KNOCK AIRPORT EXTENDS OFFERS TO TURKEY FOR DONEGAL HOLIDAY-MAKERS

first_imgKnock Airport.Management at Knock Airport have announced that due to massive interest from Donegal holiday-makers they’ve decided to extend their holiday offers to Turkey.Last week Sunway Holidays have announced a new summer charter service to Turkey from Ireland West Airport Knock.The news was met with a frenzy of excitement from potential customers and the airport was inundated with responses to the new routes. That prompted management to extend the offers even further.Ireland West Airport Knock announced that leading Irish Owned Tour Operator, Sunway Holidays, will operate a weekly charter service next summer to Izmir in Turkey.Donegal holiday-makers regularly fly out of Knock Airport, and Turkey is a hugely popular destination that will no doubt attract more passengers from the county to fly from the airport.Sunway Holidays will operate direct services to Izmir every Saturday from September 12th to October 24th. Sunway are 100% Irish owned and the largest Tour Operator to Turkey from Ireland.This is welcome news for holidaymakers from the North West as the airport adds another European destination to its network.Turkey is a great value holiday destination and has so much to offer to visitors; stunning natural beauty, picturesque historical and archaeological sites, wonderful tourist areas and a tradition of hospitality and competitive prices.It’s not surprising why this country has become one of the world’s most popular tourism destinations.Featured resorts like Kusadasi, Bodrum, Bitez, Gumbet & Altinkum offer a great base from which to visit the many famous landmarks. Some of the world’s most amazing natural sites are literally on your doorstep. Turkey has over eight thousand kilometres of coastline, in excess of 350 blue flag beaches and marinas offering a variety of water-sports.Welcoming the news, Joe Gilmore, Managing Director, Ireland West Airport Knock said ‘We are delighted to add Turkey to our list of sun destinations for 2015.“Its great news to be introducing new services with Sunway, Irelands largest tour operator, and a 100% Irish owned company, providing even more choice of sun destinations for the people of the West, North West and Midlands regions of Ireland.“We are looking forward to working with Sunway and the trade in the region in promoting this service in the coming months’ Commenting on this new service, Tanya Airey, Managing Director of Sunway Holidays “Sunway is delighted to reintroduce the many wonders of Turkey to the West of Ireland.“Kusadasi, the most popular resort, is one of the largest and best known of the Aegean Sea holiday resorts in Turkey and has been the most popular resort for Irish tourists for many years.“It is a port city built along the shores of a bay and offers an abundance of activities including historical and religious excursions, shopping, water sports, excellent restaurants, bars and nightclubs.“Kusadasi also has two waterparks making it an appealing destination for families also”For further information on package holidays to Turkey visit www.sunway.ie or call (01) 2311800 or contact your local travel agent.KNOCK AIRPORT EXTENDS OFFERS TO TURKEY FOR DONEGAL HOLIDAY-MAKERS was last modified: March 12th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BusinessFeaturesnewslast_img read more

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“Beautifully Engineered”: Giant Pterosaur Compared to Aircraft

first_imgImagine an “aircraft engineer trying to convert a Eurofighter into a jumbo jet while it was still flying.”  That’s how David Martill (U of Portsmouth, UK) described the abilities of a baby pterosaur growing into a large adult, a BBC News story says.  Evidence suggests that pterosaurs were capable of flying soon after hatching.  Some had wingspans up to 60 feet, nearly six times that of the largest living bird, and as big as a medium size commercial aircraft or F14 fighter, according to MSNBC.    An article in The Scotsman provides further comparisons with aircraft design:Their enormous sail-like wings, made of a thin hair-covered membrane between their two front limbs, allowed them to use air currents to fly with little effort over huge distances.    “Their flight membranes could be controlled by adjusting the angle of the forelimbs at the shoulder, the elbow and at the base of the hyper-elongated flight finger,” said Dr Martill.  “In addition it could be controlled by movement of the hind limbs at the hips, the knees and to some degree at the ankle.    “This gave pterosaurs far more flight control than birds of equivalent size.”    Analysis of fossils has shown the intricate details of its super-strong but light bone structure.  Dr Martill said they could even be used to help with modern aircraft design.    “They took bone to new limits in terms of making it thin yet strong,” he said.  “Their skeletons were very lightly constructed and most of their bones were hollow and enclosed an air sac system connected to the lungs.”    “The bone itself was composed of many microscopically thin layers stacked together like a spirally bound plywood tube.”    “Sometimes the bones had cross-sectional shapes that provided added strength, such as D, T and A shapes.”   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Pterosaurs have no evolutionary line to any living creatures in the fossil record, the BBC article states.  The Scotsman article claims that their nearest relatives are crocodiles, but the MSNBC news article notes that they had a “very different shoulder joint” among all the other adaptations for flying.    Fossils of a variety of forms have been found in such widely-scattered locales as Brazil, North America, Mexico, Romania, and Israel.  Contrary to previous ideas that pictured pterosaurs as mere gliders, Martill thinks they flew rather elegantly: “Their ability to utilise air currents, thermals and ground effects would astonish aeroplane designers.”  They were “beautifully engineered,” he remarked.Engineering is not the language of Darwinism.  The Darwin Party lacks the training to deal with the facts of biology as observed, and the history of biology as read in the fossil record.  The article states, “Indeed, there is still great debate about where exactly they should be placed in the evolution of life forms on Earth.”  The answer is, of course, they should be taken out of the evolution fairy tale book, and placed into the engineering textbook, where “pterosaurs could inform modern aircraft design.”  Were the references to evolution really useful for anything, other than entertainment?  We would like to see the transitional forms between crocodiles and beautifully engineered aircraft, or watch some crocodile gliding experiments.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Two Studies May Indicate Problems for Vast Ages

first_img(Visited 32 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Two articles in secular science literature point to possible upsets in long-age assumptions for the earth and mankind.Most Human Mutations Are RecentA press release from the University of Washington states, “Harmful protein-coding mutations in people arose largely in the past 5,000 to 10,000 years.”  The Exome Sequencing Project, a consortium of evolutionary geneticists, surveyed a million single-letter changes in the human “exome” (protein-coding genes) for 6,515 people.  “Overall, the researchers predicted that about 81 percent of the single-nucleotide variants in their European samples, and 58 percent in their African samples, arose in the past 5,000 years.”The researchers were able to fit this surprise into the “out-of-Africa” hypothesis by claiming that mutations became fixed more rapidly among Europeans after they migrated.  “The Out of Africa bottleneck led to inefficient purging of the less-harmful mutations,” one explained.  Still, if 150 mutations are passed from parent to offspring on average, it would seem that rate of damage could not go on for many tens or hundreds of thousands of years. See also the Science Daily article on this, that states, “The researchers pointed out that the results illustrate the profound effect recent human evolutionary history has had on the burden of damaging mutations in contemporary populations.”The consortium agrees that their results indicate most harmful mutations in the human gene pool are “of recent origin, evolutionarily speaking.”  Without supporting evidence, though, the researchers used standard Darwinian talking points to hope for a positive outcome, hoping that the large number of recent mutations “may have created a new repository of advantageous genetic variants that adaptive evolution may act upon in future generations.”  Whatever the meaning, Science Daily said that the researchers stated, “The recent dramatic increase in human population size, resulting in a deluge of rare functionally important variation, has important implications for understanding and predicting current and future patterns of human disease and evolution.” Tree Rings Point to a Recent Cosmic Ray EventWhat on earth happened in 768 A.D.?  Charlemagne was busy building his empire, unaware of something happening over his head.  The “Charlemagne Event” was not caused by him; something beyond earth sent a shower of cosmic rays our way.  PhysOrg asks some pointed questions:Until recently, the years 774 and 775 were best known for Charlemagne’s victory over the Lombards. But earlier this year, a team of scientists in Japan discovered a baffling spike in carbon-14 deposits within the rings of cedar trees that matched those same years. Because cosmic rays are tied to carbon-14 concentrations, scientists around the world have wondered about the cause: a nearby supernova, a gamma ray burst in the Milky Way or an intense superflare emanating from the Sun?In the article, Adrian Melott (U of Kansas) presents his argument that the spike came from a coronal mass ejection from the sun.  This CME could have been 10-20 times larger than the largest spike observed in recent times (1859), called the Carrington Event.  Stars beyond our sun have been observed to have very large flares.  Other cosmic sources might include a gamma ray burst or nearby supernova, though the latter would have been observable in the sky.If an extra-large CME occurred during Charlemagne’s battles, it might not have been noticed.  It might have caused a slightly higher risk of skin cancer.  But today if one that size occurred, it would disrupt the world’s power grid and blow out transformers over a wide area.  We’d only have a few minutes warning before our civilization would become seriously disrupted.We offer these findings as stimulations for further research by asking some questions.  If a CME or other cosmic source could dramatically increase carbon-14 production in the atmosphere, what does that do to the calibration profile for radiocarbon dating?  What could be the impact of a large shower of cosmic rays on the atomic clocks used for radiometric dating in general?  Could a cosmic event stimulate accelerated nuclear decay, lowering the activation threshold to give a false reading of longer ages (e.g., more fission tracks) than actually occurred?  If not, how would we know?  Open-minded physicists may want to look into this.Regarding the mutation rate, the finding appears to add more impetus to Dr. John Sanford’s theory of genetic entropy, that the human race could not purge harmful or nearly-neutral mutations fast enough to avoid extinction in very many thousands of years, let alone tens of thousands.  The evolution-talk in the article seems concocted to rescue Darwin’s long ages rather than face the clear implication that humans have not been evolving for hundreds of thousands of years.  Even with lower population sizes, genetic entropy takes its toll.  And if you think bullets to the genome provide a pool of variants that natural selection may act upon in future generations, good luck outrunning extinction while the bad ones add up.last_img read more

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OPP Aboriginal unit fell under sway of Six Nations in Caledonia book

first_imgBy Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsAn Ontario Provincial Police unit created to deal with First Nations protests and blockades developed “Stockholm syndrome” with the leaders behind the Six Nations land seizure of a residential development in Caledonia, Ont., a new book claims.The recently released book, called Helpless, Caledonia’s nightmare of fear and anarchy and how the law failed all of us, was written by Globe and Mail columnist Christie Blatchford.The book focuses primarily on the lives of Caledonia residents who were caught in the middle of an escalating land claims battle between the Iroquois of Six Nations and the federal government that dates back 200 years and was even a file on the desk of Canada’s first prime minister.Blatchford’s Caledonia book aims to prove that the OPP administered “two-tiered justice” that treated the First Nations protestors more favourably than the non-Aboriginal Canadians caught in the cross-fire.The book relates stories from Caledonia residents who say they felt abandoned by the police who did little when non-Aboriginal locals faced harassment and threats from Six Nations protestors, had their cars sabotaged or rocks thrown at their homes. Caledonia residents also recounted how they felt that the police treated the non-Aboriginal residents who were simply trying to protect their property and lives like criminals.Blatchford also delves into the workings of the Aboriginal Relations Team (ART), a special OPP unit created in 2004 in response to the shooting of Dudley George at Ipperwash Provincial Park in 1995. Quoting unnamed and named OPP sources, Blatchford paints a picture of an ineffectual unit that appeared to have fallen under the sway of Six Nations leaders.The Caledonia crisis exploded after the OPP botched a raid in April 2006 on Douglas Creek Estates (DCE), a nascent residential development on long-claimed land that was seized by Six Nations residents.The ART team was led at the time of the Caledonia uprising by Dudley George’s cousin, Superintendant Ron (Spike) George, who was the head of Aboriginal Issues, Operations for the OPP.Blatchford wrote that frontline OPP officers were beginning to wonder which side the ART team was on.According to Blatchford, ART initially relied on four “contacts” from Six Nations and they included Dick Hill, Clyde Powless, Jesse Porter and Janie Jamieson, who was one of the original protestors to march onto DCE.Blatchford writes that in the first years of the Caledonia crisis, George and the ART would check any planned DCE-related OPP operation with Hill.“The OPP was essentially seeking the permission of the occupiers before taking any law-enforcement action,” writes Blatchford.Blatchford also quotes a “well-regarded OPP officer” who says Hill vetoed numerous OPP operations.“‘The answer was always the same: ‘If we do this there will be a huge backlash, rising tensions and the natives will have 200 men here at sunrise blocking roads,” this officer says. ‘So every operation was stood down.’”Blatchford writes that George fell “into a posture of trying to please or appease (Hill)” and traces it back to the initial encounter between Hill and George and the discussion of an ancient battle between the Iroquois and Ojibway.“(Hill) is alleged to have made a disparaging remark about his tribe (Iroquois) having routed George’s (Ojibway), and (Hill) said, ‘We kicked your ass hundreds of years ago, and I’ll be fucked if I negotiate with you.’”Blatchford quotes former Windspeaker reporter Paul Barnsley, and now the head of APTN’s investigative unit, to describe Hill as a “Warrior Society member.”Hill could not be reached for comment.Quoting Karl Walsh, the OPP’s union head, Blatchford writes that the ART had developed “Stockholm syndrome” as a result of working too closely with the key players from Six Nations.Stockholm syndrome is a term usually used to describe what happens to hostages who begin to empathize with their captors after a long period of captivity.“‘(Walsh) kept hearing that the ART members were ‘talking to, cavorting with, drinking with , eating with, getting subject to Stockholm syndrome with’ the occupiers and their leaders,” writes Blatchford.Blatchford also writes that “OPP members were also hearing reports of the ART becoming too tight with some of the less savoury characters” of the Six Nations land seizure and that the unit was withholding key intelligence from other OPP units.ART’s actions defended by OPPThe ART no longer exists, but it became a model for the existing provincial liaison team program created to deal with all major events, including First Nations issues, dignitary visits and other situations where there is a high potential for conflict, said OPP spokesman Insp. Dave Ross.Ross said the unit’s work in building ties to the Six Nations leadership actually “minimized the potential for violence and bloodshed in a very trying” situation.“They did admirably well in that situation in building that trust and relationship that allows that dialogue to happen when we get to serious incidents,” said Ross.Ross dismissed the allegations of two-tiered justice, saying that the OPP laid a total of 162 charges against 69 people in relation to incidents in and around the seized DCE territory. He said about 46 OPP officers were injured trying to keep the peace.“It is a difficult and complex matter,” said Ross. “Our primary role is to prevent violence and keep the peace.”Those who study and have policed conflicts between First Nations communities and the Canadian state say the OPP was caught in the middle of a volatile and political conflict that they had no ability to solve.A security source, who requested anonymity, but was involved in the early days of Caledonia, Ipperwash and with policing the Mohawk Warrior Society, said that the Oka crisis, the Gustafson Lake conflict and Ipperwash all weighed heavily on the decisions of the OPP. The source defended the actions of George and the ART.“The ART were really trying to embed themselves with the people in the community and the people involved in the disputes,” said the source. “What happened during Oka and Ipperwash was that communication breaks down and if you don’t know the players and they don’t know you, how do you build it? You can’t build a house when it’s burning down.”The source said that the Six Nations leadership was also trying control a “few hotheads” within its ranks.“Sometimes that is hard to do without inflaming things,” the source said.The source said the OPP were facing a well-financed group that had widespread community support. There was no easy way for police to dislodge Six Nations from the DCE site so they had to adjust their response accordingly.“Whenever you attach emotion and history to a situation, don’t expect a quick resolution and don’t think that force is going to resolve it.”The people who lived near the conflict zone became victims of historical and political forces far outside their control, said the source.“When you are standing in the middle of a fire, whether you put yourself there, or someone else put you there, you are going to get burned a little, it is going to be tough.”Queen’s University military studies professor Douglas Bland says police forces in general are not equipped to deal with conflicts involving First Nations and land claims.A situation like Caledonia cannot be treated purely as a criminal matter because it carries heavy political and historical baggage often involving a whole community, Bland said. Police in these situations have to act more like UN Peacekeepers because things could easily spread across the country.“The police are barely trained to deal with these kinds of things and they don’t like to deal with these kinds of things,” said Bland, who recently wrote a novel on a fictitious Indigenous revolt. “The thing that you hope to do in these peacekeeping missions is to settle everybody down and put out the immediate fires and get reasonable members of both communities to sit down and sort things out…a bar fight, they can sort out, but a community in uproar, they can’t deal with it, and anyway, that is not their business.”He said police are forced to make stark choices when it comes to keeping a lid on these sorts of situations.“(The OPP) didn’t want this local situation to explode in their face where they couldn’t control it and they were willing to tolerate the discomfort of the Canadians who had settled on what was reserve land rather than try and force the Six Nations people to give up that,” said Bland. “(The OPP) were more willing to take the heat from citizens who took them to court and lost their houses because they knew they would be compensated, rather than get into a fight with people on the reserve, who were armed and no one knew where that would go.”last_img read more

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NATL TOURISM STRATEGY TOWN MEETINGS MOVE TO MC NC AND SALT CAY

first_img Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 28 Oct 2014 – The Natl Tourism Strategy Public Meetings go to North and Middle Caicos and Salt Cay this week…. looking forward to your input, attendance and coverage of these events as the nation marks NATIONAL TOURISM MONTH in November.Middle CaicosThursday, October 30th at 11am,Conch Bar Community CentreNorth CaicosThursday, October 30th at 2pm,The Horse Stable Beach Building Salt CayFriday, October 31st at 11am,The Salt ShedProvidencialesMonday, November 3rd at 6pm,The Gustavus Lightbourne Sports Complex Related Items:middle caicos, national tourism strategy, North caicos, providenciales, salt cay TCI Govt Estate needs $20M injection, Minister announces rent-cutting plan Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp PNP open North & Middle Caicos causeway in tribute New Government contracts mean new clinic for Kew in North Caicoslast_img read more

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