable in the sky.If an extra-large CME occurred during Charlemagne’s battles, it might not have been noticed.  It might have caused a slightly higher risk of skin cancer.  But today if one that size occurred, it would disrupt the world’s power grid and blow out transformers over a wide area.  We’d only have a few minutes warning before our civilization would become seriously disrupted.We offer these findings as stimulations for further research by asking some questions.  If a CME or other cosmic source could dramatically increase carbon-14 production in the atmosphere, what does that do to the calibration profile for radiocarbon dating?  What could be the impact of a large shower of cosmic rays on the atomic clocks used for radiometric dating in general?  Could a cosmic event stimulate accelerated nuclear decay, lowering the activation threshold to give a false reading of longer ages (e.g., more fission tracks) than actually occurred?  If not, how would we know?  Open-minded physicists may want to look into this.Regarding the mutation rate, the finding appears to add more impetus to Dr. John Sanford’s theory of genetic entropy, that the human race could not purge harmful or nearly-neutral mutations fast enough to avoid extinction in very many thousands of years, let alone tens of thousands.  The evolution-talk in the article seems concocted to rescue Darwin’s long ages rather than face the clear implication that humans have not been evolving for hundreds of thousands of years.  Even with lower population sizes, genetic entropy takes its toll.  And if you think bullets to the genome provide a pool of variants that natural selection may act upon in future generations, good luck outrunning extinction while the bad ones add up.last_img read more

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Pirates slay Lions

first_imgFor the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ View comments Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lyceum coach Topex Robinson knew his Pirates would create a massive ripple in NCAA Season 93. He just didn’t expect it to come this early at the expense of defending champion San Beda.ADVERTISEMENT Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Earlier, Jose Rizal U, drawing 26 points from Tey Teodoro, notched its first victory with a 68-54 drubbing of Perpetual Help, while Emilio Aguinaldo College opened its season with an impressive 74-64 victory over St. Benilde.The Pirates got solid contributions across the squad with CJ Perez once again spearheading the charge with 24 points. Mike Nzeusseu had 18 points and 13 rebounds, while Reymar Caduyac shot 16 points and dished out seven assists.Doing most of the damage while Perez rested on the bench, Caduyac, a stocky guard, mustered enough energy to scoot past the San Beda defense for a lay-up with 63 seconds remaining to help seal the victory for the Pirates, 95-89.Robert Bolick finished with 21 points for the Lions, but he lost steam in the end as the Pirates put the clamps on him in crunchtime. San Beda shot 13 of 26 from beyond the arc to stay within striking distance of Lyceum, which led by 12 points in the second period.LYCEUM 96—Perez 24, Nzeusseu 18, Caduyac 16, Marcelino JC 14, Baltazar 9, Marcelino JV 7, Ayaay 4, Tansingco 2, Liwag 2, Santos 0, Ibanez 0, Pretta 0, Cinco 0.ADVERTISEMENT Nonetheless, Robinson showed up for the post-game press conference a very proud man, after the Pirates withstood the Lions’ stellar outside shooting in a 96-91 triumph before a big Friday crowd at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.If there were doubts about the Pirates’ title credentials, they snuffed them out with a gritty performance that saw them absorb the Lions’ best punches, before showing composure down the stretch for their second straight victory.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsChants of “Viva Pirata” rung through the hallways of the arena as the Pirates celebrated a stunning upset for their first win over the Lions in four years.“Again, we’re blessed to be here,” said Robinson. “To play against San Beda, it takes a lot of grit and perseverance. It was just about never giving up, but it’s not about me, it’s about the players.” FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’center_img Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ SAN BEDA 91—Bolick 21, Doliguez 19, Soberano 12, Mocon 10, Noah 9, Presbitero 8, Potts 4, Bahio 4, Adamos 2, Tankoua 2, Carino 0, Tongco 0, Abuda 0.Quarters: 24-18, 50-46, 73-75, 96-91 MOST READ National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Unbeaten Meralco tackles Ceres El Nido residents told to vacate beach homes LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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