Podcast We Tell John Starks Why He Was The JR Smith Of

Below, Neil Paine’s notes for the discussion about Starks. Neil Paine’s quick and dirty analysis of John Starks. Welcome to this week’s episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. On this week’s show (Aug. 11, 2015), we revisit the career of an NBA cult favorite. As we were preparing topics for the show, Kate Fagan mentioned that it was John Starks’s 50th birthday this week. Starks, one of Kate’s favorites growing up, spent eight years as a member of the New York Knicks (1990-98), where he developed a reputation for fiery play, dunked over Michael Jordan and went 2-for-18 from the field (and 0-for-10 in the fourth quarter) in Game 7 of the 1994 NBA Finals. To celebrate, we look back at his career and how modern analytics would judge him. Oh, also, John Starks calls in, and we tell him how he should feel about himself.Also this week, a look at how the Blue Jays may have become the best team in baseball, and our Significant Digit of the week: Petr Cech had a rough first game for Arsenal in the Premier League, performing three standard deviations below the league average.Stream the episode by clicking the play button, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to above. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS One of the players most similar to Starks — both statistically and in Starks’s own mind — is former Knick (and current free agent) J.R. Smith. Starks passed more, and Smith is a more efficient shooter, but the two had similar rates of usage, steals and overall effectiveness. Hot Takedown And some things we learned researching his career through the lens of advanced stats:Starks was pretty good (nearly one standard deviation better than average) in four advanced statistical categories: usage rate, assist percentage, steal percentage and turnover percentage.Despite his self-professed defensive focus and participation in one of the most suffocating defenses ever, the metrics are inconclusive when it comes to Starks’s own defense. In Box Plus/Minus, he rates below average, while Jeremias Engelmann’s emulated plus/minus ratings from the ’90s consider him one of the decade’s better defensive guards. Starks was something of a trail-blazer for the 3-point shot, which has now taken over the game. When Starks was playing his best seasons, the average NBA player attempted a 3-pointer on roughly 11 percent of his shots, while Starks took a 3 on about 40 percent of his shots (a rate that ranked seventh among his contemporaries). Fast-forward to 2015, and 27 percent of all shots are 3-pointers. If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. Video: John Starks joins Hot Takedown read more

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Magic Johnsons Son on Being Gay I Can Only

Magic Johnson’s 20-year-old son is surprised by the public interest in his being gay, something that he revealed to his supportive family several years ago.Earvin Johnson III, known as E.J., says he feels as if he’s coming out of the closet a second time and that he’s “reveling” in the experience — even though news of his sexual orientation broke publicly sooner than he had planned.In an interview posted Tuesday on the YouTube.com talk show “Gwissues,” Johnson said that he didn’t feel violated after TMZ recently revealed that he’s gay.“I always wanted to come into the spotlight,” he said. “I always had dreams and plans of doing my own thing and creating my own image, so it came a little sooner than I thought it would, but this is still something I knew I would be going through and would have to experience.”The younger Johnson is a junior at New York University studying event management and design with an interest in fashion, journalism and media.He said the public reaction has ranged from support to criticism, including online postings involving “nasty things about me and what I’m doing.”“It’s almost like they’re attacking me for being me and so to that I can only say, ‘Well, I can only be myself, so I don’t know really what you want me to do,’” he told “Gwissues” host and interviewer Howard Bragman, a publicist who recently began representing Johnson.Johnson’s father, who co-owns the Los Angeles Dodgers, retired from the NBA in November 1991 after announcing he had HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. His wife, Cookie, was pregnant with E.J. at the time. The couple also has an adopted daughter, Elisa, and Magic has an older son, Andre, from a previous relationship.“I am very, very, very blessed to have the family that I do,” E.J. Johnson said. “My parents have always been super supportive. My sister and I have always been really close and she’s been really supportive as with my brother. When it was time to come out, I was, obviously, scared as most people are. After I got all the love and support from my family, then I knew I could go out and conquer the world, I guess.”Johnson said he first came out to his mother, who approached him when he was 13 or 14 years old.“I told her how I was feeling and she obviously told me that she had known and always would love me anyway. The same thing happened with my dad like a year or so later,” he said. “Everyone has to get used to it. No parent is prepared 100 percent and fully for something like that. We all had to work and move forward.”Read more: ESPN. read more

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The Amazing Longevity Of Jaromir Jagr

It’s not often that a player is still a desired commodity days after his 43rd birthday, but that’s precisely what Jaromir Jagr, who was traded from the New Jersey Devils to the Florida Panthers on Thursday, appears to be.Despite recent frustrations over his playing time with New Jersey, Jagr could prove to be a useful short-term rental for the Panthers. He retains the same soft hands and keen vision that made him a five-time scoring champion. And like so many of hockey’s greatest offensive talents before him, Jagr has a knack for skating where the action is headed before it arrives. His trademark strength seems scarcely to have waned with time; he still has moments when he’s nearly impossible to knock off the puck along the boards.Jagr is by no means the player he once was. But it’s improbable enough that he is still a player at all, still part of the league more than 24 years after his NHL debut. He had been 81 days older than the league’s second-oldest active player — St. Louis Blues goaltender Martin Brodeur — but then Brodeur up and retired last month. Now, no current player was born within 25 months of Jagr.Of course, more than perhaps any major sports league, the NHL has had a place for ancient players. Three and a half decades ago, Gordie Howe — then the NHL’s all-time scoring leader — famously skated through a full 80-game schedule that concluded a week after his 52nd birthday. More recently, Chris Chelios was still manning an NHL blueline at age 48. And just last season, Teemu Selanne played at an age seven months older than Jagr is now. So it’s not quite unprecedented for Jagr to still be around at age 43 — and counting.But Jagr’s past few years have surpassed what just about any other NHL player has ever done in his dotage. Despite posting the leanest traditional numbers of his long career this year (more on that later), Jagr is1As of late last week. in the midst of the seventh-best adjusted point shares above replacement (PSAR)2A modification of the Hockey-Reference.com metric that assigns goaltending worth according to Tom Tango’s wins above replacement and re-allocates the remaining value such that forwards receive 60 percent of league PSAR in a given season, defensemen get 30 percent and goaltenders receive 10 percent. season by any skater aged 43 or older3As of March 1 of the season in question. since the NHL’s Original Six era began in 1942-43. What’s more, he was better last year: No non-goalie aged 42 or older has ever had more PSAR in a season than Jagr’s 6.9 in 2013-14.Plus, there’s a strong case to be made that the conventional stats — and the next-level metrics based off of them, such as PSAR — have undersold Jagr’s contributions to the Devils, particularly this season.As marvelous as they are for a player his age, Jagr’s basic numbers this year haven’t been eye-popping by the standards of other forwards logging as much ice time. In 53 games, he’s notched a modest 11 goals and 18 assists to go with a -10 plus-minus rating. (As a point of comparison, if Jagr had played to his career per-game averages, he’d already have 25 goals and 37 assists by now!) According to PSAR, which synthesizes box-score stats into a single-number representation of value, it’s been his worst season ever — and by no small margin. The 18-year-old rookie version of Jagr had 3.1 PSAR in 1990-91, after which he wouldn’t put up fewer than 4.9 PSAR in a single season again — until this year.Hockey’s recent statistical revolution, however, has brought with it more sophisticated ways to gauge a player’s contribution to his team. Its biggest lesson? That although goals and assists are great, there’s also a big advantage in simply helping your team keep possession of the puck.And as it so happens, Jagr is still one of the best players in the league at that.Over the past two seasons, Jagr’s Devils haven’t been an especially strong hockey club. They rank 24th in both point percentage4In the wacky world of the NHL’s standings, some measure of sanity can still be salvaged by dividing a team’s standings points by the total number of points handed out in its games. So, for instance, the winner of a regulation game would earn 2 out of 2 total points; meanwhile, the winner of a shootout would get 2 out of the 3 total points awarded, since the loser would also get 1 point. Among other things, this has the advantage of preserving a .500 record as the mark of an average team. and goal differential during that span, and while the team has undeniably been plagued by poor shooting and save percentage luck, they’ve also posted relatively unimpressive possession rates — except when Jagr is on the ice. With Jagr, New Jersey plays like one of the premier possession teams in hockey5The Devils’ zone start-adjusted 5-on-5 Fenwick percentage with Jagr on the ice would rank third in the NHL over the past two seasons.; without him, they play like one of the worst.Studying Jagr’s game, it’s not hard to see why this is the case. Although his stride — never the fastest even in his prime — is noticeably sluggish these days, he makes up for it with sheer hockey sense, constantly scanning the ice for passing opportunities or chances to extend possession by corralling loose pucks. Perhaps more importantly, he remains the master of shielding the puck with his 6-foot-3-inch, 240-pound frame, creating scoring chances for himself and others by cycling possession deep within the offensive zone.“I know … my strength,” Jagr recently told NHL.com’s Dan Rosen. “I like to play [in the] offensive zone on the boards. I still feel like I’m strong enough to beat anybody, [or] at least hold that puck. … Maybe I’m not going to beat that guy one-on-one like I used to, but I can still make a play from that corner from the cycle. That’s my strength. And in the playoffs, that’s the way you play.”This is why, with the NHL’s trade deadline approaching, Jagr was mentioned as a legitimate option for contending teams looking to upgrade their offense — particularly with the man advantage — before the playoffs begin. Ironically, it seems that as the league increases its emphasis on possession, Jagr’s value has only been heightened even as his goals and assists have receded with age. And for Florida, barely clinging to the hope of a playoff berth but with clear upgrades to be had on the power play and in advanced metrics, Jagr might be a good fit.On the other hand, what does it say about the state of the NHL in 2015 that a plodding 43-year-old future Hall of Famer could change a team’s postseason chances?Like many things in hockey, it’s a question that leads back to Howe. In the foreword to Howe’s (excellent) new autobiography, the great defenseman Bobby Orr marveled at Howe’s longevity: “Today, if a player cracks the top five in scoring in the NHL, he’s considered a star. Do it a couple of years in a row and you’re a superstar. … Well, Gordie Howe did it twenty years in a row. That’s right — twenty. How do you begin to do justice to a legacy like that?”It was undoubtedly an impressive run for Howe, but — counterintuitively — the ability of a man in his 40s (and even 50s) to still dominate a professional sports league might speak as much about the quality of play around him as to his own athletic gifts.In 1968-69 — the final year of the streak to which Orr referred — a 40-year-old Howe was nearly the best player in hockey, finishing second only to 26-year-old Phil Esposito in PSAR. And in his final season more than a decade later, Howe was serviceable enough to be a regular contributor. But the NHL of that era also underwent an enormous amount of upheaval between expansion, the emergence of a rival league (the World Hockey Association), and the influx of new talent (and a fresh playing style) from Europe.In some ways, the chaos of the 1960s and ’70s provided the perfect cover for an aging megastar such as Howe to keep his career rolling. We can see this in the percentage of total NHL PSAR going to various cohorts of skaters, grouped by age, over time:The 1960s saw the NHL’s first expansion since the Great Depression — marking the end of the Original Six era — and they also coincided with a major uptick in the production of older players, one that would not fully abate until the early 1980s. In addition to Howe, players such as Alex Delvecchio, John Bucyk, Jean Beliveau, Frank Mahovlich and Jean Ratelle all produced great seasons in their late 30s (and beyond).The present day also appears to be a haven for the comparatively superannuated. Starting in the early to mid-1990s, the fraction of league value produced by the oldest batch of NHL players swelled to levels not seen since the 1970s. While that proportion has decreased a bit today relative to its peak in the immediate aftermath of the NHL’s lost 2004-05 season, it remains higher now than at any point between 1974 and 1996.So Jagr’s longevity, impressive as it is, might also be a symptom of ongoing weaknesses in the state of pro hockey itself. Is it mere coincidence that the uptick began right when the NHL’s aggressive expansion plans of the 1990s were fully realized? Or that it lasted through the so-called Dead Puck Era and well into the post-lockout “New NHL“? It’s not clear.But regardless of where Jagr sits in the intersection between the NHL’s health and the twilight of his once-immense (and still formidable) skills, he remains a player to which attention is owed. The Panthers are picking up more than a living legend playing out the final act of his career — they’re nabbing a player who still offers many of the little advantages that could make a difference along the journey to the Stanley Cup. read more

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Ohio State mens hockey swept by No 6 NebraskaOmaha drops to 39

Senior forward Anthony Greco during a game against Canisius on Nov. 13. OSU won 4-1. Credit: Courtesy of OSUWeek after week, Ohio State men’s hockey coach Steve Rohlik preaches how important the special teams game is in hockey and how it determines outcomes more often than not.This weekend in Omaha, Nebraska, his team lost that battle.Coming off of a bye week, OSU (3-9) entered back into the realm of facing opponents ranked in the top 20 after taking three of four games from Mercyhurst and Canisius. The three-game winning streak came to a close as the Scarlet and Gray were swept by No. 6 Nebraska-Omaha (11-2-1) by scores of 3-1 and 6-4 on Friday and Saturday, respectively.After a scoreless first period in Game 1, sophomores Luc Snuggerud and David Pope found the back of the net past OSU junior netminder Christian Frey, putting the Mavericks up 2-0 after 40 minutes of play.OSU senior captain Craig Dalrymple lit the lamp for the second time this season on the power play to put the Buckeyes within one with 7:07 left in the game. Fellow senior captain Anthony Greco and freshman Dakota Joshua assisted on the play.The OSU comeback effort fell short, however, as Nebraska-Omaha junior forward Austin Ortega scored his 10th goal of the campaign into an empty net with one minute and two seconds remaining.The Buckeye power play received seven attempts to make Nebraska-Omaha pay for its mistakes throughout the evening, but the Dalrymple tally was the only one registered on the scoreboard. The Mavericks were unable to convert on any of their three opportunities on the night.Frey made 30 saves on 33 Maverick shots while Nebraska-Omaha freshman netminder Evan Weninger stopped 34 of the 35 pucks sent his way.In Game 2, it was the Mavericks’ turn to enjoy some time with a man advantage, and they cashed in accordingly.Ortega scored his second of the weekend just 30 seconds into the game. But that was followed up by OSU freshman Mike Gillespie’s first collegiate goal four minutes and 22 seconds later.A Tommy Parran game misconduct penalty due to checking from behind combined with a Sasha Larocque boarding penalty put the Buckeyes on a five-on-three disadvantage that they were unable to overcome, as a goal from junior forward Jake Guentzel started a run of four straight goals from the Mavericks, three of which came on the power play.Instead of fading away faced with a 5-1 deficit with 4:23 left in the second period, the Scarlet and Gray battled to the final buzzer.Larocque continued the trend of Buckeyes scoring their first collegiate goals, as the freshman made it a 5-2 game at the 17:28 mark of the middle frame assisted by sophomore Christian Lampasso and Joshua.Then the captains took over in the third period, as Greco and Nick Schilkey made it a 5-4 game with 4:45 remaining in the game.OSU outshot the Mavericks 24-8 in the final 20 minutes.  Again, the rally would end in the form of an empty net goal, this time via Guentzel’s second of the night with 44 seconds left, ending the scoring for the game.Nebraska-Omaha went 3-of-6 on the power play, ending the Buckeyes’ stretch of 18 consecutive killed penalties in the process. OSU went 0-of-2.Junior Matt Tomkins, who started between the pipes for the Buckeyes, was removed after the fifth Maverick goal and replaced by Frey. Tomkins made 18 saves on 23 shots, while Frey stopped all 10 shots he faced. Weninger received the nod again to start for the home team, and he made 42 saves on 46 pucks sent in his direction.The Buckeyes will look to rebound in Minneapolis next weekend, as they are set to take on Minnesota in their Big Ten opener on Friday at 8 p.m., followed by a rematch on Saturday at the same time. read more

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Throwin heat The sorry states of Tiger Woods Charlie Weis and Ohio

Drive into the WoodsAfter blowing off authorities for two consecutive days, Tiger Woods again avoided speaking publicly on Sunday.But the world’s No. 1-ranked golfer did release a statement on his Web site, claiming blame for his “accident.”Woods allegedly backed his Cadillac SUV into a fire hydrant and then a tree. Then, his Swedish model wife supposedly bashed in the rear window with a golf club to rescue him. Sounds like an authentic fairy tale, right?Until the truth comes out, if it ever does (or if it differs from what little information has been leaked thus far), rumors will continue to swirl, dragging down Woods’ seemingly untarnishable reputation.Whether a cheating Woods was escaping the wrath of his wife or whether the worldly father was simply heading to Wal-Mart to pick up diapers at 2:30 a.m., damaging rumors will persist until Woods delivers an explanation.Once again, Tiger’s driving gets him into trouble. This time, however, his public image is at stake.A tale of two vastly different teams from OhioThe Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati Bengals both represent Ohio, but lately, they have been in two completely different states.The Bengals relied on newly inked running back Larry Johnson, who piled up 107 yards on the ground in Cincy’s 16-7 victory over the Browns Sunday.At 8-3, Cincinnati is inching its way toward an AFC North crown, while the 1-10 Browns sit mired in ineptitude at the bottom of the division.It’s quite a turnaround for the Bengals, who started the ’08 campaign with eight consecutive losses and just one win in their first 13 games. Still, Cincy closed out 2008 with three victories, relying on running back Cedric Benson, who averaged 118 rushing yards in the trio of wins.The Bengals carried that momentum into 2009. A defense that allowed just 19 points total in those final three ’08 victories now ranks fourth in the NFL in scoring defense. And before he went down with a hip injury, Benson was on pace for a 1,500-yard season.Clearly, the Bengals used the end of a lost season to build for the future.Cleveland now finds itself in that same, precarious position.The Browns own the league’s worst record, their lone victory a 6-3 joke against the Buffalo Bills amid swirling winds.Cleveland must determine if Brady Quinn can handle quarterback responsibilities and which playmakers, if any, should be brought back in 2010.The light at the end of 2009’s dark tunnel lies in the Browns’ late-season schedule. Cleveland closes out with games against lowly Kansas City and Oakland before hosting Jacksonville.For the Browns to replicate Cincinnati’s blueprint for a turnaround (and the prospects of this team turning things around that quickly are laughable), Eric Mangini’s squad must use those final contests to steer toward improvement in 2010.Enough with Charlie WeisWhen one thinks of Notre Dame football, what comes to mind?The years of proud tradition and the atmosphere of South Bend, or the incessant bantering about which soon-to-be-fired coach will get his pink slip next?The Fighting Irish lost to Stanford in a 45-38 shootout Saturday, as Notre Dame fell to an inexcusable 6-6. Charlie Weis’s five-year stay is inevitably over, whether the Irish ax him this week or wait until after Notre Dame’s bowl game to send him on his way.  Either way, the sooner Weis walks, the better. I think I speak for the 6 billion or so people who live outside of South Bend when I say that I’m sick of hearing about Weis’s potential canning.This will be the third-consecutive Notre Dame marriage to end with an ugly divorce, with Weis following in the footsteps of Bob Davie and Tyrone Willingham.If the Irish football program is so prestigious, then Notre Dame should annually land the top recruits. If it does that, then the coaching should be at least adequate enough to lead all the talent to a decent record.The constant stream of disappointment in the eras of Davie, Willingham and Weis leaves two possible explanations. Either Notre Dame isn’t landing enough top-tier talent through recruiting, or the Irish have foolishly swept through a trio of incapable coaches.The answer lies with one of the two solutions. Either recruit the talent that Irish Nation feels it can attract, or hire a high-caliber coach capable of extracting the most out of above-average talent. read more

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Emails reveal notsofine print

On Monday, Ohio State revealed more email correspondence between Jim Tressel and Columbus lawyer Christopher Cicero, the man who alerted the football coach of possible violations by players, which Tressel has since acknowledged he failed to disclose to OSU and NCAA officials. The previously undisclosed emails contain advice from Cicero to players involved with Eddie Rife, the owner of Fine Line Ink tattoo parlor. “My suggestion is to tell (names redacted) (and any other current player) who has had contact with him (Rife), that if they are approached in person, by phone, by “target” letter, by any person in law enforcement, tell them that BEFORE they talk to anybody, or respond to anybody that they MUST contact you first… especially if some stupid media would get ‘wind’ of this… ok. Chris,” Cicero said to Tressel in an email on April 16, 2010. Cicero also suggested that Tressel advise his players to speak to the coach if anyone questions them about the matter involving Rife, who was under a federal investigation for drug trafficking charges. Tressel responded to Cicero three days later, asking if he had any more information on names associated with the selling of the 2008 Big Ten Championship rings. Tressel also hinted that he had a “plan” regarding the 2009 Big Ten Championship rings that had yet to arrive. “Is there a way I could get all the ring names…I have a little plan once this year’s rings arrive….jt,” Tressel wrote. Cicero responded a day later. He said an agent of the district attorney involved with the Rife case had the rings sold to Rife. “Thanks!!” Tressel responded. More than a month had passed without another email from Cicero. On June 1, Tressel emailed Cicero asking if he had any more names from the rings that had been sold. Tressel told Cicero the 2009 Big Ten Championship rings were arriving that week. “Any names from our last discussion ?? I would like to hold some collateral if you know what I mean….. jt,” Tressel said in the email. Cicero responded later that day, indicating that the two names he provided before were “still good.” Cicero informed Tressel that communication between himself and the district attorney had ceased and that no more names had surfaced. OSU said the emails released Monday, which had been detailed in a Columbus Dispatch article, were “inadvertently omitted” from the initial email release on March 8. OSU also acknowledged receiving a formal list of allegations from the NCAA on Monday. The NCAA sent a letter addressed to President E. Gordon Gee explaining the current state of the investigation. OSU is expected to respond to the NCAA’s request by July 5 and a meeting is then set for Aug. 12. In an interview with ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” on March 13, Cicero confirmed he mentioned quarterback Terrelle Pryor and wide receiver DeVier Posey while informing Tressel of his players’ involvement with Rife. In an email to The Lantern, Cicero said: “I gave an ESPN interview in March 2011, with Chris Spielman where I gave a taped interview answering every question posed to me. It is the only interview I am giving on this matter.” Five Buckeyes, including Pryor, Posey, offensive lineman Mike Adams, running back Dan Herron and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas are suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits. Cicero played football at OSU under coach Earle Bruce, and graduated in the spring of 1984. He lettered his senior year. In an email Tressel sent to Ted Sarniak, a 67-year-old business man from Jeannette, Pa., who befriended Pryor many years ago, Tressel seemed to vouch for the Columbus lawyer. Sarniak accompanied Pryor on his recruiting trips to OSU and other universities as a mentor figure for the young athlete. Tressel explained to Sarniak the relationship between Cicero and the university. “This guy, Chris Cicero, is a criminal lawyer in town,” Tressel said in the email. “He played here when I was an assistant coach in the early 1980’s. He has always looked out for us.” read more

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Mens soccer plays to scoreless draw with Northwestern

Junior forward Kenny Cunningham (17) fires a shot in a game against Northwestern Oct. 20 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. The two teams tied, 0-0. Credit: Eric Seger / Sport editorThree of the last four matches for the Ohio State men’s soccer team (2-6-5, 0-2-2) have been against ranked opponents, and after a scoreless draw with the No. 16 Northwestern Wildcats, all three resulted in ties.OSU played to a 0-0 tie with then-No. 17 Louisville Oct. 2, and tied then-No. 18 Michigan State 1-1 Oct. 13.Buckeye redshirt-junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov recorded seven saves in Sunday’s match and earned his fifth shutout of the season. He is now tied with Penn State keeper Andrew Wolverton for third place in the Big Ten Conference for shutouts.Ivanov said the shutout was a good confidence booster moving into the last four games of the regular season.“Trying to keep the team in the game at all times is my job,” he said. “It’s good when we get a clean sheet for the defense, we’ll just have to keep moving forward and building on it.”Ivanov now has 80 saves in 12 games, keeping him in first place in the conference.Both teams were successful in creating scoring opportunities throughout the match, but neither was able to capitalize or find a way to get the ball in the net. The Wildcats outshot the Buckeyes by a total of 20-14 and led the OSU in corner kicks, 7-5.Despite the tie, Buckeye coach John Bluem said the team will walk away feeling like this game was a loss because it played well and had a lot of scoring opportunities throughout the game.“You just keep waiting for (a shot) to go in, somehow, for us and we felt like we deserved to win a game like this because we’ve been in so many of them, and it’s been kind of a rough stretch,” he said. “The guys’ attitudes are great and we are grinding away at it. If we can find a way to produce some goals we might make something happen this year.”Missed opportunities have been a continued trend this year for the Buckeyes. The trend continued on OSU’s second attempt of the second overtime when sophomore midfielder Zach Mason blasted a shot wide of the goal from outside the box with just more than five minutes left in play.Mason said after the game that despite the missed opportunities, the results of the last few games proves to the team that it can compete with anybody.“We’ve known (we can compete) all along, but these are results that are showing it on paper, so I think this is only going to boost our confidence and maybe get some wins in the next few games,” he said. “I think we will try and push each other in training and try and have some fun with it too. It can’t all be serious because it’s a game and we want to enjoy it. I think the last two games have shown that we’ve kept our spirits up and are still fighting to the end.”The Buckeyes have a break from in-conference action as they prepare to take on Oakland Wednesday and Cleveland State Sunday, before finishing off the season with games against Penn State and Wisconsin. read more

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Womens basketball Mitchells struggles lead to Buckeyes Big Ten tournament exit

Ohio State junior guard Kelsey Mitchell (3) facilitates the offense against Purdue during the Boilermakers’ 71-60 win against the Buckeyes at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis on March 4. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Sports DirectorINDIANAPOLIS — As Ohio State junior guard Kelsey Mitchell goes, so goes the Buckeyes’ women’s basketball team. And the only place Mitchell and her team are going after Saturday afternoon’s game is home.On Friday, against Northwestern in the Big Ten tournament quarterfinals, Mitchell led both teams with 27 points en route to a dominant 99-68 OSU victory. But in the following day’s game against Purdue, nothing went right for the Big Ten player of the year. Mitchell scored just nine points as she made 3 of 22 shots and just a single of her 12 3-point attempts, and OSU lost 71-60.“She didn’t have a good game,” said OSU coach Kevin McGuff. “She’s a spectacular player, one of the very best in college basketball, and tonight wasn’t her night.”The Buckeyes could not overcome their star’s struggles, as Purdue pulled off the 71-60 upset win, which knocked OSU out of the tournament and sent the Boilermakers to the final.The season low for the guard who averages 23.5 points per game picked up her second-lowest scoring total as a Buckeye, coming within a point of tying her career low of eight, set in 2015.The Boilermakers keyed in on the left-handed OSU guard’s proclivity to dribble to her dominant hand side.“We wanted to make her play on the right side of the floor,” said Purdue senior guard Ashley Morrissette. “They ran a couple plays where she got looks on the left side of the floor. But I thought, as a team, we did a great job of defending her.”This isn’t the first time the Boilermakers’ defense shut down Mitchell. In January, Purdue used a 1-2-2 zone defense to smother Mitchell, holding her to 14 points and making just 3-of-17 shots. But on Saturday, Purdue implemented a 2-3 zone defense. Purdue coach Sharon Versyp said the change was made due to OSU more frequently utilizing a two-guard lineup.“They executed and they trusted it and said, ‘Hey, let everybody else shoot the outside shot and just corrall her,” said Purdue coach Sharon Versyp.Versyp and Morrissette each noted the importance Purdue placed on surrounding Mitchell with two players at all times to keep her off balance.As a team, the Buckeyes shot just 34 percent from the field and made just 3 of 23 3-point attempts. OSU even struggled at the free throw line, with the Buckeyes making 7 of 15 from the charity stripe. “Once they got a lead, we seemed to get out of doing the things that we’ve done all year and (it) allowed us to be very efficient on offense,” McGuff said. “We were rushing shots and taking quick, contested shots instead of showing a little more patience and a little more trust in the execution.”In her six previous Big Ten tournament games, Mitchell averaged 29.8 points per game on 49 percent shooting.McGuff assuredly stated after Mitchell’s disappointing performance that no one is more likely to bounce back with authority than the OSU guard.“No one’s going to work harder, no one’s going to be in the gym more than she will,” McGuff said. “She’s going to make sure that her having an off night doesn’t happen again this year. I can assure you of that.” read more

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Mens gymnastics Ohio State places second at NCAA championships

Ohio State senior Andrew Rickly competes on the parallel bars against Michigan on Feb. 4 at St. John Arena. Credit: Walt Middleton, Courtesy of OSU AthleticsThe No. 3 Buckeyes finished the 2017 season with a second-place finish on Saturday at the NCAA championships with a readout of 423.700, the team’s highest score of the season. Oklahoma won its third consecutive national championship with a score of 431.950 followed by Illinois with 422.100. Stanford earned fourth place with 421.500 points and Minnesota and Nebraska finished in fifth and sixth place with scores of 414.200 and 412.900, respectively. During the qualifying round, the Buckeyes advanced to the team finals after receiving 414.650 points overall on Friday, the second-best score of the evening. Stanford was first with 420.450 points followed by Nebraska who scored 413.050.At the qualifying round, redshirt senior Jake Martin received a season-best score on vault with 14.350 points. His best performance out of six events was on the high bar where he scored a readout of 14.450 points, the second-best score of the event. Additionally, Brandon Bonanno scored a personal best on vault with a 14.350. Sean Melton scored 14.950 points on rings, the best score of the event. Redshirt junior Sean Melton, sophomore Alec Yoder, redshirt junior Jake Dastrup, sophomore David Szarvas and sophomore Joey Bonanno received All-America honors. Melton placed fourth in the all-around with a score of 86.400, Yoder placed sixth with 84.950, Dastrup placed seventh on the pommel horse with 14.550, Szarvas placed eighth on pommel with a career-best of 14.500. Lastly, Bonanno scored 14.400 points on floor, finishing sixth.OSU had its highest finish at the NCAA championships since 2005 when the Buckeyes also finished second. read more

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Football Ohio State molds offense to best suit Dwayne Haskins

Ohio State redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins (7) catches a snap in the second quarter of the game against Rutgers on Sept. 8. Ohio State won 52-3. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorWhen recruiting high school players to come to Ohio State, head coach Urban Meyer said he does not try and find players that fit the offense the team runs. For Meyer, it’s the opposite. It’s finding the best talent and molding the offense around particular players. With that, Meyer brought together a coaching staff with the goal of building an offense best suited to highlight the specific talents of the players they have. That idea continued with redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins. Haskins is taking over for J.T. Barrett, a former quarterback who specialized in the dual-threat option game, using his arm and his running ability intermittently to move the ball downfield, something the Buckeye offense built itself around. With Haskins, Ohio State had to mold a brand new offense, something Meyer has had to do before. “When we recruited Dwayne he had a very good skill set. So it’s our job as coaches to adapt,” Meyer said Monday. “So we’ve tried to have very good offensive coaches obviously, and they take what people can do and do what they do best.” That’s exactly what Ohio State has done. Instead of running an offense that leads the conference in rushing, something Barrett did in his final season with Ohio State, Meyer and his coaching staff have an offense that leads the Big Ten in passing, averaging 365.8 passing yards per game with quarterbacks completing 76.9 percent of passes for an average of 13.3 yards per completion. For Meyer, this is a product of what opposing defenses have given the Ohio State offense. He said opposing teams are still giving the wide receivers single coverage, and that Haskins takes advantage of the coverage with the timing the offensive line gives him inside the pocket. Leading quarterbacks like Alex Smith at Utah, Tim Tebow at Florida and Braxton Miller at Ohio State, Meyer said he rarely has a quarterback like Haskins, a pro-style, pass-first quarterback who has thrown 16-of-17 total passing touchdowns this season at the helm of his offense. “I don’t think we’ve ever had a team average over 300 yards passing in a game,” Meyer said. “It’s different. But the one thing that Ryan [Day] and Kevin [Wilson] have done is utilize the skill set we have of the offensive personnel.”With Ohio State averaging 54.5 points per game and leading the Big Ten with 599 yards of total offense per game, Meyer will take the yardage any way he can get it. “It’s all about equating numbers,” Meyer said. “You equate numbers a handful of different ways. And in the pro-style traditional guy like Dwayne, you equate it by throwing.” The change does not stop in the passing game. Without a quarterback who can run a run-pass option similar to Barrett or what Penn State redshirt senior quarterback Trace McSorley will run against the Ohio State defense on Saturday, Meyer cannot run the double option where the second option is the quarterback run. Meyer said the Ohio State offense still runs the double option, but in a different way than in past seasons. “The double options are, sometimes you’ll see it looks like a called pass, but that’s a run where we’re reading the second-level defenders,” Meyer said. With sophomore J.K. Dobbins and redshirt junior Mike Weber splitting series at running back, Ohio State has the No. 5 rush offense in the Big Ten, averaging 233.3 yards per game with backs averaging 5.4 yards per carry. Compared to the 17 touchdowns Ohio State has recorded in the passing game, six different backs have combined for 10 rushing touchdowns, with Weber and Dobbins combining for five scores. However, the true read-option offense is not exactly gone. In terms of personnel, Meyer said Ohio State still has the ability to run a similar kind of offense Barrett did in his collegiate career with redshirt freshman quarterback Tate Martell — who has averaged 6.7 yards per carry and scored two rushing touchdowns. As Meyer has said multiple times, Haskins is not Barrett. With that, Haskins will not run a dual-threat offense that serviced to Barrett’s strengths, just like Barrett would not have run a pro-style offense that would have complemented a quarterback like Cardale Jones. For Meyer, it’s about creating an offense that puts Haskins in the best situation to beat opposing defenses. “When you watch the film, it’s like I said, it’s not the same,” Meyer said. “It’s a very different offense right now. One was a run first, pass second. This is a do what they give you.” read more

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Early fall in EU student applications to UK universities

first_imgIn response to the uncertainty, ministers announced in October – just four days before the deadline – that students applying to start in 2017 would still be able to access funding for the duration of their degree, even if the UK leaves the EU during this timeHowever,  higher education professionals have urged the Government to consider extending the arrangement to apply to courses starting in 2018, to “avoid future uncertainty”.Professor Alan Smithers, director of the Centre for Education and Employment Research at the University of Buckingham, commented on the “striking” figures, saying he was “surprised” by the report.”It does look as though Brexit is having an effect,” he said.  “It could be that potential EU applicants are concerned that the student loans would no longer be available to them, or they are less sure (quite needlessly) of the reception they would get.”He continued: “In the short term, universities must point out these figures and persuade the Government to make it clear that the conditions of admissions are not going to change.” Demand from 18-year-olds in England and Wales also saw increases – by 8 per cent and 7 per cent respectively,  despite the young population falling by around 2 per cent this year.The figures raise concerns that the Brexit vote could take its toll on the number of EU students studying at UK higher education institutions. Following the referendum, uncertainty over funding for EU students  left prospective undergraduates questioning their eligiblity for loans and grants.Under the current system, EU students are eligible to receive undergraduate tuition fee loans if they have lived in the European Economic Area for at least three years prior to starting university.  Tuition fees for EU undergraduates are currently set at the same rate as home-students. Nicola Dandridge, chief executive of Universities UK, the vice chancellors’ group, said the fall “highlights the importance of ensuring that prospective European applicants are made fully aware of the fees and financial support arrangements well in advance of the applications window.” She added: “To avoid future uncertainty, we need the Government to extend these transitional arrangement now for EU students considering applying for courses starting in 2018.”However, Ms Dandridge also urged caution, stating that “only a small percentage of applicants apply by this date and we must wait until the main January deadline before we see the full picture for this application cycle.”A Government spokesperson said: “International students make an important contribution to the UK’s world-class universities.“It is too early in the application cycle to predict reliable trends, but the overall increase in applicant numbers is positive – and suggests even more students will be able to benefit from higher education next year.” Ucas The number of EU students applying to study at universities in the UK has seen an early decline, figures have revealed.According to the data, there has been a 9 per cent fall in EU applications to the early October deadline, reversing the four year trend in annual increases.The numbers, released by Ucas (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service), detail applicant numbers for higher education courses with the early October deadline, including  medicine and dentistry, and applications for the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford.Some 6,240 EU students applied to the early deadline this year, a 9 per cent decrease on the 6,860 who applied last year. This is despite a 3 per cent rise in the number of UK applicants and a 1 per cent rise in overseas students to the same deadline. To avoid future uncertainty, we need the government to extend these transitional arrangement now for EU students considering applying for courses starting in 2018Nicola Dandridge There has been a 3 per cent rise in the number of UK applicants through Ucas It could be that potential EU applicants are concerned that the student loans would no longer be available to them, or they are less sure (quite needlessly) of the reception they would getAlan Smithers Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Ian Brady Myra Hindley was as ruthless as I was and it

first_imgMyra Hindley was just as “ruthless as I was”, Ian Brady claimed, as he revealed that it was his lover who began the knife attack on their first victim.In a series of previously-unpublished confessions made while he was in custody, Brady said that his Moors Murders accomplice was “surprisingly in tune with me”.Hindley, who died in prison in 2002, had always maintained that Brady – who died in a mental health hospital on Monday – manipulated her to murder their five child victims.However, after Brady’s death at 79, it has emerged that he sought to dismiss that claim, which is said to have “infuriated” him.His descriptions of Hindley’s lust for blood are contained in a series of taped conversations with Dr Alan Keightley, an academic who visited Brady in prison every month for years. Opening the inquest, he said Brady’s body will not yet be released. Mr Sumner said he wanted assurances that Brady’s ashes will not be scattered on the same moorland where he and Hindley’s five child victims were buried – a request Brady is believed to have made in his will.”I have no legal means of making that an order, but I think it’s a right and proper moral judgement to make, ” he said. “I think it would be offensive.”Mr Sumner also said he wanted confirmation that a funeral director and crematorium willing to take Brady’s body have been found. In the first account by Brady of the 1960s killings that shocked Britain, the book – which is being serialised in the Daily Mail – tells how he described their meticulous planning of the killings. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. But his lawyer Robin Makin, who visited the killer in the hours before his death to discuss his legal wishes and funeral arrangements, told the Daily Mail: “It’s none of the coroner’s business.” Searchers digging on Saddleworth Moor in the search for victimsCredit: Paul Popper/Popperfoto Court sketch of Ian Brady appearing during a tribunal in Manchester in June 2013 Credit:Elizabeth Cook/PA He said that Hindley had lured Pauline into a van that the couple used to take her to Saddleworth Moor.Brady claimed that Hindley’s “expression was taunting and pitiless” as they abused the girl and said that before he could fetch his knife from the van, his lover was already stabbing Pauline. Ian Brady and Myra Hindley in the back of a police van in May 1966 Credit:Bentley Archive/Popperfoto Brady told Dr Keightley that it was in fact Hindley who attempted to kill their first victim, 16-year-old Pauline Reade, before he did.   Ian Brady appearing  When Hindley died in 2002, no local funeral directors would take her body and the Prison Service later found a firm 200 miles away that was willing to arrange for her cremation. Ian Brady and Myra Hindley in the back of a police van in May 1966 Searchers digging in peat on Saddleworth Moor, near Greenfield, Yorkshire, in the search for victims of the Moors murderers, Brady died at Ashworth High Secure Hospital in Maghull, Merseyside, just after 6pm on Monday.An inquest on Tuesday heard his cause of death was cor pulmonale, a type of heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or lung disease.Senior coroner for Sefton, Christopher Sumner, sought to block the killer’s ashes from being scattered on Saddleworth Moor. In 1966, Brady and Hindley were jailed for life for the killings of John Kilbride, 12, 10-year-old Lesley Ann Downey and Edward Evans, 17. They went on to admit the murders of Pauline Reade, 16, and Keith Bennett.Glasgow-born Brady had been held at Ashworth since 1985. Hindley died in jail aged 60 in November 2002. Dr Keightley began writing to Brady in 1992 at the suggestions of Moors Murders victim Lesley Ann Downey’s family while he was head of religious studies at a sixth form college in the West Midlands.He turned his archive of their conversations – in person, on the phone and by letter – into a book that he agreed would not be published until the killer’s death.Addressing claims that he had “brainwashed” Hindley to commit the crimes with him, Brady told Dr Keightley: “Our relationship wasn’t master and slave. It was more like teacher and student.”Brady told how Hindley was “surprisingly in tune with me from the very beginning”. He added: “I was never conscious of having to exert myself to coerce her into accepting my belief in relativist morality. Bit by bit we were moving towards an almost telepathic relationship. She was as ruthless as I was.”last_img read more

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Opera singer praised by audience despite having only three hours to rehearse

first_imgMs Puertolas landed the role less than 24 hours before the performance Mr Fernandez added: “This is one of the biggest roles she has had and to get an applause and ovation was incredible. She loves Covent Garden and everyone who worked on the production so it was a very happy outcome for her.” Oliver Mears, director of opera at The Royal Opera, said: “Sabina has performed at Covent Garden twice before, on both occasions exceptionally. This was therefore a great opportunity to acknowledge those performances by bringing her back, so we’re thrilled, but not surprised, at how well her jump in worked out for both her and for us.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Her manager, Alex Fernandez, admits that she was a little nervous having had so little time to rehearse or become accustomed with the other opera singers. An opera singer who had just three hours to rehearse before performing to thousands of people at the Royal Opera House has revealed how she was petrified about singing to British music lovers.Sabina Puertolas, a Spanish soprano, was flown into Britain on the very day she was to step in to perform in Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto after the well known English soprano Lucy Crowe fell ill with a throat infection. Ms Puertolas only learned of her role as a last minute replacement the day before the curtain was due to go up and so she was petrified that she would not impress London’s opera loving crowds.She told The Sunday Telegraph: “I got the call from my manager in the afternoon asking me how I was feeling – if I had a cold or the flu? Then, I got a second call to say that I had to be on a flight the next day to London. I knew I had to help the Royal Opera House. I had to remember to pack the score. What happened the next day will remain in my heart as the most emotional moment in my career.”It has now emerged that Royal Opera House bosses had to make more than a dozen calls before finding an accomplished enough singer suitable to perform as Gilda, Rigoletto’s daughter. Some sopranos were found to be already booked while others lacked a visa to work in the UK. Ms Puertolas received a “thunderous” applause for her performanceCredit:Jam Media Ms Puertolas landed the role less than 24 hours before the performance “She was so scared that the audience wouldn’t like her, people come to see a certain soprano so it was a lot of pressure,” he said.However, she proved to be a tremendous hit and received “thunderous” applause, perhaps in part because the audience knew she was a last minute booking.“It was absolutely fantastic,” Ms Puertolas said. “I had three magical and unforgettable hours.”She said she resisted the temptation to dwell on her inevitable fears having had so little rehearsal because she wanted to enjoy singing on one of the world’s most “historic stages”.  Lucy Crowe fell ill and was unable to perform “The applause was the moment when I realised where I was and what I had done. It was such an ovation from the audience I was not expecting it, so I felt overwhelmed and started crying.”John Darlington, an opera lover at the performance, told the Wall Street Journal: “When we heard that the lead soprano wasn’t going to be performing the immediate reaction was your heart drops. You think ‘I came here to hear her [Lucy Crowe]’.“The final curtain call was, for me, the most memorable bit of the whole night actually because she came on stage, she got an absolute thunderous applause, and the whole of the audience was absolutely behind her.” Lucy Crowe fell ill and was unable to performCredit:Rii Schroer Ms Puertolas received a "thunderous" applause for her performancelast_img read more

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Revealed Churchills secret affair and the painting that could have damaged his

first_imgThe year is 1942 and Britain’s wartime Prime Minister is at the White House for a summit with the President of the United States to discuss the progress of the war against Nazi Germany.Tobruk has just fallen to Germans and Italian troops and Winston Churchill is desperate to retain the support of the American public, many of who are suspicious of their country’s recent intervention in the old world’s quarrels.But he also has a pressing personal matter on his mind.At the same time as leading Britain in the war in Africa and Europe, and trying to emphasise the need for the US to stand shoulder to shoulder with this country in the face of totalitarian dictatorship, Churchill is trying to arrange for the return to the UK of an old acquaintance, the beautiful and glamorous London socialite Doris Castlerosse. Churchill and Lady Castlerosse never have the chance to meet again. On December 9, 1942, she died of an overdose of sleeping pills at the Dorchester Hotel, in London’s Park Lane.There is no record of Churchill’s reaction, but shortly after Churchill’s friend and ally, the newspaper magnate Lord Beaverbrook, met Lady Castlerosse’s brother and took possession of the painting, only returning it to the family at the end of the war.Dr Dockter says the revelations about Churchill’s affair with Lady Castlerosse and his portrait of her she new light on the wartime leader.“When he’s leading his country in a global war and under enormous pressure, he comes to fear that people might get wind of the affair he’d had with Lady Castlerosse.“It underscores his greatness that in the midst of all that pressure he can break off to deal with that potential problem,” Dr Dockter told The Telegraph.“Churchill has been deified, but this story allows us to view him as a far more complex character. He’s still a national hero, but he’s also a guy who has an affair.”Churchill’s Secret Affair is on Channel 4 on March 4 at 8pm Churchill and President Franklin D. Roosevelt pictured during the meeting of the Pacific War Council at the White House in June 1942Credit:Corbis The fling between Churchill and Lady Castlerosse – who happens to be the great aunt of Cara Delevingne, the model and actress – took place when they holidayed together on four occasions between 1934 and 1936 at a chateau owned by an American actress in the south of France.It was here that Churchill, a keen amateur artist, painted Lady Castlerosse’s portrait. One canvas shows her reclining languidly on a couch.Churchill’s marriage to his wife Clementine was going through a rocky patch and his political career was in the doldrums and friends say he sought refuge, albeit briefly, in her arms.Lady Castlerosse’s niece Caroline Delevingne, Cara’s aunt, says: “They had an affair. Both my parents talked about it and knew about it.”A never before seen letter, discovered by Professor Richard Toye, of Exeter University, lays bare how close the pair were. One of the portraits painted by Churchill of Lady Castlerosse Their paths crossed again in the June of 1942, by which point Lady Castlerosse was living in New York but, with no means of supporting herself, was desperate to return to Britain.With all available ships used to ferry troops and supplies to Britain passage home was hard to find.During his visit to Washington Churchill sneaks away for a private dinner with his former lover.Here according to Lady Castlerosse’s husband Valentine, Churchill expresses his concern that the sultry portrait he painted of her might fall into the hands of US gossip magazines and undermine his reputation – at a time when the Anglo-American alliance needs to remain steadfast.Dr Dockter tells a forthcoming Channel 4 documentary: “He was vulnerable to being blackmailed and must have thought ‘I just have to deal with this and get her back to Britain as soon as possible’.” In fact Lady Castlerosse was an old flame of Churchill’s and the full details of the brief, but passionate affair they enjoyed nearly eight year earlier can now be revealed for the first time.It has now emerged that arranging for his former lover’s safe passage was not just a matter of sentiment for the Prime Minister.Historians have discovered that Churchill was particularly keen for her to return to London before the American public got wind of their previous relationship. Cara Delevingne, the great niece of Churchill’s lover, Lady CastlerosseCredit:Kirstin Sinclair/Getty Images One of the portraits painted by Churchill of Lady Castlerosse Lady Castlerosse in the south of France, at the time of her affair with Churchill Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Cara Delevingne, the great niece of Churchill's lover, Lady Castlerosse In 1934 Churchill wrote to Doris: “What fun we had at Maxine’s. It was beautiful having you there. You were once again a manifest blessing and a ray of sunshine around the pool. I wonder whether we shall meet again next summer.”They did, but by 1937 the affair had run its course. Churchill threw himself back into front line politics and devoted himself to driving home his warnings about the danger posed by Hitler. Indeed, the last thing he wanted was Lady Castlerosse revealing details of their affair to the newspapers, including the fact that during their relationship he had painted sensuous portraits of her, one of which she had kept in her possession..The discovery in the Churchill Archives by Dr Warren Dockter, lecturer in international politics at Aberystwyth University, of a taped interview with the Prime Minister’s private secretary, Jock Colville, confirmed the long rumoured affair. Lady Castlerosse in the south of France, at the time of her affair with Churchill In the summer of 1942 Lady Castlerosse writes to President Roosevelt thanking him for his efforts on Churchill’s behalf to get her safe passage home and shortly after she is found a space on a seaplane for the return flight back to Blighty – taking the portrait home with her. Churchill and President Franklin D. Roosevelt pictured during the meeting of the Pacific War Council at the White House in June 1942last_img read more

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Rise of women backing out of divorces as court settlements shrink

Fewer wives are being awarded income for life and they are increasingly having their divorce settlement limited to a few years.  Women are backing out of divorce cases because settlements are becoming less generous, experts have said.  This is making some of them back off from going through with a split, law firms say.  In a landmark case in 2014, the High Court ruled that judges should prioritise a “transition to independence”, even if this involved “a degree of (not undue) hardship”.  Figures from the Ministry of Justice published last year show that orders for ongoing payments had fallen by five per cent since 2011, while lump sum orders, which allow for a clean break, had risen by 10 per… read more

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Trump Baby blimp flies outside Parliament as thousands of protesters march through

A Greenpeace protester flying a microlight passes over Donald Trump's resort in Turnberry, South Ayrshire Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of central London against President Donald Trump’s four-day visit to the UK, pouring into Trafalgar Square for a mass rally attended by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. “Say it loud, say it clear, Donald Trump’s not welcome here,” chanted the vast crowd over and over as they marched through the capital, snaking through Regent Street.Organisers of the Together Against Trump mass demonstration claimed they had been told by police that more than 100,000 protesters had joined the march by mid-afternoon.“Dump Trump”, “atrocious POTUS” and “not on our soil” were among the anti-Trump messages visible in a sea of protesters holding placards as they marched to attend a larger rally in Trafalgar Square.“Trump wears poorly tailored suits,”  proclaimed one sign. Another stated: “Overcomb Brexit.” ‘Stop Trump’ demonstrators march through Regent Street in LondonCredit:PA Addressing protesters at the Trafalgar Square rally, journalist and campaigner Owen Jones said: “Donald Trump. You came, you saw, and we told you where to go.”To cheers from the crowd, he added: “This is a historic protest and, I have to say, I will die laughing knowing we managed to organise a protest bigger than the inauguration.”Thousands of demonstrators also gathered in Glasgow’s George Square to protest against Trump’s visit as he prepares to fly to Scotland. Mark Levin,67, visiting from Florida said: “I never thought I would see something like this.” trump protests Protesters gather in Trafalgar Square  Protesters gather in Trafalgar Square Credit:AFP Bloody hell this is Regent Street in London right now pic via @jamcreencia #TrumpVisit pic.twitter.com/1QYcow73Qy— Elliot Wagland (@elliotwagland) July 13, 2018 Filled with five tanks of helium, it gradually ascended to its maximum height of 30 metres over the Houses of Parliament.The baby, which cost £5,000 to make, was created by 36-year-old Matt Bonner, a London graphic designer. Donald Trump “Trump is just so full of hatred'” she said. “His views are just ancient and against everything I stand for.”Ahead of Mr Trump’s visit, a ‘ring of steel’ was erected outside Winfield House, the US ambassador’s official residence in Regent’s Park, where the president and and his wife Melania stayed overnight.Protesters staged a noisy gathering outside the property as he arrived in a helicopter, from Stansted airport, holding up placards which included “Dump Trump” and “Trump not welcome” last night.Thousands gather for anti-Trump marchThousands of anti-Trump protestors gathered outside the BBC in central London before marching down to the main rally in Trafalgar Square.Many say they took a day off work to attend the protest.Sarah Shirley, 49, who travelled down from Exeter with her 12-year-old daughter Rosa, said it was the first march she had attended since the Poll Tax. Demonstrators march along Regent Street in central London Credit:Bloomberg  A few Trump supporters were also interspersed among the crowd of several hundred surrounding the baby balloon in Parliament Square.Chris Hill, a company executive from Boston, said he had voted for Trump in the last election and will vote for him again. Protests continue in ScotlandLater on Friday Trump flew to Scotland where he is staying at his Trump Turnberry golf course.Protest are expected to continue into the weekend in Scotland, with one staged by Greenpeace almost as soon as he arrived in the country. Swooping within some few hundred yards of the president as he stood outside the golf course’s hotel, a paraglider with a banner message saying “Trump Well Below Par” flew above the resort on Friday evening. The Trump Baby blimp hovers next to the statue of former British Prime Minister Winston ChurchillCredit:AP A Greenpeace protester flying a microlight passes over Donald Trump’s resort in Turnberry, South AyrshireCredit: John Linton/PA At 9.30am this morning the ‘Trump Baby’ blimp was released next to the bronze statues of Winston Churchill, Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela for its agreed two-hour flight.The blimp, depicting Mr Trump as a whingeing nappy-clad baby clutching a mobile phone, was released ahead of planned rallies across the capital.  'Baby Trump'  Earlier, Mr Trump briefly joined the pantheon of greats to be immortalised in Parliament Square amid the whirlwind of protests, however the depiction of the president was less than flattering. Sarah Hejazifar, 34, a US citizen who lives in Colchester, came holding a placard and with her infant daughter Sophie strapped to her chest. “At what point did we say politicians have to be moral people?” he asked. “What he has done makes perfect sense.”Augustine Obodo, from Sidcup, attended in a Make America Great again cap and says he is the founder of an organisation called “Friends of Trump UK”.”This is a national disaster,” he said, pointing at the blimp. “This is not Trump, this is a mockery.”Trump Baby set to go on tourAt 11.30am – as agreed with the Mayor of London – protesters hauled back the orange blimp to Parliament Square prompting cheers and whoops from the crowd.The activists who organised the protest say they have already received requests from as far away as Australia to fly the baby again at forthcoming Presidential visits.The crowd of around 1,000 were good natured, with many attending their first ever protest, bringing their children in tow. “Our motivation is quite clearly mockery,” he said.”It is the only language Donald Trump understands.”Margaret Callanan, who works in public relations and lives in London had come to watch the baby with her children James, 4, and Sophie, 1.”It is horrendous,” she said of the president’s inflatable visage. “But wonderful to see it flying up over Parliament Square.”Americans ignore US embassy adviceDespite a warning issued by the US embassy for Americans to keep a low profile during the president’s visit, several were in the crowd. trump protest  The ‘Baby Trump’ balloon rises in Parliament SquareCredit:PA trump baby  Watch as @realDonaldTrump tries to hide from our message flying right over his head #resist #stoptrump pic.twitter.com/hINfBLpFoZ— Greenpeace UK (@GreenpeaceUK) July 13, 2018 “It is the most frightened I have been about politics in my entire life,” she said.Robert Gallagher, 64, of Palmers Green, attended with his 30-year-old daughter Sophie and held a placard reading: ‘London 1. Trump nil’.”Looking at all these people makes me proud of my city,” he said.Student Lucy Blackburn, 18, travelled down from Sheffield to attend the protest. She carried a placard reading: ‘This is the only instance I will say ‘go back to your country’. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Thousands more people are expected in Edinburgh for a Carnival of Resistance in the Meadows area of the capital.Campaigners will also gather outside the Trump International Golf Links in Balmedie, Aberdeenshire, on Saturday, and it is predicted there could be further demonstrations at Turnberry.Despite saying a blimp depicting Mr Trump as a whingeing nappy-clad baby had made him feel unwelcome in London he is expected to be playing golf while Saturday’s protests take place. Ben Stewart, from the campaign group, said: “Theresa May should not have dignified Trump with a visit to the UK. The vast majority of British people are appalled by his words and deeds. He is, simply, the worst president ever. That’s why we flew over him with a message branding him well below par.” A giant balloon inflated by activists depicting US President Donald Trump as an orange baby in Parliament Square Credit:AFP read more

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Labour to back Englandled bid for 2030 World Cup

Labour would back an England-led bid to host the World Cup in 2030, the party’s deputy leader has said.Tom Watson said Labour supported putting a bid together for 2030 to celebrate the centenary of the World Cup football tournament.Speaking on Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday, Mr Watson said: “I’ve been driving my kids crazy because I am old enough to remember Italia 90 when we got through to the semi-finals and the country was alive.”After a very difficult year, seeing the country united these last few weeks has been fantastic – and it seems to me you look at Premier League football, which is the best in the world, you look at our lower league football – which is really well run, the Football Foundation has made investments in grassroots football. England fans celebrate as England score the second of their two goals against Sweden England fans celebrate as England score the second of their two goals against SwedenCredit:Matt Cardy/Getty Images Europe “It’s the national game, it can bring the country together, it can give us hope.”We were disappointed in 2018 when we did the World Cup bid, it seems to me that we should be bidding for the World Cup 2030.”That’s a few years off and we don’t know who’s going to be in government in a few years’ time. If we’re in government, I hope it’s one of the first things a Labour government does, which is work with our FA to try and put a World Cup bid together.”If the Conservatives are still in government, then we’d like to work with them to make sure that a bid is successful.”Mr Watson said that he “just wanted England to win”, adding: “I’m not that bothered about the final to be honest with you.”He later tweeted: “I have today announced Labour’s support for an England-led bid for the 2030 World Cup. Where better to celebrate the centenary of the World Cup than in the nation where football was born.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Mumpreneur and lipstick entrepreneur put young women off starting businesses MPs warn

Childcare laws should also be changed to allow nursery and pre-school teachers to look after more children, as the UK’s ratios are currently “among the most stringent in the OECD”, the report added. Other hurdles include “networking opportunities that favour men” and difficulty accessing funding. The Telegraph’s Women Mean Business Campaign was launched earlier this year to encourage the Government to close the funding gap faced by female entrepreneurs. Annabel Denham, the co-ordinator of the APPG and author of the report, said: “Frustratingly, women are subject to unconscious biases around funding, lack the confidence and role models to pursue careers in STEM, and are erroneously perceived as having inadequate business experience and skills, and a reluctance to take risks.”Seema Malhotra MP, an officer of the APPG, said: “There is no single solution to this issue, but there is a need for an integrated strategy, incorporating tweaks to maternity pay and childcare.”Chris Hulatt, co-founder of Octopus Group, which sponsored the report, said: “Too few female-founded companies are securing the funding they need to scale.”If Global Britain is to be a success, it is critical that women have the same opportunities to realise their ambitions and create the high growth businesses of tomorrow. ” Terms like “mumpreneur” and “lipstick entrepreneur” are stopping young women from starting businesses, MPs say.In a report the All Party Parliamentary Group for Entrepreneurship said that girls were being put off launching careers as science and tech entrepreneurs because of a perception that women’s businesses belonged in the lifestyle sector. “The media often portrays women as running ‘lifestyle’ businesses, which have little opportunity for growth. Terms like ‘mumpreneur’ or ‘lipstick entrepreneur’ do little to tackle the stereotype,” its report warns. “The media should move away from gender altogether when profiling Britain’s most successful entrepreneurs.”Stereotyping means that women are more likely to launch businesses in sectors where it is difficult to scale up quickly, such as retail, health and the arts.Women interviewed by the APPG said it was difficult to build profitable businesses in more scalable sectors such as tech, construction and manufacturing.The report found that 31 per cent of women saw their gender as a drawback when trying to expand their business, compared to less than one per cent of men. MPs also recommended that benefits for self-employed men should be changed to bring them into line with statutory paternity pay. Currently women who work for themselves receive government-funded Maternity Allowance, but there is no equivalent for men. Introducing a paternity allowance would mean “British society re-examines the expectations placed on women to carry out certain roles”, the report argues. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Proposal to research trans regret rejected by university for fear of backlash

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A general view of the Royal Courts of Justice  The case was heard at the Royal Courts of JusticeCredit:Jack Taylor/Getty Images Mr Caspian had applied to study an MA at Bath Spa universityCredit:Jay Williams The City of Bath A psychotherapist who wanted to research reverse gender reassignment claimed that he had his academic proposal rejected because his university was scared of backlash from trans community, the High Court heard.James Caspian, 59, planned to study the experiences of people who have detransitioned as part of an MA at Bath Spa University, but his idea was rejected because it was “too ethically complex for a piece of research at master’s level”.When Mr Caspian proposed the project, the university’s ethics subcommittee said: “attacks on social media may not be confined to the researcher but may involve the university.” On Tuesday, Mr Diamond told the court: “That is not academic judgment, that is terror on the streets of our universities.”Mr Caspian’s barrister, Paul Diamond, argued that the Bath Spa had rejected the proposal on the grounds that “engaging in a potentially politically incorrect piece of research carries a risk to the university” and was seeking a judicial review of the process. However, the judge, Michael Kent QC, quashed their case, saying: “I entirely accept that there are important issues of freedom of expression. I just do not accept that, on the facts of this particular case, there is an arguable case made out.He added that the application was brought too late after the university’s decision, and said: “I accept that it could be said that this is pedantic and it is far removed from the underlying decision, but I can’t see any way round that.”Speaking afterwards, Mr Caspian told The Telegraph: “I think this sets a dangerous precedent in that research into sensitive areas will not be carried out because universities don’t want to take ownership.”Mr Caspian was described by his barrister as “a psychotherapist with an esteemed reputation in the field of gender transition and gender dysphoria”, and as a “highly qualified and experienced professional” who is “clearly objectively qualified to do research on this subject matter”.“He’s not a spotty-nosed adolescent student. He’s the real McCoy,” said Mr Diamond.He argued that “research in this complex field is needed as there are pressing social pressures on wider society to commence the procedure of gender realignment”, but added: “There is an atmosphere of fear in the academic community on researching this phenomenon.” The psychotherapist had worked with transgender patients for eight years when he enrolled for the MA at Bath Spa University, and was a trustee of the transgender charity the Beaumont Trust.He previously told BBC’s Radio 4 that he was “astonished” at the university’s decision to stop him studying people who regret changing their gender.”I think that a university exists to encourage discussion, research – dissent even, challenging perhaps ideas that are out of date or not particularly useful,” he said.Since 2017, when his case first gained public attention, more than 50 people have approached Mr Caspian after deciding to reverse their gender reassignment surgery.Now, having failed in his bid for a judicial review, he says: “I will be discussing with our lawyers the next steps which may include going to the court of appeal.” read more

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