Farm outlook

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaNet farm income for Georgia farmers in 2005 probably won’t be as good as in 2004. But it should be a little better than earlier this decade, according to the University of Georgia 2005 Georgia Farm Outlook and Planning Guide.Georgia farmers can expect to get about the same prices in 2005 as they did in 2004 for certain commodities. But prices for others could be worse, according to the report compiled by the agricultural and applied economics department of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Peanut demandPeanut farmers can expect early contract prices to be lower than the $400 per ton they got in 2004, said Nathan Smith, a peanut economist with the UGA Extension Service.”When prices for other commodities are low,” he said, “peanut prices tend to go lower, too.”This is now the fourth peanut crop under the federal peanut program that replaced the old quota-based system. Prices have remained stable under this program, Smith said, due mostly to the steady balance between supply and demand.Georgia planted about 620,000 acres in 2004. Due to forecasted lower prices in other crops, farmers may plant more peanuts in 2005, Smith said. This would increase the supply and possibly lower prices.Demand for U.S. peanuts continues to grow, he said. It’s expected to be about 5.5 percent higher in 2005. U.S. consumers used 3.9 billion pounds of peanuts in 2004.Cotton questionableGeorgia cotton farmers had a good crop last year, despite being battered by tropical storms. The state’s farmers picked around 1.8 million bales. But the United States had a record year of 22.8 million bales. China produced a large crop, too, about 30 million bales. (A bale is roughly 450 pounds of cotton lint.)Cotton prices now are about 40 cents per pound, Shurley said. They could reach as high as 50 cents per pound in 2005. But if the world produces another large crop, they could drop to around 30 cents.”Because of all the stock left over from 2004,” said Don Shurley, a cotton economist with the UGA Extension Service, “it may be midsummer before a clearer picture can be made on what prices will be around harvest.”Two of every three bales of cotton grown in the United States will have to find a foreign buyer, Shurley said. Georgia farmers will have to produce cotton the world wants to buy.Stable cattleGeorgia cattlemen should have another good year in 2005, said Curt Lacy, a UGA Extension Service livestock economist. Good U.S. beef demand coupled with “snug” cattle supplies should keep prices steady to a little higher for cattlemen.Prices should average around $1.05 per pound for Georgia steers around 500 pounds and 92 cents per pound for feeder steers around 700 pounds.”These prices assume we don’t have any major market disruptions (such as a U.S. case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy),” Lacy said.Soybeans sinkA large soybean crop in 2004 has led to a big supply. Because of this, prices are expected to be lower in 2005.Prices this year will probably be around $5.06 to $5.15 per bushel, according to the report. Soybean prices in early 2004 soared close to $10 a bushel in some parts of the country. Prices in 2005 will depend greatly on how South America’s crop turns out.A potentially devastating soybean disease, Asiatic rust, showed up in the U.S. Southeast in late 2004, too late to hurt the crop. But farmers and buyers are waiting to see how the disease will affect the 2005 crop.According to the report, borrowing rates to finance farmland and fixed asset investments will remain good for farmers in early 2005.Details about these and other Georgia crops can be found in the outlook guide next week at www.agecon.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Crabs close out 2016 season with second straight Humboldt Invitational Tournament title

first_imgARCATA >> Sweep the week. Sweep the tournament. Keep the title.It was what Humboldt Crabs manager Tyson Fisher wanted his team to do, and they certainly delivered that — and with plenty of added punch to boot.With wins over the Alameda Merchants (11-6) and the Auburn Wildcats, the Crabs made sure that the second Humboldt Invitational Tournament champion was the same team as in its first edition, with Humboldt taking the season-ending tournament for the second time in as many years on Sunday …last_img read more

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Red Bluff hosts second annual Pickleball tournament

first_img AdChoices广告In the 4.0 Division: 1st … The Red Bluff Pickleball Group held its second annual Deck the Halls with Pickleballs tournament Saturday at Tehama Family Fitness Center.Thirty-seven people and more than 40 gifts were donated to the Tehama Family Fitness gift drive. In the 3.0 Division: 1st was Linda Clawson, 2nd was Betsy Palubeski and 3rd was Cathy D’Ulisse and Betty Lasley. In the 3.5 Division: 1st was Mary Jacobson, 2nd was Trula Whitaker and Karen Falconer, 4th was Jake Jacobson. last_img read more

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Winnipeg in midst of a crystal meth epidemic frontline workers

first_imgBrittany Hobson APTN NewsGrassroots organizations in Winnipeg are calling on the province to address what they are calling a “meth crisis” in the city.This comes following a fire set at a transitional housing complex by a client in the throes of a crystal methamphetamine addiction.On Jan. 7 around 12:30 a.m. a man barricaded himself in a room on the top floor of the Morberg House and set a mattress on fire.A look at the room that was set on fire in the Morberg House. PHOTO: Brittany Hobson/APTNThe man was in the middle of a crystal meth psychosis according to Marion Willis, founder of Morberg House.“We know this person and, believe it or not this person is actually quite a nice guy,” said Willis.“He would never do anything like that except that he had a big slip and the slip was with meth. He entered a deep level of psychosis and that was the outcome.”Staff and founder of Morberg House. PHOTO: Brittany Hobson/APTNThere were about 15 people in the house at the time. No one was injured but Willis said the incident, along with the death of Windy Sinclair , 29, in December, show the extent of the growing crystal meth problem in the city.Sinclair was struggling with a meth addiction at the time her death. Her body was found frozen in a downtown back lane. The mother of four was two-months pregnant at the time. A cause of death has yet to be announced.“The level of meth use in this city has reached an epidemic. The meth psychosis is reaching a crisis that is beyond measure right now,” Willis said.Willis isn’t alone in voicing her concerns. Bear Clan Patrol founder James Favel said the group has seen a significant increase in meth use on the streets.“In our first year of operation, between June and November when the snow fell, we found 12 to 18 needles. The second year we found 300. This last year we’re over 4,000 already.”According to Willis and Favel, accessibility and cost are to blame for the increase. Costs can be as low as $10 for one hit or roughly a quarter of a gram and the high can last for up to 15 hours.Ruth Dixon knows first hand the devastating effects of addiction. Her 28-year-old son started using meth a year ago.“He wasn’t the same after that,” she said. “Once he took it he wasn’t the same. He’s not the son that I knew before.”Dixon works with youth in Winnipeg’s North End. She said the effects from inter-generational trauma are still embedded in the community and kids are seeking ways to self-medicate.“They turn to drugs for comfort, for a way out; to escape. It’s devastating to see our people in that condition,” she said.“Alcohol and marijuana are no longer the painkillers. It’s now stronger drugs.”Winnipeg police are also struggling to address the issue. They say they’ve seen an increase in crystal meth use within the past three years. Adding it’s fueling property crime, violent crime, and dangerous interactions with officers.So far the province has done little work with organizations to combat the crisis, said Willis.“We are the ones that can inform a strategy. We are the ones that can mobilize people and we are the ones that can act quickly, and yet we are invisible to this provincial government,” she said.She wants the province to fund the creation of a drug stabilization unit.Earlier this year the province increased the budget to the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba by $985,500.In a statement to APTN, the office for Minister of Health Kevin Goertzen said, “building upon our experience with opioid addiction, Manitoba’s work with methamphetamine will focus on the development of processes and team work to address challenges with withdrawal management, detoxification and treatment, in order to reduce risks to clients and staff who are working with these individuals.”[email protected]last_img read more

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NATL TOURISM STRATEGY TOWN MEETINGS MOVE TO MC NC AND SALT CAY

first_img Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 28 Oct 2014 – The Natl Tourism Strategy Public Meetings go to North and Middle Caicos and Salt Cay this week…. looking forward to your input, attendance and coverage of these events as the nation marks NATIONAL TOURISM MONTH in November.Middle CaicosThursday, October 30th at 11am,Conch Bar Community CentreNorth CaicosThursday, October 30th at 2pm,The Horse Stable Beach Building Salt CayFriday, October 31st at 11am,The Salt ShedProvidencialesMonday, November 3rd at 6pm,The Gustavus Lightbourne Sports Complex Related Items:middle caicos, national tourism strategy, North caicos, providenciales, salt cay TCI Govt Estate needs $20M injection, Minister announces rent-cutting plan Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp PNP open North & Middle Caicos causeway in tribute New Government contracts mean new clinic for Kew in North Caicoslast_img read more

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Opioid overdoses and Narcan training in San Diego schools

first_imgOpioid overdoses and Narcan training in San Diego schools KUSI Newsroom, January 21, 2019 Posted: January 21, 2019 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego County Board of Education said San Diego schools are experiencing an increase in overdose deaths.A proposed plan would make Narcan available in all schools across the county to address the issue.Vice-President for the San Diego County Board of Education, Mark Powell, said he would like every teacher trained in recognizing the signs of an overdose and would like every site administrator trained in the use of Narcam.Narcan can be used to reverse an opioid overdoses. KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

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