‘Real business lack is hindering me

first_imgI have worked in HR since I graduated nine years ago. I have completed myCIPD studies and have a Masters degree. Although my career has steadilydeveloped, I’m beginning to feel that my lack of ‘real’ business experienceoutside HR may be slowing my progress. Any suggestions? Victoria Wall, managing director, Victoria Wall Associates Having gained nine years experience, you will be regarded as an HR expert byyour colleagues and line management; however the more ‘business’ knowledge youcan demonstrate, the more opportunities will open up to you. Lack of experiencewill not slow your progress, if you make every effort to gain real businessknowledge of the industry sector in which you work. Ensure you are up to date with new developments within your organisation andindustry sector, read trade rather than just HR press, and if possible attendinternal meetings and training courses as an observer. Good business acumenshown by knowledge of the ‘bottom line’ and by understanding the sector you areworking in will raise your credibility internally and develop your career tothe next stage. Grant Taylor, consultant, Macmillan Davies Hodes It would be interesting to find out why you feel your progress is slow andhow you are measuring your progress. It could be you are ready for your nextmove up the ladder and feel you lack experience at a business rather thandepartmental level. With your good academic background you now need practicalexperience at the next level, and to gain this you need to add a ‘businessperspective’ to everything you do. You need to consider how you may be able to add value to the bottom line ofthe business from an HR perspective and then be proactive in taking your ideasto the senior management team. By doing this you may find yourself included more readily in strategy planningand business level decision-making. If you are unsure about how you may achievethis, you need a mentor to learn from. Attach yourself to someone you can learnfrom by for example, asking to shadow the HR director in some of their work, orconsider moving on to somewhere where you will have more involvement at thislevel if that is not possible where you are now. Peter Sell, joint managing director, DMS Consultancy While you may read about the HR impact on the business in this and othermagazines, the reality is that many organisations do not yet recognise thecontribution HR can bring to business effectiveness. This can be attributed toa number of factors; for example the lack of opportunity to be involved in thebusiness, the perception of senior staff on the role of HR, the need for HR tobalance business needs with a professional and ethical approach to the peopleissues. You need to look at your organisation and see if any of the above applies.If you think not, you need to push for more involvement. Give the senior teamexamples of how HR can better support the business. If you feel your present organisation will not be supportive, move on. Youmay consider a general management role to broaden your experience and then lookto move back into HR at a later date. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. ‘Real business lack is hindering meOn 23 Jul 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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USA: Winners of Naval Construction Force Battle “E” Award Disclosed

first_img View post tag: Winners View post tag: Navy View post tag: Battle View post tag: usa January 18, 2013 View post tag: Force View post tag: construction View post tag: Naval View post tag: E Awardcenter_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Disclosed Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Winners of Naval Construction Force Battle “E” Award Disclosed Commander First Naval Construction Division (1NCD) recently announced the winners of the Naval Construction Force Battle “E” award, which recognizes outstanding operational performance of its Naval Mobile Construction Battalions.Atlantic Fleet winners are Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 11 (Active) and NMCB 27 (Reserve). Winners from the Pacific Fleet are NMCB 4 (Active) and NMCB 25 (Reserve).While supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, NMCB 11 supported engineering operations for three supported commands operating in 77 dispersed locations throughout six regional commands. Based in Gulfport, Miss., the battalion completed more than 70 projects and 46,000 mandays of construction, counter-insurgency operations and training support to Afghan engineer forces. “Your efforts improved force protection, enhanced freedom of movement, and improved quality of life for U.S. and coalition forces, and set the stage for the surge drawdown of U.S. and coalition forces and the eventual transfer of the mission to the Afghan forces,” wrote Rear Adm. Mark Handley, Commander 1NCD.Headquartered in Brunswick, Maine, NMCB 27 was commended for accomplishments in preparation for and during its deployment to U.S. Southern Command. “The ‘Skibees’ have clearly demonstrated that you are deserving of selection as ‘Best of Type,’ and I congratulate you on a job well done,” Rear Adm. Handley wrote.Its unit level training included two command post exercises, embark training exercises, a communications exercise and a field training exercise involving 376 battalion personnel. They completed more than 31,000 mandays of training and 19,000 mandays of homeport and contingency construction. They deployed an 85-person Air Detachment to Guantanamo Bay and completed projects there as well as El Salvador and Peru. “Throughout a challenging year, NMCB 4 has consistently and unequivocally proven their commitment to excellence and an uncompromising ‘can-do’ attitude,” wrote Rear Adm. Handley.During its fourth consecutive CENTCOM deployment, NMCB 4 worked at 72 sites across all six regional commands in Afghanistan. It provided mobility support by establishing and improving low-water crossing sites, emplacing bridges and building roads. The battalion completed 72 projects consisting of more than 42,000 mandays of tasking. Returning to homeport in Port Hueneme, Calif., it executed a solid homeport training plan for preparation for the next deployment to Europe and Africa.NMCB 25 ramped up its training schedule to account for a six-month acceleration of its deployment timeline. Headquartered at Fort McCoy, Wis., the battalion completed 20,000 mandays of construction support and training and attained more than 790 new technical skills. They maintained 100-percent accountability in their supply outlets.“Through commitment and focus on personnel programs you have been successful in dramatically improving metrics in all program areas and setting the mark for foundation training,” Rear Adm. Handley wrote.“My congratulations to the Seabees of NMCB 4, NMCB 11, NMCB 25 and NMCB 27. Your efforts in helping our supported commanders achieve their desired effects were truly inspirational and exemplified the Seabee can-do motto.”[mappress]Naval Today Staff, January 18, 2013; Image: 1NCD Training & Education USA: Winners of Naval Construction Force Battle “E” Award Disclosed Share this articlelast_img read more

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Rapper engages in activism through music

first_imgFrom its roots in the Bronx in the 1970s til now, hip-hop and rap music has had its finger on the pulse of social issues in the United States. From Public Enemy calling to “fight the power” in inner-cities in the 1980s to Kendrick Lamar’s expression of what it means to be black in America in “To Pimp a Butterfly” and Run the Jewels’ songs of protest against police brutality, social activism has been at the heart of this genre.Monday night, in the Carey Auditorium of the Hesburgh Library, Aisha Fukushima, a “rap activist” or “RAPtivist,” explored the ability of hip-hop and rap to act as a catalyst for change and explained how her background led her to a career in activism. Fukushima also performed a few recently released songs.Fukushima said her unique upbringing contributed to her early political views and allowed her to witness the power of music.“I grew up as a multiracial child, both African-American and Japanese heritage, and for me, that looked liked living in Seattle, Washington, as well as Yokohama, Japan,” Fukushima said. “I think at this early age, I started to see how global music was. That pulse of music to be able to travel around the globe. No matter where you’re performing … I didn’t know the word solidarity yet, but I was feeling that through music.”When she spent time back in the United States, Fukushima said that she first experienced the racism that would later help inform the civil rights message she would later advocate.“I was one of very few students of color in the entire school,” she said. “We had our tires slashed over 17 times. There were different seeds of hatred and discontent that would manifest sometimes in actions like that, even in my local community.”Fukushima said one avenue through which she was able to express her feelings about discrimination was through writing poetry, which she could share with her high school classes. Fukushima found that students were more likely to listen to her concerns through this medium. This experience led her towards rap, a genre that she believes there are many misconceptions about, she said.“Often times, we get the booty, bling, bullets and sometimes bourbon,” she said. “Part of my experience in traveling around the world and connecting with hip hop activists — whether they be locally or globally — there is more to the hip-hop identity than this single story.”Fukushima said that the activist roots of hip-hop are come from the Bronx.“People used the phrase, ‘The Bronx is burning,’ to describe [the 1970s] because the landlords figured out they could acquire more money by burning down buildings and collecting insurance money than through the rent,” she said. “Hip-hop was born out of this place. Hip-hop was, in many ways, a response to the destruction that was going on.”Fukushima said that this activism was not limited to the United States and cited the impact of the Senegalese rapper Didier Awadi.“He created an album, ‘Presidénts de l’Afrique,’ talking about the different African leaders he didn’t see outlined in any of his textbooks,” she said. “He traveled the continent of Africa for 10 years collecting archival materials, speaking to the families who were still alive, and putting that into an album and music videos.”Recently, Fukushima’s own activism has centered around helping the people of Flint, Michigan. “One of the issues that compelled me to speak out was Flint, and the water crisis there that has recently reached 1000 days of them not having access to clean water,” she said.Recognizing the severity of this crisis, Fukushima recorded and released a music video about the situation in Flint with all proceeds helping the residents of the city.Fukushima also advocated for restoring parts of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy.“A lot of time King gets boiled down to single stories — whether he is a martyr in his death or we celebrate him and his non-violence [or] we just focus on the work he did around segregation and bus boycotts,” she said.  “But people tend to leave out the narrative about the last year of his life … Around this time, he spoke out against the Vietnam War [and]he started to speak out about three main pillars … he wanted to talk about racism, militarism and policy.”Fukushima ended by advocating to engage in social activism, citing Cornel West’s idea that “justice is what love looks like in public.”Tags: #Aisha Fukushima, activism, MLK, raplast_img read more

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CVPS signs two power contracts – fills portfolio for 2012

first_imgCentral Vermont Public Service (NYSE-CV) has signed two new power supply contracts, filling the 2012 gap in its portfolio created by the end of the existing contract with Vermont Yankee, at attractive prices. CVPS also announced preferred and common stock options.The contracts are for so-called ‘system power,’ meaning they are not conditioned on the operation of individual power generation sources.  Because CVPS plans to conduct similar auctions in the future and bidders were unknown to each other, CVPS stated that the names of the winning bidders and full details of the process will remain confidential. ‘These contracts serve to ensure our reliable power supply through the end of 2012 at very competitive prices,’ CVPS President and CEO Larry Reilly said.  ‘We were able to secure contracts at firm prices — where performance is guaranteed such that the sellers would pay to replace any power should they otherwise fail to deliver.’ CVPS, in cooperation with World Energy Inc., an energy management services firm, conducted a highly structured Internet auction that involved approximately a dozen prescreened northeastern generators and energy marketers in bidding to provide CVPS’s needed supplies.  When the bidding closed, CVPS signed two contracts with an average price of approximately $47.50 per megawatt-hour, or 4.75 cents per kilowatt-hour. The contracts will provide about 570,000 megawatt-hours of energy, or about 20 percent of CVPS’s power supply during the life of the contracts, for $27 million. ‘In a circumstance such as this, we have found that employing a competitive auction process obtains the best deals for our customers,’ said Reilly.  ‘These purchases will help us remain among the lowest-cost utilities in New England, despite cost pressures from infrastructure upgrades, particularly from transmission improvements and higher-cost, new renewable power content requirements.’ One contract is for energy supplied 24 hours per day from April 1, 2012 through the end of next year, while the other contract will provide peak and off-peak power during specific periods when CVPS had remaining supply gaps next year. The contracts will also fill CVPS’s energy needs during the planned Vermont Yankee refueling outage this fall.  Some of the energy will be purchased for as little as $39 a megawatt-hour, or 3.9 cents per kilowatt-hour.  CVPS currently pays Vermont Yankee 4.4 cents per kWh, and Hydro-Quebec about 6.2 cents per kWh.  Market prices, though generally, relatively low of late, were as high as several hundred dollars per megawatt-hour during the recent heat wave. The new contracts join several other longer-term agreements CVPS has signed to replenish its portfolio after the current Vermont Yankee and Hydro-Quebec contracts end.  CVPS has signed new contracts largely for renewable energy from Hydro-Quebec, wind farms in Coos County, N.H., and southern Vermont, and a Gilman, Vt., hydro project. CVPS is also in the process of purchasing the Vermont Marble Power Division of Omya, including four hydroelectric facilities with a current combined capacity of 18.5 megawatts, which CVPS plans to upgrade.  After the acquisition, CVPS will own and operate the largest fleet of hydroelectric generating stations in New England.  In large part due to its electricity supplies, Vermont has the lowest per-capita air emissions in the country. CVPS continues to expand its Cow Power generation; recently built a 50-kilowatt solar project on Route 7 in Rutland Town; and upgraded a Passumpsic River hydro facility in St. Johnsbury. Common Stock DividendThat out of reserved and unrestricted earnings of the Company a quarterly dividend at the rate of twenty-three cents ($.23) per share is hereby declared on the issued and outstanding shares of Common Stock, $6 Par Value, payable November 15, 2011 to stockholders of record at the close of business November 4, 2011.Preferred Stock DividendThat out of the reserved and unrestricted retained earnings of the Company quarterly dividends on the Preferred Stock, $100 Par Value, of $1.04 per share on the 4.15% Dividend Series, $1.16 per share on the 4.65% Dividend Series, $1.19 per share on the 4.75% Dividend Series, and $1.34375 per share on the 5.375% Dividend Series, are hereby declared payable October 1, 2011 to stockholders of record at the close of business September 21, 2011. CVPS. 8.1.2011last_img read more

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4 data challenges and the opportunity for credit unions

first_imgCredit unions are facing several unique challenges. As an industry, credit unions have fallen behind competing fintech startups and major retail banks. It is vital for financial institutions to understand the problems they are facing and how they are possible to overcome. In 2018, the credit union industry must work together to push past these challenges and remain relevant in the age of digital transformation. ChallengesDisparate DataCredit unions utilize numerous data sources, and each speaks a different language. If data sources are not integrated properly, then the organization does not have a reliable single version of the truth. One system or even department should not report different numbers than another. It is important to trust the data, or else the decisions that are made as a result of the analysis cannot be trusted either.  To add to this challenge, most credit unions are stuck in “Excel Hell”. Without the proper tools in place for data standardization/analysis, it is common to turn to manual spreadsheets. However, this is incredibly time consuming, prone to errors, and ultimately only provides a static report. Outsourcing AnalyticsIn the credit union industry today, there is a heavy and unhealthy reliance on sending data from the credit union to 3rd party vendors for analysis. The major concerns with this model are security and data ownership/monetization. A credit union’s member data is extremely valuable, and trusted to be kept safe by members. There is an element of risk any time data is removed from the firewall and sent to a 3rd party. On that note, credit unions must realize the value of data, and learn to monetize it for themselves. By providing this data to 3rd parties, credit unions are allowing these other companies to monetize their data for their own financial gain, not that of the credit union that supplied the data. Often, credit unions even must “buy back” their data from these 3rd parties in the form of a new dashboard or model. However, it is now feasible for even smaller credit unions to own perform such analysis on their own infrastructure, own their data, and monetize member data for the benefit of the member. Lack of Resources Of course, the disparate data and need to outsource analytics may be a result of lacking resources. To tackle advanced analytics effectively, financial institutions are expected to invest in and maintain a scalable enterprise data warehouse solution, a complementary data lake, a business intelligence team comprised of architects, data analysts, data scientists, and more; easily totaling a sum that is out of range for nearly all credit unions. In 2017, a single major bank’s budget, solely for analytics, was $100 Million. How can credit unions keep up with organization committed to analytics with these types of budgets? Time to MarketCredit unions are behind in data analytics. Members expect the types of service and experiences provided by companies such as Amazon, Domino’s, and Starbucks. In 10 years, there have been 18 iterations of the iPhone. Apple remains a successful and innovative company because it is willing to disrupt itself, and reinvent its offerings just months after a new model has been released. As we’ve seen, traditional data warehousing methods in the credit union have been costly, very time consuming, and largely unsuccessful. Even if it is successful, credit unions cannot afford to invest 3+ years in a data initiative. The industry is already behind, and institutions need to move quickly to remain relevant. OpportunityWith these challenges, how can a credit union keep up and stay relevant to members? After all, even one of these topics could present serious hardships. Fortunately, credit unions have one unique and incredibly powerful advantage: collaboration. When credit unions collaborate and utilize a standardized data model, everything changes. Together, credit unions have all the resources required to do amazing things with analytics. Credit unions that speak the same language can work together, rather than on their own data islands. Reports that are built on the same standard can be shared across credit unions, dramatically reducing the time and cost of report writing. When, say, 100 credit unions are working together and sharing reports and advanced analytics applications, each participating credit union is essentially equipped with 100x more reports in any given period of time. This collaboration empowers credit unions to maintain ownership of their data while minimizing risk, the need for additional resources, and the need to ship data to 3rd parties. This advantage only continues to grow with passing time and a growing platform. The fact is, for advanced and predictive analytics, credit unions lack not only the tools and expertise, but also sufficient data. With an industry standard data model, credit unions are no longer limited by their own data. Credit unions have the opportunity to collaborate and pool data. This means pooling data to enable increased confidence in analytic models, and even real-time benchmarking capabilities. Overcoming any of these challenges has proven to be extremely difficult for any individual credit union. Tackling these and achieving advanced analytics capabilities is not something that can be expected of a single financial institution. However, collectively, credit unions are in a great position to digitally transform and revolutionize the credit union movement.   22SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Portz Mark Portz joined OnApproach in 2016 as a Marketing Specialist. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Business in Entrepreneurial Management and Public/Nonprofit Management from the University of Minnesota. … Web: www.onapproach.com Detailslast_img read more

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Pelosi out of touch with the real people

first_imgIn the Jan. 12 Gazette, Wal-Mart announced it would use the money it expects to save to raise wages and award bonuses to over 1 million hourly employees. Wal-Mart is raising its minimum wage from $9 to $11. That is a 22 percent increase. For a full-time worker, it’s over $4,000 a year. Wal-Mart is also awarding one-time bonuses of up to $1,000 to hourly workers, based on longevity. A full-time, minimum wage employee with sufficient longevity could see an additional $5,000-plus this year.Wal-Mart expects to pay out over $300 million this year in minimum wage increases and $400 million in bonuses. This is a very nice increase for employees, but it also injects a significant amount of money into the American economy. No rational person would call this “insignificant.”As minority leader of the House, Ms. Pelosi earns $193,400 a year. She also is reportedly worth more than $196 million. Now, I can see how $5,000 might seem like “crumbs” to Ms. Pelosi. However, a full time $9-an-hour worker makes $18,720 a year. To that worker, I expect that an additional $5,000 looks (with apologies) Huuuuge. Certainly not “insignificant.” (Here’s a clue for Ms. Pelosi: I receive a monthly Social Security check. It’s scheduled to increase 2 percent this year. Now that’s insignificant.)Nancy Pelosi has become a multimillionaire while (supposedly) acting as a public servant. She’s clearly out of touch with those living on the economic fringe. Her constituents, especially those working for Wal-Mart, should see to it that she gets voted out of a job.George NigrinyScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionHouse Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has characterized the bonuses and wage increases announced in the wake of the recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act as “crumbs,” “pathetic” and “insignificant.”last_img read more

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The power of protein: 2018 category analysis

first_imgThe Grocer may use your contact data to keep you informed of its products and services by email. You can withdraw your marketing consent at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in such email or by sending an email to [email protected] . More information on our processing can be found in our Privacy Notice . By submitting this form, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Privacy Notice . Company: BrandView Format: PDFLength: 10 pagesType: White Paper The UK protein market has exploded. With more SKUs, NPDs and market entrants than ever before, protein popularity is prompting brands and retailers to evolve to meet the needs of increasingly health conscious shoppers.Brand View’s exclusive analysis, in conjunction with Kellogg’s and Primal Pantry, uncovers the key factors driving the categories’ explosive growth and how retailers are evolving to meet this demand.-Category growth-Manufacturers, Retailers and NPDs-Price disparity – are you paying more for protein?-Optimising protein placement-Future trendsDownload today and see how you can capitalise on this burgeoning market:last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces Additional Apprenticeship Opportunities for Careers in Plumbing, HVAC, and Weatherization in Greater Philadelphia Area

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces Additional Apprenticeship Opportunities for Careers in Plumbing, HVAC, and Weatherization in Greater Philadelphia Area SHARE Email Facebook Twitter September 14, 2018center_img Economy,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release,  Workforce Development Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Wolf announced the approval of new funding to expand apprenticeship opportunities in the city of Philadelphia and Delaware County. The two grants, approved for the Pennsylvania Association of Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling Contractors (PAPHCC) and the Energy Coordinating Agency of Philadelphia, underscore the governor’s commitment to increasing job training opportunities for Pennsylvanians through apprenticeships.“In today’s job market, we’re seeing incredible demand for skilled workers in the trades in southeast Pennsylvania and all across the commonwealth,” Governor Wolf said. “This new funding will provide additional opportunities for workers to get the skills they need to land these family-sustaining careers through apprenticeships in plumbing, HVAC, and weatherization.”The first grant, approved for PAPHCC, will provide $297,000 over three years to help offset the cost of tuition expenses paid by students and employers for classroom training required as part of PAPHCC’s apprenticeship program in Aston, Delaware County. The grant will also help provide necessary classroom training technology and materials like smartboards, projectors, printers, shop materials, and books. Support of PAPHCC’s apprenticeship program is critical due to the high turnover of HVAC professionals in southeastern Pennsylvania due to an aging workforce in that field. For instance, the current shortage of qualified plumbers has caused a drastic increase in service fees and construction costs for plumbing work. This funding will support the training of 30 plumbers and HVAC professionals to help address this worker shortage in the region.The second grant, approved for the Energy Coordinating Agency of Philadelphia, will provide $33,000 over two years to increase the skills of Philadelphia’s weatherization workforce through the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Labor’s federally-approved apprenticeship program for home performance technicians. The funding will support the training of five individuals and will be used to offset costs associated with classroom instruction such as instructor pay, books, and exam fees. Classroom training will take place two days per week over two years, giving the students the required 145 hours of classroom instruction required by the apprenticeship program.Apprenticeships are a key component of Governor Wolf’s PAsmart initiative, a new and innovative way to improve coordination between state agencies, cut red tape, and invest in people and business to expand innovative job training in apprenticeships and other programs so workers get the skills they need to compete in the global economy. The $30 million initiative includes $7 million to increase support for apprenticeships, with the goal of doubling the number of registered apprentices by 2025.PAsmart also builds on the Wolf Administration’s Apprenticeship Training Office (ATO) which the administration established in 2016 to support and expand registered apprenticeship programs statewide. Since the ATO was created in early 2016, the office has registered 119 new sponsors and 166 new apprenticeship programs or occupations, bringing the total number of registered apprentices to 16,286 statewide.For more information about the Wolf Administration’s commitment to workforce development, visit the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) website or follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube.last_img read more

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Wisdom Marine Orders Two More Bulkers at Imabari

first_imgTaiwanese shipping company Wisdom Marine has returned to the Japanese shipbuilder Imabari Shipbuilding for two more bulker newbuildings.The company said that it has earmarked around USD 49 million for the two 37,800 dwt bulk carriers.The two ships will be bought for up to USD 24.5 million apiece.The financing will be carried out in installments until the delivery of the ships. However, the exact delivery dates have not been specified.The order comes on the heels of a buying spree from the end of last year which saw Wisdom Marine order two 61,000 dwt bulkers from Tokyo-based builder Kawasaki Heavy Industries and buy a 63,700 dwt bulk carrier from Chijing Shipping.Wisdom Marine kicked off the year by welcoming two newbuilds into the fleet, the 61,950 dwt Amis Miracle, built at Oshima shipyard, and the 37,600 dwt Bunun Kalon, built at Imabari.The latest fleet additions bring the company’s fleet to 126 vessels.Four more newbuildings are set to join Wisdom Marine’s fleet this year, according to the company’s website data.Six additional bulkers, taking shape at Imabari, Namura and Tsuneishi, are set to follow suit in 2019 and 2020.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Sonardyne Rolls Out New Seabed-to-Shore Subsea Tech

first_imgUnderwater technology provider Sonardyne has made new additions to its 2020 product line-up, designed to play a role in delivering data from the seabed to the shore.With a focus on compact unmanned and vessel instruments, Sonardyne has unveiled SPRINT-Nav Mini, said to be the most compact guidance and control solution in the market, as well as ADCP functionality for its Syrinx Doppler velocity log (DVL) and a smaller, lighter version of its popular Gyro USBL transceiver.SPRINT-Nav Mini provides guidance and control outputs – orientation, velocity, altitude and depth – in a single instrument that weighs 0.7 kg in water for the 300 m-rated version.“In replacing the need for three separate instruments; AHRS, DVL and pressure sensors – customers will benefit from reduced cost, less cabling and additional vehicle payload capacity,” Sonardyne said.SPRINT-Nav Mini comes in a 215 mm-high and 149 mm-diameter housing and is also available in a 4,000 m-rated titanium unit of the same size making it ideal for smaller remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).Sonardyne is also introducing its second-generation Gyro USBL. It combines the vessel heading, pitch and roll data that’s critical to Ultra-Short BaseLine (USBL) system performance, with an acoustic transceiver – all in one housing.The new Gyro USBL is now 30% shorter and 40% lighter. That means more vessels, including small vessels of opportunity and unmanned surface vessels, can get the best performance from their USBL using an even easier to handle and install instrument, Sonardyne explains.Finally, Sonardyne has also increased the functionality of its Syrinx 600 kHz DVL. Specifically, Syrinx now has optional acoustic current Doppler profiling (ADCP) capability, as well as dual DVL/ADCP operations, without compromising bottom track. The ADCP data can be viewed and analysed using the new Echo Observer software.“Our customers across the energy, defence and civil markets want to do ever more in the ocean space, increasingly through remote operations,” says Graham Brown, Sonardyne managing director. “We’ve been supporting them every step of the way, from seabed to shore, with smaller and more capable systems. Our latest products and capabilities will further support their goals across an even wider range of assets, from smaller ROVs to small manned and unmanned vessels of opportunity.”last_img read more

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