TPO expels five estate agents, but four have already stopped trading!

first_imgThe Property Ombudsman has revealed the latest clutch of estate agents to be expelled from its scheme but, out of the five businesses, only one is still trading.Four of the businesses given the ultimate sanction by TPO – and expelled – threw in the towel months ago and have closed down or disappeared.In the five cases, the sometimes shocking stories of poor customer service and negligence by the firms included deposits not being placed within an authorised deposit protection scheme, not passing on rent quickly enough, destroying a landlords property by mistake and refusing to return a sales reservation fee on a property.DMF Inventories Ltd, Shenley Wood, Milton KeynesAward not paid: £1,677DMF failed to register a landlord’s deposit with the DPS. When the Management Agreement came to an end, DMF also failed to release the tenant’s deposit of £1,377 to enable the landlord to register it.Following the formal complaint to TPO, no response was received.The Ombudsman made an award of £1,677, (£1377 for the tenant’s deposit and £300 compensation). DMF advised they could not make the full payment and suggested a payment plan, but their accountant then confirmed they could not afford any payment at all.Chebar Homes Ltd, Deptford, LondonAward not paid: £1,566Several landlords made a formal complaint to The Property Ombudsman about the company’s handling of both rent payments and complaints.Upon investigation, the agent did not dispute that they had failed to pass on most of the rent in a timely manner and that the landlords were owed one month’s rent, minus commission. The Ombudsman supported the complaint.An award for £1,556 was made, but Chebar Homes failed to pay the award and the TPO’s Compliance Committee ruled it should be expelled.Plush Lettings, Llanlelli, CarmarthenshireAward not paid: £2,000A landlord complained that the agency did not ensure that his property was secure after they visited it and that they had destroyed belongings in a garage worth £8,743 after mis-reading an email.The Ombudsman could not work out the true valuation of what was disposed of and therefore proposed a compensatory award of £1,850 in respect of these with an additional award of £150 for the aggravation, distress and inconvenience.Plush failed to pay the award and was expelled from The Property Ombudsman scheme. It appears to still be trading on its website, active accounts with both Zoopla and OntheMarket and registration with Rent Smart Wales. Rent Smart Wales has been informed.Estateducation, NorwichAward not paid: £375This ‘bespoke property investing development company’ has been expelled for owing an award of £375 to a prospective buyer.The company has told TPO it ‘welcomes’ court proceedings and does not believe it requires redress as a ‘developer’.The complainant viewed an off-plan property on Rightmove, marketed by Estateducation.After initial enquiries, he was persuaded to pay the company a £500 Reservation Fee on the basis that he would buy the property under the Right to Buy Scheme, as advertised, and exchange sale contracts within six weeks.The buyer decided to withdraw after it felt the handling of an application for a Help to Buy loan on their behalf had been poor and withdrew from the purchase.The Ombudsman considered it reasonable for Estateducation to pay the buyer £375.Concept Lettings Ltd, ReadingAward not paid: £4,704This dispute arose when a landlord instructed the agency on tenant find only basis and, after the tenant moved in but then stopped paying rent and had to be convicted, complained to TPO about the poor referencing of the tenant and their guarantor.The complaint was supported as the agent had not sought to verify the identification of the tenant’s guarantor which, had they done so, would have established that the signature on the form had been forged.The Ombudsman considered that the referencing was reckless as there was simply not enough information to determine whether the tenant or the guarantor could afford to pay the rent and the results of the referencing provider’s credit score checks could not reasonably be relied on.Read more about TPO.The Property Ombudaman expelled by TPO February 21, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » TPO expels five estate agents, but four have already stopped trading! previous nextAgencies & PeopleTPO expels five estate agents, but four have already stopped trading!Agents in Milton Keynes, London, Llanelli, Norwich and Reading all failed to pay awards to customers and have been kicked out by TPO.Sheila Manchester21st February 202001,830 Viewslast_img read more

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USS Hartford Gets New Commander

first_img June 23, 2014 USS Hartford Gets New Commander View post tag: gets View post tag: Navy Share this article View post tag: Naval View post tag: Commander Authorities View post tag: New Cmdr. Thomas Aydt relieved Cmdr. Steven Wilkinson as Hartford’s commanding officer during a pierside ceremony.Wilkinson assumed command in October 2011 and led Hartford during a successful six-month deployment to the U.S. European Command region of operations the following year.Wilkinson was also credited with providing inspirational leadership that enabled Hartford’s crew of 16 officers and 127 enlisted members to excel.Last July, the U.S. Fleet Forces Command presented Hartford with the prestigious Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy, which recognized the submarine as Atlantic Fleet’s most improved navy vessel in 2012.Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert stated in a May 2013 message that Hartford “consistently and measurably improved in every warfare area and achieved on-time certification for one of [Commander, Submarine Forces] most challenging deployments.”The Washington state native’s next assignment is scheduled to be closer to home. He will report to Submarine Development Squadron 5 based in Bangor, Wash., after briefly serving as a deputy commander for Submarine Squadron 4 in Groton.Aydt, an Illinois native, reports to Groton after finishing a shore tour at Submarine Force U.S. Pacific Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.Aydt enlisted in the Navy in 1988 and served as a missile technician aboard ballistic missile submarines before entering an enlisted commissioning program in 1995.He later received his officer commission after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Jacksonville University. He also has a master’s in operations management from the University of Arkansas.USS Hartford was commissioned Dec. 10, 1994 and is the second U.S. naval vessel named in honor of Connecticut’s capital city.[mappress]Press Release, June 23, 2014; Image: US Navy View post tag: News by topic View post tag: americas Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Hartford Gets New Commander View post tag: USS Hartford Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) received a new commander June 20 during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn.last_img read more

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Governor gives stores 60 days to pull marijuana-derived oil

first_imgIndiana Gov. Eric Holcomb is directing state excise police to resume checking stores for marijuana-derived oils after the state’s attorney general declared them illegal with one limited exception.Holcomb said in a statement Tuesday that excise police will “perform normal, periodic regulatory spot checks” of cannabidiol, or CBD, products. He says those checks will focus on products that contain THC, the psychoactive chemical in marijuana.The Indianapolis Star reported stores have 60 days to pull the products from their shelves.The recent opinion from Attorney General Curtis Hill states that substances containing CBD are illegal to possess, make and sell in Indiana under state and federal law. The opinion said the exception is CBD products that can be used by people with epilepsy who are on a new state registry. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Light worsens migraine headaches

first_img“This explains the throbbing headache and accompanying scalp and neck-muscletenderness experienced by many migraine patients,” said the study’s seniorauthor, Rami Burstein, a Harvard Medical School professor of anesthesia and critical care medicine atBIDMC.In addition, for reasons that have been unknown, nearly 85 percent of migrainepatients are also extremely sensitive to light, a condition known asphotophobia.“Migraine patients may wear sunglasses, even at night,” he said, adding thatthe dimmest of light can make migraine pain worse. Extremely disabling,photophobia can prevent patients from such routine activities as reading,writing, working, or driving.It was the observation that even blind individuals who suffer from migraineswere experiencing photophobia that led Burstein and first author Rodrigo Nosedato hypothesize that signals transmitted from the retina via the optic nervewere somehow triggering the intensification of pain.The investigators studied two groups of blind individuals who suffer migraines.Patients in the first group were totally blind due to eye diseases such asretinal cancer and glaucoma; they were unable to see images or to sense light,and therefore could not maintain normal sleep-wake cycles. Patients in thesecond group were legally blind due to retinal degenerative diseases such asretinitis pigmentosa; although they were unable to perceive images, they coulddetect the presence of light and maintain normal sleep-wake cycles.“While the patients in the first group did not experience any worsening oftheir headaches from light exposure, the patients in the second group clearlydescribed intensified pain when they were exposed to light, in particular blueor gray wavelengths,” said Burstein. “This suggested to us that the mechanismof photophobia must involve the optic nerve, because in totally blindindividuals, the optic nerve does not carry light signals to the brain.“We also suspected that a group of recently discovered retinal cells containingmelanopsin photoreceptors [which help control biological functions includingsleep and wakefulness] is critically involved in this process, because theseare the only functioning light receptors among patients who are legally blind.”The scientists took these ideas to the laboratory, where they performed aseries of experiments in “an animal model” of migraine. After injecting dyesinto the eye, they traced the path of the melanopsin retinal cells through theoptic nerve to the brain, where they found a group of neurons that becomeelectrically active during migraine.“When small electrodes were inserted into these ‘migraine neurons,’ wediscovered that light was triggering a flow of electrical signals that wasconverging on these very cells,” said Burstein. “This increased their activitywithin seconds.”And even when the light was removed, he said, these neurons remained activated.“This helps explain why patients say that their headache intensifies withinseconds after exposure to light, and improves 20 to 30 minutes after being inthe dark.” Thediscovery ofthis pathway provides scientists with a new avenue to follow in working toaddress the problem of photophobia.“Clinically, this research sets the stage for identifying ways to block thepathway so that migraine patients can endure light without pain,” saidBurstein.In addition to Noseda and Burstein, co-authors include BIDMC investigatorsVanessa Kainz, Moshe Jakubowski, Joshua Gooley, and Clifford B. Saper, alongwith Kathleen Digre of the University of Utah. The study was funded by grantsfrom the National Institutes of Health and from Research to Prevent Blindness. Normal0017014001338491311.1282000Askpeople who suffer from migraine headaches what they do when they’re having attacks,and you’re likely to hear “go into a dark room.” Although it’s long been knownthat light makes migraines worse, the reason why has been unclear. NowHarvard scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have identified a visualpathway that underlies sensitivity to light during migraines. Thefindings, which were published in yesterday’s advance online issue of NatureNeuroscience, help to explain the mechanism behind this widespread condition.The research involved blind individuals and those with normal eyesight. Amigraine is a one-sided, throbbing headache associated with a number ofsymptoms, including nausea, vomiting, and fatigue. Migraines are notoriouslydebilitating and surprisingly widespread, affecting more than 30 million peoplein the United States alone. Migraine pain is believed to develop when themeninges, the system of membranes surrounding the brain and central nervoussystem, become irritated, which stimulates pain receptors and triggers a seriesof events that lead to the prolonged activation of groups of sensory neurons.last_img read more

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Nobel in chemistry awarded to Martin Karplus

first_imgMartin Karplus, the Theodore William Richards Professor of Chemistry Emeritus in Harvard’s Department of  Chemistry and Chemical Biology is one of three to share in the Nobel Prize in chemistry, the The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced this morning.The Nobel Prize in chemistry 2013 was awarded jointly to Karplus, A.B. ’51, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems,” according to the Nobel committee.With Karplus’ award, 47 current and former Harvard faculty members have been recipients of Nobel Prizes for wide-ranging work, including the tissue culture breakthrough that led to the creation of the polio vaccine, negotiations that led to an armistice in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the first description of the structure of DNA, poetry, pioneering procedures for organ transplants, the development of Gross National Product as a measure of national economic change, and much more.In 2012, Alvin E. Roth, a Harvard economist whose practical applications of mathematical theories have transformed markets ranging from public school assignments to kidney donations to medical resident job placements, won the Nobel economics prize.Prior to that, in 2009, Jack Szostak, a genetics professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital, won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. Szostak’s work not only revealed a key cellular function, but also illuminated processes involved in disease and aging.In 2007, economist Eric S. Maskin ’72, Ph.D. ’76, the Adams Professor at Harvard, received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics “for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory.” Among other applications, that theory has helped economists identify socially valuable trading mechanisms, regulation schemes, and voting procedures.In 2005, physicist Roy Glauber won for his work on the nature and behavior of light, and Thomas Schelling won in economics for work on conflict and cooperation in game theory. Previous winners in the past decade include Linda Buck in physiology or medicine in 2004, Riccardo Giacconi in physics in 2002, and A. Michael Spence in economics in 2001.last_img read more

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Falling fertility rates

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiKYU07QqPI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/XiKYU07QqPI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> In the 1960s, scholar Paul R. Ehrlich warned that a looming global population explosion would usher in mass starvation and death by the end of the 20th century.If recent data are any indication, Ehrlich’s fears may have been somewhat misplaced. For the past several decades, fertility rates have steadily declined around the world. But many analysts agree that those falling figures are tied to another set of problems.According to the experts, parts of the world are facing a new “demographic time bomb,” one that threatens skyrocketing health care and pension costs as populations age. The threat also could undermine the economies of many nations by robbing them of young, homegrown workers entering the labor force.“It was really a shocking realization that this was happening,” said Mary Brinton, Radcliffe Hrdy Fellow and chair of Harvard’s sociology department. For the past several years, Brinton and a team of collaborators that includes several Harvard students, have explored declining fertility rates in postindustrial societies, in work partly funded by the National Science Foundation.Brinton researches countries in Southern Europe and East Asia where birthrates average 1.5 or below. (Demographers argue that countries need to maintain a 2.1 birthrate — the number of children born to each woman as an average — to replace their populations without help from immigration.)What’s behind this decline? According to Brinton, the complicated problem involves several factors, led by economic forces and entrenched attitudes about women in the workforce and as mothers.During a year at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Brinton and her team continued analyzing the results of 400 in-depth interviews with men and women in their late 20s and early 30s in Japan, Sweden, Spain, South Korea, and the United States. The comparative study focused on 80 respondents in each country who completed some form of education after high school.Using the same questions and a restricted sample allowed the team to make “sensible comparisons across countries,” said Brinton. The lengthy interviews also allowed them to explore “the reasoning that different people are using, so that we can really understand how people are thinking about their lives at critical junctures in young adulthood.”Interviewers asked respondents about their attitudes toward work, marriage, family, and children, and more nuanced questions about gender roles, including queries such as “Should mothers work outside the home?” and “Do men make better business executives than women?”The responses revealed that Japan and South Korea’s similar attitudes about gender norms are likely helping keep birthrates there low. In those societies, the prevailing cultural norms hold that women should leave their jobs when it’s time to have children, while their husbands should continue as breadwinners with little responsibility for household work or child care.Sixty percent of women in Japan quit the labor force by the time they have their first child, said Brinton, “and that hasn’t budged in 20 years.” As increasing numbers of well-educated women enter the workforce, “Something has got to give,” she said. “What gives in Japan is that a lot of women don’t get married and have kids, but instead have careers. It’s either/or.”In Spain, Brinton and her colleagues noticed that while husbands tend to have more flexible attitudes toward helping with child care and household chores, allowing women to work more, the country’s struggling economy is most likely the biggest factor driving birthrates down.“I see much more negotiation and discussion between the sexes about who’s going to do how much housework and how the child care is going to be arranged — more openness, more flexibility,” said Brinton. “The big bottleneck seems to be that unemployment is heavily concentrated among young people. With such economic uncertainty, they are just scared to go ahead and have families, worried about whether they can support them.”In contrast, birthrates are holding up in Sweden, where interview responses indicated that strong government support for public child care and generous parental leave options make mixing work and family much easier for young couples raising children than in most other countries.Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, the fertility rate in the United States, where state support for caregiving lags well behind the Swedish model, also remains fairly steady. In the American responses, Brinton found a strong belief in family and a desire to juggle a career and children successfully, no matter what. Free from the rigid gender strictures in countries such as Japan and South Korea, parents in the United States can “fashion the way they want to live without tremendous social sanctions,” said Brinton. But their desire to work hard and be good, caring parents often clashes with inflexible hours at work.“People who are happiest in the U.S. are the ones who have some flexibility in their working hours. But it’s up to you to solve those problems with your employer. You have to negotiate every piece of it.”One advantage for workers in the United Sates is their ability to switch jobs to find a better work-life balance. American workers with good educations and strong skill sets often have the option of changing jobs or even careers, said Brinton.“In Japan, we are not hearing in the interviews, ‘If I can’t figure this out with my employer, I will try to find another job.’ People don’t say that very much because it’s much less possible.“The United States is an incredibly mobile society,” she added. “We are always trying to figure things out and see how to move on.”last_img read more

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Thinner, More Powerful, Literally Cooler, XPS 15 Systems

first_imgMother Nature may have played an April Fool’s joke on the northern U.S. by covering them in snow two weeks after spring officially began, but the new products blooming here at Dell today are all for real.The new assortment of systems we launched highlight our commitment to creating devices that prioritize performance and smart design, and they build on our partner Intel’s new 8th Gen Intel Core processor.“Dell did not waste any time utilizing the new CPUs, as it has gone and revamped several of its product lines,” noted Hot Hardware.Yes, our engineers worked to extract maximum performance from Intel’s new, top-of-the-line processors. And, if you really want to dig into the many different aspects of Intel’s processor strategy announced today, AnandTech has an in-depth post.But there are other design innovations now available that go beyond processing power. In a try-it-before-you-can-buy-it moment at CES 2018, we shared that the new XPS 15 2-in-1 would have a maglev keyboard design.“The keyboard mechanism is similar to the Maglev trains at various airports,” Deccan Chronicle noted at that time. “The keys are held together physically but they ‘float’ magnetically.”Development Manager Kevin Turchin explains it a bit more in this new video:Power efficient, designed with smarter materials, sustainably packaged and recycle-friendly, the XPS 15 2-in-1 is also one of our most environmentally sensitive products. It includes our Ocean Plastics Packaging — plastic trash that’s been recovered from waterways and remade into useful materials.The innovative maglev keyboard design mimics the feel and travel of a standard keyboard in a thinner design. While going thinner, the XPS 15 2-in-1 designers also found a way to lower the temperature of the system to enable greater performance using GORE™ Thermal Insulation.Perhaps these new ways of approaching the design are why it was also recently called our version of a concept car by Digital Trends’ Luke Larsen.“For Dell, it isn’t just a 2-in-1 version of the XPS 15 — it’s a way of experimenting with future technology without having to sacrifice the familiarity of its premium laptop line,” Larsen said.“got to check out the amazing work @azorfrank and @dono1528 are doing with the XPS line at Dell a few weeks ago. here’s the first of my reports on the kind of innovation they’re working up: https://t.co/Hjt7PWeSOP“— Luke Larsen (@lalarsen11) April 2, 2018ShareLarsen also noted that from the outside, you might not be able to tell the XPS 15 2-in-1 from the non-convertible XPS 15. The new Coffee Lake version of that smallest 15.6” performance laptop (and the only InfinityEdge display in a 15”) will be available for pre-order later this month.“Despite being more compact, Dell says it can hit up to 21.5 hours of battery life. That will naturally depend on your components and what you’re doing. Still, even if it’s a few hours shy of that mark with normal use, it still be a lot of time away from a charging cable,” said Cnet.Gordon Mah Ung, executive editor at PCWorld was impressed with the number of cores we’ve been able to squeeze into the XPS 15 because it means faster video encoding and faster photo editing.“Know why the MacBook Pro 15 is so thin? It’s because of all the times Dell’s powerhouse XPS 15 has stomped on it,” he joked. “Yes, that’s a cheap shot, but it’s been mostly true—and Apple’s beatdown will only get worse as the newest XPS 15 (model 9570) ups the ante to a 6-core, 12-thread Core i7-8750H.”last_img read more

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ND lights up Ugandan towns

first_imgNotre Dame’s Initiative for Global Development (IGD) is teaming up with Accenture, a global management consulting company, to provide electricity to rural communities in northern Uganda in hopes of giving them the ability to start their own enterprises. Many locations in Uganda have spotty electricity, a fact reflected in the country’s low gross domestic product (GDP), IGD program director Patrick Murphy said. Murphy said Notre Dame and Accenture hope that by providing working electricity, the residents of the country will have the opportunity to form more enterprises, thereby creating jobs in the area. “It’s about electricity, Internet connectivity and training for displaced persons in Uganda with the intent of generating new jobs built upon the new entrepreneurs that are trained,” Murphy said. “What’s lacking to try to start a new enterprise now is reliable electricity.” Murphy, former managing director for the Center for Sustainable Energy, said Accenture, through their Skills to Succeed program, aims to equip 250,000 people worldwide with the training to start a business. IGD pitched the idea of providing rural Africa with electricity to the company and formed a partnership, he said. The pilot program will work to provide electricity to three initial sites in Uganda, Murphy said. “It barely puts a dent in the electricity needs, but you have to start somewhere,” he said. “That’s why it’s philosophy-driven to start with.” Over the next two years, Murphy said IGD plans to improve the initiative and work with on-the-ground partners to install electricity in other locations. BOSCO Uganda, the 31 Lengths Campaign and the NGO Educate! program will assist IGD in Uganda. “We will install power systems, install Internet where it’s not already connected and some of our partners will provide training,” Murphy said. “We have to measure the impact of how many people we can train, how much power we can provide, but the intent is to start having businesses spin out.” If the program shows some success, Murphy said he hopes Accenture will agree to expand the number of sites and the impact of the initiative. Other Notre Dame faculty are involved in the effort as well. Michael Sweikar, associate director of IGD, said electrical engineering professor Michael Lemmon is working to design more efficient models for solar micro grids. Juan Carlos Guzman, director of research for the Institute for Latino Studies, will conduct the impact evaluation of the project, Sweikar said. “One of the real goals of IGD is to help link our resources on the ground with global development challenges,” Sweikar said. “That will lead to more opportunities for students to become engaged with faculty around doing real project and contributing to global development.” The project aims to prove a philanthropic-based program can eventually turn a profit while still having a positive impact on the world, Murphy said. “We’re not just providing electricity in today’s technology, but we’re looking into the technology, models, education and enterprises that can change the way business is done,” he said.last_img read more

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Vermont Information Technology Leaders forms alliance with Allscripts

first_imgVermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc, the non-profit organization facilitating the expanded use of health information technology in Vermont, and Allscripts (Nasdaq: MDRX), the leading US health information technology provider with a major facility located in South Burlington, Vermont, today announced their intention to enter into a strategic alliance.VITL is the state-funded provider of health information technology infrastructure for Vermont’s Blueprint for Health, a groundbreaking initiative of the Vermont Department of Health to build a statewide chronic care information system. Formed by a broad base of providers, payers, employers, patients, and state agencies, VITL is a multi-stakeholder nonprofit corporation largely supported by the state’s Health Information Technology Fund.The formal alliance between Allscripts and VITL was announced at the VITL Summit conference in Burlington, Vt. today following a speech by Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas. The alliance will allow the two organizations to leverage their combined expertise, capabilities, contacts, knowledge, and services to accelerate the adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems by Vermont-based physicians, with specific focus on small practices and rural physicians. It is envisioned that Allscripts products and services will be made available to Vermont health care providers at preferred pricing.The Blueprint for Health provides Vermonters the information, tools, and support they need to successfully manage their health. Its model of a patient centered medical home, supported by community health teams, seeks to shift the focus of healthcare from the largely reactive treatment of symptoms to a more proactive approach. VITL selected Allscripts as its partner in the statewide program after reviewing several Electronic Health Record system vendors.”Allscripts, with its strong presence in Vermont and its broad array of products, is the perfect partner for VITL,” said David Cochran, M.D., VITL’s President and CEO. “Allscripts offers physician practices a choice of three different electronic health records systems, all of which lead the market in terms of functionality. Allscripts also provides first-class locally-based technical support to its customers. We found that combination of product and support could not be beat.”Vern Davenport, Allscripts President, Government Sector, commented, “Vermont leads the nation in developing a sustainable blueprint for healthcare IT adoption and backing it up with strong leadership from Governor Douglas, state agencies, and VITL. We are proud to have been selected by VITL to help Vermont’s physicians take advantage of the phenomenal opportunity afforded by the new federal EHR incentives to enhance the quality and lower the cost of healthcare for everyone.”Beginning in 2011, Vermont physicians can qualify for between $44,000 and $64,000 in payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for adopting and demonstrating “meaningful use” of an EHR. Physicians who have not adopted certified EHR systems by 2014 will have their Medicare reimbursements reduced by up to 3 percent beginning in 2015.Studies demonstrate that effective use of EHR systems reduces medical errors, improves clinical quality and leads to better patient outcomes by enabling real-time access to patient records, medical information and best practices, and electronic connectivity to all healthcare stakeholders, including patients.The strategic partnership between VITL and Allscripts follows the announcement last week by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Gov. Douglas that Medicare will join Medicaid and private insurers in a new demonstration project to improve the way healthcare is delivered. The new partnership between the public and private payers will be based on the model of primary-care delivery that is currently being tested by Vermont’s Blueprint for Health.Under the Vermont model, private insurers work in cooperation with Medicaid to set uniform standards for advanced primary-care models, also known as medical homes. The goal is to provide physicians with incentives to spend more time with their patients and offer better-coordinated, higher-quality medical care.Allscripts will join VITL in facilitating the automation of the patient centered medical home (PCMH) and community health teams, local multidisciplinary teams created by the Blueprint initiative that provide care support across physician practices for prevention, health maintenance and chronic disease.About VITLVermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc., is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that operates as a public-private partnership. VITL’s mission is to collaborate with all stakeholders to expand the use of secure health information technology to improve the quality and efficiency of Vermont’s health care system.For more VITL news, follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/VITLVT(link is external)About AllscriptsAllscripts uses innovation technology to bring health to healthcare. More than 160,000 physicians, 800 hospitals and nearly 8,000 post-acute and homecare organizations utilize Allscripts to improve the health of their patients and their bottom line. The company’s award-winning solutions include electronic health records, electronic prescribing, revenue cycle management, practice management, document management, hospital care management, emergency department information systems and homecare automation. Allscripts is the brand name of Allscripts-Misys Healthcare Solutions, Inc. To learn more, visit www.allscripts.com(link is external).For more Allscripts news, follow us on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/AllscriptsMisys(link is external)This news release may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. Statements regarding future events, developments, the Company’s future performance, as well as management’s expectations, beliefs, intentions, plans, estimates or projections relating to the future are forward-looking statements within the meaning of these laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, some of which are outlined below. As a result, actual results may vary materially from those anticipated by the forward-looking statements. Among the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements are: the volume and timing of systems sales and installations; length of sales cycles and the installation process; the possibility that products will not achieve or sustain market acceptance; the timing, cost and success or failure of new product and service introductions, development and product upgrade releases; competitive pressures including product offerings, pricing and promotional activities; our ability to establish and maintain strategic relationships; undetected errors or similar problems in our software products; compliance with existing laws, regulations and industry initiatives and future changes in laws or regulations in the healthcare industry; possible regulation of the Company’s software by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; the possibility of product-related liabilities; our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel; our ability to identify and complete acquisitions, manage our growth and integrate acquisitions; the ability to recognize the benefits of the merger with Misys Healthcare Systems, LLC (“MHS”); the integration of MHS with the Company and the possible disruption of current plans and operations as a result thereof; maintaining our intellectual property rights and litigation involving intellectual property rights; risks related to third-party suppliers; our ability to obtain, use or successfully integrate third-party licensed technology; breach of our security by third parties; and the risk factors detailed from time to time in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our May 31, 2009 Annual Report on Form 10-K available through the Web site maintained by the Securities and Exchange Commission atwww.sec.gov(link is external). The Company undertakes no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.Source: Allscripts-Misys Healthcare Solutions, Inc. MONTPELIER, Vt. and CHICAGO, Sept. 24 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ —last_img read more

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Einstein Was Right: Black Holes, Gravitational Waves (& Interdimensional Time Travel) Exists

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York About 1.3 billion years ago, two black holes about 29 and 36 times the mass of the sun, respectively, collided at nearly half the speed of light, forming a new, massive, super-spinning black hole, which, within the final milliseconds of its birth, emitted an eruption of energy equivalent to about 50 times that of the entire universe.This nearly incomprehensible explosion of energy—a cosmic cataclysm creating literal ripples in the very fabric of spacetime, dubbed “Gravitational Waves”—was detected Sept. 14, 2015 by the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors in Livingston, Louisiana and Hanford, Washington.The existence of these mind-bending, realm-shattering waves was confirmed Thursday morning at the National Press Club in Washington, DC by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which funds the LIGOs. The announcement validates a major component of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity—E=mc2—and, in the words of the NSF, “opens an unprecedented new window to the cosmos.”The collision of two black holes had always been predicted, but never observed. LIGOs’ detections are being hailed as indisputable evidence.“This detection is the beginning of a new era: The field of gravitational wave astronomy is now a reality,” explains Gabriela González, spokesperson for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC)—a consortium of more than 1,000 scientists from around the globe—and professor of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University.Einstein predicted gravitational waves in 1916. His theory of general relativity is essentially the foundation for our understanding of gravitation, and was published the previous year. In a nutshell, it describes gravity as a property of space and time, aka spacetime. Spacetime, in its original, most stripped-down terms, regards the concept of “space” in this universe as comprising three dimensions, with “time” occupying an additional, singular dimension. Other theories predict many, many more dimensions than these four.To Einstein, gravity was a property of spacetime’s curvature. Mass dictates the degree of the latter. Boiled down, Einstein theorized that time and space could not exist as separate, disparate entities unto themselves. Instead, they are interwoven, mandating that events taking place at the same moment for one can also transpire at different moments for another.Sonic Boom, Earthquake, Government Cover-Up, Meteor, Or Something More Sinister?It is impossible to talk about Einstein’s general theory of relativity, however, without at the very minimum, mentioning the divine revelations proposed in his lesser-known, though arguably even more significant, special theory of relativity—a precursor to his most famous understandings, first proposed a full decade prior, in 1905. Published within his “Zur Elektrodynamik bewegter Körper,” translated, “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” paper, it resolves variances within the fundamental theories of electrodynamics, and, proposes new understandings of the mechanics pertaining to the speed of light.A technician works on one of LIGO’s optics. At each observatory, the 2 1/2-mile long L-shaped LIGO interferometer uses laser light split into two beams that travel back and forth down the arms. The beams are used to monitor the distance between mirrors precisely positioned at the ends of the arms. According to Einstein’s theory, the distance between the mirrors will change when a gravitational wave passed by the detector. (Photo Credit: LIGO Laboratory)In short, Einstein (with at least some credit to a handful of others, namely Hendrik Lorentz, Sir Isaac Newton, Heinrich Hertz, James Maxwell and Christian Doppler) proposed that essentially, the speed of light is absolute, thus, setting a benchmark, if you will, for the quantification of all energy, information, and matter—an existential parameter, of sorts! With this in mind, consequentially, our comprehension of “time” moves slower as our speed relative to other objects approaches the speed of light.Taken as a whole, these two theories of Einstein’s lay the groundwork for real, successful time travel, albeit only in one direction, forward, into the future. Theoretically speaking, approaching the speed of light on an excursion within a set period of reference would enable the time traveler to achieve that precise moment in much shorter “time” progression than those not accelerating at such speeds, and thus, biologically age slower. The progression of “time” would also appear to pass much slower for those within a gravitational field, Einstein’s theories predict. Basically, the faster an object travels, the more spacetime warps.Distortions in our experience of spacetime, perhaps best envisioned through the symbiotic relationship to our understanding—and now validation of—these gravitational waves, or “ripples,” may bring mankind as an entity-species yet one step closer to harnessing the reality of such a phenomenon, again, foretold more than a century ago.The PHENIX detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) records many different particles emerging from RHIC collisions, including photons, electrons, muons, and quark-containing particles called hadrons. The detector is shown here in a disassembled condition during maintenance. (Photo Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)We can discuss so-called “Dark Matter,” wormholes, and the potential for humans to open, and pass through, interdimensional spacetime gashes (think Walter Bishop’s destructive-yet-salvationary doorways in Fringe) in another post, as well as more about the subterranean electromagnetic corrider-colliding Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider currently conducting related experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which “relies very essentially on Einstein’s theory of relativity,” Berndt Mueller, BNL’s associate director for nuclear and particle physics, told the Press some “time” ago); the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva; and reverse-engineering of downed “extraterrestrial” spacecraft to enable our present-dimensional bodies to withstand such cosmic associations at another moment in “spacetime,” dear readers. Oh Einstein. Perhaps the next hundred “years” of research into your theories will yield even more validations of the unknown, enable us to also “travel” backwards (you know what I mean), and thank you in person ourselves for your divine, transcendental musings.Stay tuned.last_img read more

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