Chicago Tribune wins Taylor Award

first_img Read Full Story The Chicago Tribune has won the Nieman Foundation’s 2014 Taylor Family Award for Fairness in Journalism with “Red Light Cameras,” a comprehensive series that exposed the corruption and mismanagement of a traffic-monitoring program that has raked in hundreds of millions of dollars from unsuspecting motorists in Chicago over the course of ten years.Two other entries have been selected as finalists for the Taylor Award: “The Truth About Chicago’s Crime Rates” by Chicago Magazine, which revealed efforts by the Chicago Police Department to improve the city’s high crime rate statistics by deliberately underreporting or misclassifying crimes; and “The Longest Road” a three-part series by The Boston Globe’s Jenna Russell that follows the struggles of a young man with mental illness and his mother as they try to cope with the effects of his illness.The Tribune’s “Red Light Cameras” series began in 2012. Reporters David Kidwell and Alex Richards uncovered how the City of Chicago collected money through automated red-light camera fines in a program plagued by lies, deception and schemes. As a result of the reporting, federal authorities issued bribery indictments against the program’s City Hall overseer and others. Mayor Rahm Emanuel fired the vendor, Redflex Traffic Systems, Inc., and his office acknowledged that its own safety claims related to the program were flawed. Emanuel also promised sweeping reforms to a program that has already collected more than $500 million.The Taylor Award will be presented on May 7, 2015 at the Nieman Foundation.last_img read more

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Israel targets flights, religious scofflaws, as virus rages

first_imgJERUSALEM (AP) — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says Israel will be closing its international airport to nearly all flights as the government races to bring a raging coronavirus outbreak under control. The entry of highly contagious variants of the coronavirus, coupled with poor enforcement of safety rules in ultra-Orthodox communities, has contributed to one of the world’s highest rates of infections. It also has threatened to undercut Israel’s highly successful campaign to vaccinate its population against the virus. On Sunday, police clashed with ultra-Orthodox protesters in several cities where residents have resisted lockdown orders.last_img read more

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Kathleen Turner Tapped for Would You Still Love Me If…

first_img Related Shows Would You Still Love Me If… Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 26, 2015 We’re loving this story. Stage and screen icon Kathleen Turner will headline Would You Still Love Me If… off-Broadway after submitting her name to the show’s casting director! According to The New York Times, the two-time Tony nominee had previously been in touch with the production’s playwright, John S. Anastasi, about another project. That didn’t work out, but Turner obviously kept him on her radar!Directed by Nona Gerard, the play will co-star Broadway alum Deborah Cox (a pal of Anastasi’s son-in-law, hence she boarded the project), and will run at New World Stages from September 26. Opening night is scheduled for October 10.Turner is set to take on the role of a mom of a woman considering gender reassignment surgery. She received Tony nods for Who’s Afraid of Virigina Woolf and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, along with an Oscar nomination for Peggy Sue Got Married. Cox will appear as the surgeon and has been seen on the Great White Way in Jekyll & Hyde and Aida.Would You Still Love Me If… will also star Rebecca Brooksher and Sofia Jean Gomez. View Commentslast_img read more

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The Secrets of Snowmaking

first_imgIt’s 10:30 pm when we arrive at Seven Springs Mountain Resort’s mountain operations headquarters. I’m one of a half-dozen group of visiting writers and bloggers, here to get a behind the scenes glimpse at what it takes to make snow. Together, we waddle into the shop like penguins, bracing against the violent wind.Kirk Russell, the Seven Springs Mountain Manager, is there to greet us. His broad build fills the doorframe. Dressed head to toe in Carhartt brown, his cheeks flushed from the constant freeze-thaw cycle of working outdoors, he gives our puffy-clad group a bemused smile.“What, is it cold outside?” he says in that endearing Pittsburghian way, where ‘out’ sounds more like ‘aht’ and the intonation suggests he already knows the answer. He laughs and ushers us inside.AFTER 37 YEARS OF MAKING SNOW AT SEVEN SPRINGS, KIRK RUSSELL IS READY FOR ANYTHING. COURTESY OF SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORTThe shop floor is open and sparse in a utilitarian kind of way with large garage doors and ceilings tall enough to accommodate a couple of snowcats. There’s one parked there now, its engine purring, and we shuffle into the office as it backs out into the darkness of night.“We used to have a wood stove in the shop, but we got rid of it because everyone would sit by it and thaw out and not want to go back outside,” says Russell. “Your coats get frozen to where you can hardly move your arms, like that kid in The Christmas Story. The smart guys take their frozen coats and stand them up outside while they take a break. A frozen coat is warmer than a wet coat.”After 37 years of making snow at Seven Springs, Russell is full of other such anecdotal wisdom, which he dispenses to his crew like a grandfather would his grandchildren. In snowmaking expertise, Russell comes second only to the industry’s godfather, and his own mentor, Herman Dupré.The son of Adolph Dupré, a German immigrant who settled on Seven Springs Farm and opened his property to skiers in the late 1930s, Herman was a master tinkerer. In 1960, Seven Springs installed their own double chairlift and snowmaking system, both of which were Herman Dupré’s designs.Dupré later held 34 patents for his snowmaking systems, and that, in turn, evolved into HKD (for Herman Kress Dupré) Snowmakers, North America’s leading manufacturer of snowmaking technology. The company’s first product, the HKD Standard, was the first snowgun to be used ubiquitously in ski resorts. Now, the HKD SV10 is making its mark as one of the most energy-efficient guns available.Russell knows this because he’s built many of HKD’s guns from the ground up.“They needed someone who could weld, and that’s what got me in the shop,” Russell tells me later on the phone. “That was nice back then, because you weren’t outside freezing. Frostbite is no fun,” but, as Russell says, it comes with the territory. “If you get sprayed in the face with water at five degrees, it pretty much freezes instantly. It doesn’t take long walkin’ around with a frozen face for frostbite to get ya.”IN THE SOUTH, EVERY MINUTE COUNTS WHEN IT COMES TO SNOWMAKING. COURTESY OF CATALOOCHEE SKI AREAOur group trails behind Russell as he heads back outside. The thermometer reads a balmy 20 degrees, but with the wind, it feels well below that. He leads us to a snow gun and, with a few switch flips, brings it roaring to life. A wide jet of snow comes blasting out from the gun. He looks up at it, beaming.“Well don’t just stand there,” he says, turning abruptly back toward the group. “Get up in there and see for yourself.”Hesitantly, I step into the line of fire, er, snow. The force of the gun nearly knocks me down. Russell comes up and tugs at the hood of my jacket.“Don’t want this stuff falling down your neck,” he says, “although it does pack a better punch than coffee. Just look at how it brushes right off your jacket. This is the good stuff.”It’s light and fluffy and beautiful and I tell him as much, but my cheeks are starting to lose feeling. I step back out of the blast, but Russell stays put. Over the snow gun’s grumble, unfazed by its arctic squall, he launches into an impressively thorough summary of Seven Springs’ snowmaking operations: how the resort stores water in 40 collection ponds on the property including the main “stomach” Lake Tahoe; how the water is pumped from Lake Tahoe to the snow guns at a rate of almost 20,000 gallons of water per minute; that the resort’s 1,200 snow guns use less than 20 cubic feet of air per minute (cfm); that it takes 200,000 gallons of water to cover an acre of ground in one foot of snow; how over the course of the winter, the resort will use 350 million gallons of water and drain Lake Tahoe at least three times.Shivering, trying desperately to absorb the facts, I can’t help but fixate on Russell’s total nonchalance of the elements. Small mounds of snow have accumulated on his shoulders, his beard a literal ice cube. I’m cold just looking at him.“Aren’t you freezing?” I finally ask.“Oh, once you build a layer of ice on ya, it insulates you to the point where you do stay warm.” Still, he admits, it’s not easy being out on the mountain all hours of the night in the middle of winter. “It’s hard to get people who are willing to do this type of work.”[nextpage title=”Read on!”]Philip Fuchs, Assistant Mountain Manager at Cataloochee Ski Area in Maggie Valley, N.C., knows the feeling. Fuchs has been at the resort for 18 years, and he says of all of the hurdles southern resorts face, finding reliable snowmaking employees is one of the biggest.“If I’m just pulling an application out of the file and doing interviews, I’ve brought plenty of people on like that, straight off the street, but they usually make it about two weeks,” says Fuchs.Between constant exposure to the cold and long 12-hour shifts, usually from 6pm to 6am when temperatures are coldest, making snow is hard, often thankless work. But as the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic continue to have record warm winters, snowmaking is more important now than ever before. Cataloochee depends on snowmaking to provide 90% of the mountain’s snow. Farther west, Tennessee’s Ober Gatlinburg, which sits between 2,700 and 3,300 feet in elevation, relies on snowmaking to provide over 95% of its snow base.“There’s no snow, there’s no skiing,” says Fuchs. “We need to have the most firepower on the hill to put as much snow on the ground as possible in the least amount of time,” and that, he says, takes one thing: money.SEVEN SPRINGS’ PORTABLE SNOW GUNS ALLOW KIRK RUSSELL AND HIS SNOWMAKING TEAM TO MOVE THE SNOW WHEN THEY NEED IT, WHERE THEY NEED IT. COURTESY OF SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORTThe Economics of SnowIn 2015, RRC Associates, a research firm contracted by the National Ski Areas Association, released an economic impact study on North Carolina’s ski industry. Its report found that the 2014-2015 ski season brought $197.2 million to the state, a 35.1 percent increase compared to the 2009-2010 season ($145.9 million).The findings came as a welcome surprise. That same year, skiing nationwide was down by 5%. The Southeast ski scene, too, was down by 1.4%, but North Carolina’s was up a whopping 7.5%. There’s a two-fold answer as to why North Carolina’s skiing has seen such startling growth while other naturally snowier states are struggling. North Carolina resorts see a younger, more novice audience, largely due to the fact that the Southeast is the fastest growing region in the nation. But more importantly, North Carolina’s resorts have prioritized reinvesting profits back into the property, which means nicer facilities, better snow, and an increased likelihood that those beginner skiers will return again.Because North Carolina does not receive as much natural snowfall as other states, resorts have been forced out of necessity to upgrade their snowmaking equipment in order to stay competitive. Cataloochee’s President Chris Bates recognized this necessary evil early on in his tenure, and in 2005, the resort automated nearly all of the snow guns on the mountain.“When I first started here 18 years ago, our snowmaking system was probably about one-third of what it is today,” he says. “We only had two lifts at that time, where now we have three. We had about 10 trails and we ski on 18 now. We were only skiing 80 to 90 days a season, where now we’re averaging around 130 days of skiing every year.”That total overhaul, which involved purchasing 110 snowmaking machines and replacing many of the resort’s air and water lines, wasn’t cheap. Over the course of five years, Bates estimates that Cataloochee spent about $15 million in snowmaking upgrades alone. And it doesn’t stop there. Although most tower guns could last up to 30 years with minimum maintenance required, snowmaking technology is improving at such a rapid rate that those guns become antiquated well before then. Cataloochee’s snow guns are only 13 years old, and Bates says the resort is again in the process of updating that machinery.“In the last two years we’ve already replaced about one-third of that equipment and we’ll continue to do that because the new stuff is just a step better than what we had before,” he says. “Our investment in the equipment is 100% responsible for extending our season close to double what it was.”The Future of SnowmakingThe equipment that Cataloochee has so wisely invested in is proof alone that the snowmaking industry is continuing to evolve in response to the pressures of climate change. While water is certainly a heavily used resource in the snowmaking process, over 80% of that water is returned to the resort’s holding ponds once it melts off of the slopes. The water is pumped, filtered, and recycled again for snowmaking use. Unlike resorts in arid, drier states out west, most Southeastern resorts can rely on rain to account for that 20% lost to evaporation.It’s air, not water, which presents the biggest problem. Compressed air requires a lot of energy, which is why resorts are switching to automated snow guns that use substantially less compressed air than older models. Early snow guns used anywhere from 450 to 1,000cfm, where newer guns use anywhere from 20 to 140cfm. That means resorts can run more guns and make more snow with less energy.“The guns with automation really let you get your product out there a lot quicker,” says Ober Gatlinburg’s Nighttime Snowmaking Supervisor Charlie Godwin. “You can turn on 100 guns within minutes, whereas if you have guys out there on the mountain turning [the guns] on manually, it could take them anywhere from three to five hours. Here in the South, every minute counts.”Ober recently purchased a SnowMagic unit that can crank out 150 tons of snow in 24 hours, even when it’s 65 degrees and sunny. When I spoke to Godwin in October, he had already been running the 150-ton unit, plus three smaller 50-ton SnowMagic units that the resort is leasing, for two weeks.It’s not the most affordable or efficient route to go: the 150-ton unit costs upwards of $400,000, compared to the average $45,000 fully automated snow gun, and covering an entire ski run in snow would require an inordinate amount of energy—that one machine uses 400 kilowatts per hour and 32 gallons of water per minute. At the very least, the combined units do allow Ober to open up its tubing park before Thanksgiving, and as Godwin says, every minute counts.Back at Seven Springs, and in the warmth of the shop, I ask Kirk Russell what the next chapter holds for snowmaking. The industry has come a long way since the days of diesel air compressors chugging 15 gallons of fuel an hour. Still, as global warming continues to manifest itself in the form of droughts and above-average temperatures, can resorts keep up?The best snow guns on the market already have their own weather stations, which allow snowmakers to make the most out of optimal conditions, if only for a few hours. Though Ober, Cataloochee, and Seven Springs all depend on the grid, progressive-minded resorts like Mount Abram up in Maine are increasing sustainability measures by installing solar panels in parking lots to supplement energy usage. Ski resorts everywhere are looking to diversification (most notably in the form of downhill mountain biking) to relieve pressure on the ski season to provide.If resorts can achieve that optimum trifecta of maintaining reliable snowmaking staff, continuing to invest in energy saving equipment, and expanding off-season activities on the mountain, Russell thinks that, yes, resorts can keep up, “but it’s not going to happen overnight.”last_img read more

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Man Utd star Paul Pogba supported Arsenal and idolised Thierry Henry

first_img Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 14 Apr 2020 11:40 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Comment Man Utd star Paul Pogba supported Arsenal and idolised Thierry Henry Paul Pogba idolised Arsenal legend Thierry Henry when he was a youngster (Picture: Getty)Paul Pogba has confessed he grew up supporting Arsenal and idolised the club’s record goalscorer Thierry Henry. The World Cup winner joined United’s academy from Le Havre in 2009 having grown up dreaming of representing the north London club who, under the management of Arsene Wenger, boasted some of the best French players to have ever played in the Premier League.Appearing on the UTD podcast, Pogba admitted: ‘I had posters of Ronaldinho, Ronaldo, Zidane, Thierry Henry, Djibril Cisse, Kaka. ‘Yeah, so I will be honest I was an Arsenal fan, obviously because of all the French players. My other brother was a Man Utd fan and couldn’t say anything. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I used to really love Thierry Henry so I would say because of him I was an Arsenal fan. Then I changed then I went to choose to stay with my other brother who was a United fan.’ Paul Pogba has been restricted to just eight appearances this season due to an ankle injury, one of which came against Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Asked to expand on his admiration for Henry, Pogba revealed he began his fledgling career as a forward, before he was instructed to move into a midfield role he has starred for United, Juventus and the France national team.He added: ‘I started as a striker then No.10 then No.6. Thank God they didn’t make me a centre back. I wanted to touch the ball so much. ‘I was a striker and I was dribbling too much. One coach told me play No.10 so you can touch the ball more. I took still too many touches so he put me No.6.’ Pogba has been linked with a summer move and a potential return to Juventus, while Real Madrid maintain a long-standing interest in the 27-year-old.More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errorsThe United midfielder has, however, been out of action since Boxing Day following an ankle injury which required surgery, but Pogba his hopeful of mounting an imminent comeback once domestic football is back on the agenda. He said: ‘I had a foot injury, which came in the game against Southampton. It was early this season and so I carried this for a long time, training and trying to be playing with it. After I stopped, I found I had a fracture. ‘I had a cast on it, a plaster-cast, so it went very well but too well. The bone got bigger and so, when I came back again, I played those two games against Watford and Newcastle, I could feel something again. So I had to have an operation and now here I am. I don’t feel anything and, hopefully, I’ll be back very soon.’MORE: Graeme Souness responds to Paul Pogba’s jibe as Jamie Carragher slams Manchester United starMORE: Manchester United’s Paul Pogba explains what he learned from Paul Scholes and Andrea PirloRead the latest updates: Coronavirus news live Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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Israel-Egypt gas pipeline transaction set for completion

first_imgU.S. company Noble Energy and Israel’s Delek, and Egypt’s EGAS are nearing the completion of the acquisition of a gas pipeline linking Israel and Egypt, which will serve as a transport route for gas from Israel’s Tamar and Leviathan offshore gas fields to Egypt.The group in September last year agreed to buy the stake in the East Mediterranean Gas company registered in Egypt which owns a 26 inch, c. 90 km subsea pipeline – the EMG Pipeline – connecting the Israeli transmission system in the Ashkelon area with the Egyptian transmission system in the El-Arish area, as well as related facilities. The transaction value was set at $518 million.The pipeline was designed for a capacity of approx. 7 BCM per year, with an option to increase the capacity to approximately 9 BCM per year by installing additional systems.The flow of gas through the EMG Pipeline from Egypt to Israel was stopped several years ago, has no commercial activity. This is soon about to change as Delek on Sunday said all conditions have been met to complete the EMG transaction and the full amount to be paid has been transferred to the escrow agents. Also, the purchased EMG shares were transferred to EMED, a company jointly owned by Noble, Delek, and EGAS.“Upon the transfer of the full amount of the consideration from the escrow agents to the sellers, which is expected to be performed in the coming days, the EMG transaction will be closed,” Delek said Sunday.Related: GALLERY: Heerema’s crane vessel Sleipnir in record-breaking Leviathan liftDelek has estimated that the EMG Pipeline and the Egyptian transmission system will be fit for the commercial transport of gas on the date of start of the obligation of the Leviathan field partners to supply natural gas as agreed with Egypt’s Dolphinus.To remind, partners in Noble Energy-operated Leviathan and Tamar gas fields offshore Israel have recently signed revised agreements for the supply of gas to Egypt’s Dolphinus Energy, whereby the Egyptian company agreed to buy more than 85 BCM of gas from the Leviathan and Tamar partners.Under the amended agreement, signed on September 26, Dolphinus will buy around 60 BCM of natural gas from the Leviathan field. This is a significant increase compared to 32 BCM stipulated under the original agreement.The Leviathan gas supply to Dolphinus will start on January 1, 2020, and will continue until December 31, 2034, or until the supply of the full contractual quantity, whichever is earlier. The giant gas field is expected to start production later this year.While the volume of gas to be sold from the Leviathan to Dolphinus has increased, the Tamar volumes have been reduced from the original agreements signed last year. Under the revised deal, Dolphinus will buy 25,3BCM, down from 32,3 BCM envisioned by the original agreement. Tamar partners will supply gas to Dolphinus starting June 30, 2020, until December 31, 2034.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email.Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form, where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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Coronavirus slashes volumes at LA, Long Beach ports

first_img“With U.S. retailers and cargo owners scaling back orders, volumes are soft even though factories in China are beginning to produce more. Amidst this public health crisis, there will be uncertain months ahead in the global supply chain.” “The coronavirus is delivering a shock to the supply chain that continues to ripple across the national economy,” said Mario Cordero, Executive Director of the Port of Long Beach. The port said that its March cargo volumes reached 449,568 TEUs marking a 30.9 % fall year-on-year and a drop to the lowest monthly cargo level since February 2009. The Port of Los Angeles remains open with all terminals operational during the COVID-19 pandemic and serves as the temporary homeport of the naval hospital ship USNS Mercy.  The port moved 517,663 TEUs last month, a 6.4% decline compared to March 2019.  Imports were down 5% to 234,570 TEUs, while exports increased 10.7% to 145,442 TEUs. Empty containers shipped overseas dropped 21% to 137,652 TEUs. “We’ve had two serious shocks to our supply chain system. First the trade war between the U.S. and China and now the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Gene Seroka, Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles. The cargo volumes at the Port of Los Angeles, the number one container port in the United States, have plummeted due to the shock wave the coronavirus pandemic has sent throughout the global supply chains. Flickr/Terez Sanogo under public domain license The Port of Long Beach, the second busiest container port in the U.S., has also felt the economic strain caused by the increasing number of blank sailings. Overseas health concerns over the coronavirus caused 19 canceled sailings to the Port of Long Beach during the opening quarter of 2020, which contributed to a 6.9% decline in cargo shipments compared to the first three months of 2019, the port said. For the first quarter of 2020, volumes at the port have decreased by 18.5% compared to 2019.  The port said that its officials are in regular contact with terminal operators, longshore unions, and other supply chain stakeholders to make sure that stakeholders are able to obtain the necessary supplies they need for a safe and clean work environment. “We’re definitely seeing a reduction in the flow of cargo at San Pedro Bay, but the ports remain open and operating, and we are maintaining business continuity.”last_img read more

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Same sex marriage unfair to hookers and bigamists

first_imgHerald Sun 7 November 2013Marriage is  fundamentally a tradition meant to gently bind parents to their responsibilities, especially to their children. But many same sex marriage advocates have redefined it into a mere symbol of recognition – to be allowed to marry is to be approved of.This is not at all what marriage is for, and there is no telling what absurdities this yammer will lead to.Well, actually there is.   Now academic Annamarie Jagose claims that  gay marriage is bad because it will just further oppress the already marginalised, who will be denied the esteem they deserve, tooTherefore, the recognition of same-sex couples through marriage is not a wholly benign or even a neutral act because, like the historic form of marriage itself, it recognises the worth of some relationships by valuing them more than others. “Outside the newly enlarged circle of social approval and privilege afforded by same-sex marriage stand those whose erotic lives are not organised around the values symbolised by marriage: coupledom, monogamy, permanence, domestic cohabitation. Unmarried mothers, for instance; adulterers; the devotedly promiscuous; sex workers; the divorced; the bigamous and polygamous; those who are not strangers to the august traditions of the dirty weekend or the one-night stand; single people. Now this ragtag bunch might not seem as worthy of social protection and prestige as the loving, caring, long-term gay and lesbian couples that are the shiny new poster boys and girls for same-sex marriage. But it reminds us to ask something that advocates of same-sex marriage, in their eagerness, forget to ask: why should marriage continue in the 21st century to be a primary mechanism for the distribution of social recognition and privilege?”http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/same_sex_marriage_mean_to_hookers/last_img read more

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CARICOM heads to hear about regional corruption

first_img Tweet Share Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad — Trinidad and Tobago Prime Minister, Kamla Persad Bissessar, who is the head of regional security for the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), said she intends to bring allegations of corruption at the CARICOM Implementation Agency for Crime and Security (IMPACS) to the attention of other member states in order to institute an audit at the agency.The Sunday Express newspaper reported that Persad Bissessar made the statement in an email, in response to a request for a comment on the allegations.The prime minister said, “Should the allegations be true, it is indeed cause for grave concern. Corruption of any kind is a cancer eating away at the heart of every person who should benefit from projects, since every dollar corruptly taken means one dollar less for the benefit of people; and it would be even more appalling for an organisation charged with responsibility for assisting in the fight against crime to, itself, be ensnared in criminal activity.”“In the circumstances, I will bring same (allegations) to the attention of CARICOM heads and request that a full investigation be undertaken, including an audit, and for steps to be taken for transparency and accountability,” Persad Bissessar stated.by Global News StaffCaribbean News Now 17 Views   no discussions NewsRegional CARICOM heads to hear about regional corruption by: – April 18, 2011last_img read more

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Weekend motorcycle crash kills one in Franklin County

first_imgFranklin County, In. — Franklin County Sheriff’s deputies say loose gravel caused a fatal motorcycle accident on State Road 252 east of Little Cedar Road.Saturday at 2:46 p.m. a motorcycle riden by Jeffery Dethlefs, 51, of Cincinnati, was westbound on State Road 252 when he hit loose gravel and lost control. The Bike went off the north side of the road, over an embankment and struck an electric fence.Dethlefs and his 15-year-old female passenger were thrown from the bike. Dethlefs was pronounced dead at the scene. The 15-year-old was flown to University Hospital in Cincinnati.last_img read more

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